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In a dwelling unit, can 15A receptacles go on a 20A circuit & breaker?

And could 20A receptacles go on a 30A circuit & breaker?

Seems obvious that they can, but are there rules prohibiting this?
According to rule #26-700(2),the answer would be NO,except as provided for by other rules of the code. what these other rules of the code are,i have no idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Damn. I don't like that rule.

So A 15A receptacle must be on a 15A circuit, the only way around it is it to supply the circuit with a 20A breaker, min#12cu and a 5-20R receptacle?

I just don't get what the difference is with a 5-20R on that circuit versus a 5-15R.
 

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According to rule #26-700(2),the answer would be NO,except as provided for by other rules of the code. what these other rules of the code are,i have no idea.
From p. 454, Appendix B:

Rule 26-700, Diagrams 1 and 2
"Receptacles of the CSA 5-20R and 6-20R configurations are intended to accommodate both 15 A and 20 A rated attachment plugs."

So I would read this as requiring a 5-20R receptacle for 15A attachment plugs to be used...
 

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Light Bender
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In a dwelling unit, can 15A receptacles go on a 20A circuit & breaker?

And could 20A receptacles go on a 30A circuit & breaker?

Seems obvious that they can, but are there rules prohibiting this?
Really? Seems obvious that they can NOT! :eek: [In Canada 26-700(2)]
From p. 454, Appendix B:

Rule 26-700, Diagrams 1 and 2
"Receptacles of the CSA 5-20R and 6-20R configurations are intended to accommodate both 15 A and 20 A rated attachment plugs."

So I would read this as requiring a 5-20R receptacle for 15A attachment plugs to be used...
That means that the receptacle can accommodate both 15 and 20 amp cord ends (plugs)
A good example is a 20 amp t-slot. You can plug a 15 amp cord or a 20 amp cord into it but it must be wired and fused for 20 amps.
 

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Light Bender
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Damn. I don't like that rule.

So A 15A receptacle must be on a 15A circuit, the only way around it is it to supply the circuit with a 20A breaker, min#12cu and a 5-20R receptacle?

I just don't get what the difference is with a 5-20R on that circuit versus a 5-15R.
Cause someone can plug a 20 amp device into a circuit that is protected by a 15 amp breaker and overload the circuit.
 

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Tikola Nesla said:
Damn. I don't like that rule. So A 15A receptacle must be on a 15A circuit, the only way around it is it to supply the circuit with a 20A breaker, min#12cu and a 5-20R receptacle? I just don't get what the difference is with a 5-20R on that circuit versus a 5-15R.
The more important question is, why do you need to?
 

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Tikola Nesla said:
For the sake of learning more. If any 15A cord end can plug into a 5-20R, which is protected by a 20A breaker, I don't understand why a 5-15R couldn't be protected by a 15A breaker.
A 5-15R is protected by a 15A breaker.

That's the point. Standards have been adopted to ensure that the cord configuration prevents you from over-drawing on that circuit. A 5-20R has a T slot to accept both 15A and 20A cord configurations, by only protecting that circuit with #14 wire and a 15A breaker, you are violating the most basic rules of sections 8 and 14.

You have a potential load of 20A, why on earth would you want to undersize the MCCB or wire?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Have you ever seen a kitchen appliance with a T-slot cord end?

Neither have I.
Precisely!!

What is the difference having a t-slot 20A receptacle, protected by a 20A breaker.. versus a non-t-slot 15A receptacle, protected by a 15A breaker.

Makes no sense.. there's no difference since the 5-20R is a 5-15R with a bonus slot that never gets used.
 

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Precisely!!

What is the difference having a t-slot 20A receptacle, protected by a 20A breaker.. versus a non-t-slot 15A receptacle, protected by a 15A breaker.

Makes no sense.. there's no difference since the 5-20R is a 5-15R with a bonus slot that never gets used.
The 5-20R is more than just a 5-15R with a bonus slot. It is rated for a higher current.

That's a big difference.
 

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I thought 15A receptacles were actually rated at 20A pass through in their listings. This requires further investigation!

Hypothetically, if a 15A receptacle were rated for 20A, should it be permitted to be put on #12 and 20A breaker?
Can you post to any links that have specifications like that? I don't remember seeing a pass through rating on any receptacles, but I don't look closely for that kind of thing since it violates code.
 

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Tikola Nesla said:
I thought 15A receptacles were actually rated at 20A pass through in their listings. This requires further investigation! Hypothetically, if a 15A receptacle were rated for 20A, should it be permitted to be put on #12 and 20A breaker?
I have no idea what you are trying to accomplish, other than trolling at this point. 5-20R costs what? $.50 more than a 5-15R ? You are not clever, you are violating code, plain and simple.

Let me help you discover the code book, it references important things like approved configurations.
Pay special attention to the 20A column, notice that a 5-15R is NOT listed there?

Oh noes, you can stop trying to find imaginary loopholes. Even if a 5-15R could handle up to 20A, it is probably not rated continuous at that and would be 80% or something.

Bottom line, if the code book says to use a 5-20R for 20A, use it.
 

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