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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I've tried to do some personal research online, but I really can't seem to find anything on the topic. I was curious if you intend on moving to another state, but that state doesn't currently have a Reciprocity with your state, what's the easiest way to obtain a license in that state? For example, in my personal situation, I intend on moving from Maine to Tennesee.
Would you just get licensed in another state until you are licensed in a state that shares one with Tennesee? For example, get licensed in New Hampshire, because Maine and New Hampshire have agreements, then get licensed in Arkansas, because they have one with New Hampshire, then finally get one from Arkansas to Tennesee? It seems like a very long and unnecessary process where I feel there's another simpler way that I don't see anywhere. I would be a Journeyman, at the time of moving if that's helpful.
 

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Have proof of experience and take the exams
I agree w/Southeast.. Been a while sense me personally being in Greater State of Tennesee.

*But recalling from memory, believing Tennesee was a "right to work" state. Maybe others in the forum can expand & contribute further into your posting..
 

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Ohh, so just completing and passing a simple test with proof of hours would be all it takes? Would my Journeymen status carry over as well or would that have to be earned, again?
 

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here's a strange idea ..... How about calling the authority that oversees the licenses in Tennessee and ASK THEM ??
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
here's a strange idea ..... How about calling the authority that oversees the licenses in Tennessee and ASK THEM ??
I did, I sent an email a week ago and called them, they're always busy or not answering. Thanks for assuming and being rude, though. Isn't this a large part of what forums are about? Answering questions you can't find answers to?
 

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Ohh, so just completing and passing a simple test with proof of hours would be all it takes? Would my Journeymen status carry over as well or would that have to be earned, again?
I am not sure journeyman status means anything other than it may be proof of hours needed. Take the test in Tennessee and be done with it
 
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So, I've tried to do some personal research online, but I really can't seem to find anything on the topic. I was curious if you intend on moving to another state, but that state doesn't currently have a Reciprocity with your state, what's the easiest way to obtain a license in that state? For example, in my personal situation, I intend on moving from Maine to Tennesee.
Would you just get licensed in another state until you are licensed in a state that shares one with Tennesee? For example, get licensed in New Hampshire, because Maine and New Hampshire have agreements, then get licensed in Arkansas, because they have one with New Hampshire, then finally get one from Arkansas to Tennesee? It seems like a very long and unnecessary process where I feel there's another simpler way that I don't see anywhere. I would be a Journeyman, at the time of moving if that's helpful.
You are doing it wrong. First off reciprocity exists regionally because it makes sense. Take for instance the town of Virgilina. It would be an awkward situation that I could work on your house but not your neighbors. So if I was a local electrician there I’d have both licenses and pay both state fees. NC has the hardest state test regionally so if I got my license in Virginia I would get a limited license in NC but if I got my license in NC I would get a full VA license. So it makes sense sometimes to decide which state test to take. But there’s very little reason for say NC to have reciprocity with say Maryland or Arkansas. Nobody is on the border or even close by.

Second there are three cases where you might work way out of the local area. First is if you are a manufacturer and doing service/support work. Most of these guys have their technicians working out if a suitcase. They cost $4000-6000 per day. Nobody wants them there one minute more than necessary. They come in to do service work, mostly troubleshooting, and usually the customer supplies as many helpers as they want. This is not permit work and if it got into that the service tech would just walk away. Second case is doing “factory installs”. Those companies will either sub out to local contractors they trust and use regularly or act like a regional contractor. With a true local contractor licensing is the local guys responsibility.

The third situation is regional/national contractors. To begin with they aren’t interested in any jobs with less than a 25-50% margin and at least $100-250k work scope. They will send in a SMALL team of a superintendent or two, planners, and usually a buyer. Maybe a small team of temps. First thing they do is hire themselves a crew of locals. It’s a larger job so licensing is just part of the logistics but whoever they use is local. The regional contractor just overseas the job. They use union halls, local temp agencies, and most keep lists of people they like and call them any time they are back in that area. Most are doing industrial jobs (power plants, paper mills, refineries) where nobody has ever pulled a permit in 50 years, and they won’t bid on permit jobs. They are not competitive in the markets where permits are usually needed anyways.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You are doing it wrong. First off reciprocity exists regionally because it makes sense. Take for instance the town of Virgilina. It would be an awkward situation that I could work on your house but not your neighbors. So if I was a local electrician there I’d have both licenses and pay both state fees. NC has the hardest state test regionally so if I got my license in Virginia I would get a limited license in NC but if I got my license in NC I would get a full VA license. So it makes sense sometimes to decide which state test to take. But there’s very little reason for say NC to have reciprocity with say Maryland or Arkansas. Nobody is on the border or even close by.

Second there are three cases where you might work way out of the local area. First is if you are a manufacturer and doing service/support work. Most of these guys have their technicians working out if a suitcase. They cost $4000-6000 per day. Nobody wants them there one minute more than necessary. They come in to do service work, mostly troubleshooting, and usually the customer supplies as many helpers as they want. This is not permit work and if it got into that the service tech would just walk away. Second case is doing “factory installs”. Those companies will either sub out to local contractors they trust and use regularly or act like a regional contractor. With a true local contractor licensing is the local guys responsibility.

The third situation is regional/national contractors. To begin with they aren’t interested in any jobs with less than a 25-50% margin and at least $100-250k work scope. They will send in a SMALL team of a superintendent or two, planners, and usually a buyer. Maybe a small team of temps. First thing they do is hire themselves a crew of locals. It’s a larger job so licensing is just part of the logistics but whoever they use is local. The regional contractor just overseas the job. They use union halls, local temp agencies, and most keep lists of people they like and call them any time they are back in that area. Most are doing industrial jobs (power plants, paper mills, refineries) where nobody has ever pulled a permit in 50 years, and they won’t bid on permit jobs. They are not competitive in the markets where permits are usually needed anyways.
Well, I was more so intending on moving to another state and living there, forever. Right now, it's either between Florida or Tennesee. I thought if you proved hours, like let's say I had over 8k hours and passed an exam, I could be approved to work as an electrician in the state and be granted a license? I wasn't looking to work out of state really, or through a company, I just really dislike the state I live in and want to move to a warmer one. Can't really ever seem to find a straightforward answer on getting licensed in a state far away.
 

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Dare I suggest applying with employers that operate in an industry sector that accepts certification, but not require licensing? (i.e. maintenance, non-permit work, etc)
 

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I thought if you proved hours, like let's say I had over 8k hours and passed an exam, I could be approved to work as an electrician in the state and be granted a license?
It depends on the state. I moved to Colorado three years ago and they "May" of excepted my hours but I had to apply to the board.

Dare I suggest applying with employers that operate in an industry sector that accepts certification, but not require licensing? (i.e. maintenance, non-permit work, etc)
This is what did. I work for the water department and they don't require paperwork.
 
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