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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am about six months into my 309A apprenticeship and would like some advice on Courses/Certificates etc. that I should be looking into. The company I work for is very diverse and so far I've worked on some Reno projects, bunch of panel changes, Converter repairs, Inverters, Transformers, New Gas Station, Street Lighting, Traffic Signals, Trailer Park Services, Signs....

My boss is setting up a few courses for us over the dead season through ESA;
Lock Out Tag Out and a few others
Also;
CPR
Boom Truck safety course I believe

I have;
WHIMIS
Fall Protection
DZ in the near future.

I'm thinking a welding course would be beneficial and I assume that you need a certification to operate Scissor Lifts? A pole climbing course would be good too, I've tried it out at the yard.

My apprenticeship is going very well so far and I want to be a very valuable and capable J-Man in the future. I can see that there could be a really good place for me in this company in the future and I want to make the most of it.

I will be discussing courses with my boss but wanted to get as many suggestions as possible.

Cheers
 

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Scissor and boom lift operating license is extremely important and in my opinion not having it is a handicap unless you work somewhere where you never need it. By the sound of it, you do need it.

Also don't get too starry eyed about your employer. You think it's a good company now, maybe it is. Don't think of it as a job for life, always have a backup plan and be prepared in case your boss decides to replace you with some clown who will work for less money.

Once you get more experienced, and maybe after you go to first year school(so you understand DC theory), take an intro to fire alarm course at Humber or a place like that. It's like $800 or something. FA is easy for the most part and too many electricians are afraid of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
don't get too starry eyed about your employer. You think it's a good company now, maybe it is. Don't think of it as a job for life, always have a backup plan and be prepared in case your boss decides to replace you with some clown who will work for less money.
Absolutely. This is also part of the reason I'm very determined to make sure I have the education and training that I require for this trade. I know someone that is just finishing their apprenticeship and has only been doing little resi jobs for years and now is realizing he doesn't have the skill set that a journeyman should have. For now things are good with my employer, he took me on which I will be forever thankful for because this is not an easy trade to get into (in this area at least). Industrial or Linesman work is also an interest to me so essentially I want to be as prepared for the future as I possibly can.

Thanks for the heads up on the Electronics course. That will help me to build some DIY guitar amps:thumbup:
 
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