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a big 10-4

where i do biz, it's a fairly huge problem

it's sometimes a real chore to weed them all out too

in the past, i've tried assessing N to G in the unenergized state, simply disconnect the MBJ and one can go after individual branch circuits right from the panel

not a perfect science, some considerations apply....but it's a start.....

~CS~
 

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Just how do you guys deal with "upgrades" to grounded receptacles in old buildings?

Mike Sokol
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2 bangers (which they still sell) & gfci's Mike

One of the fundamentals we do on older K&T buildings , much of which exists w/o any grounding, is to introduce it

Myself (as well as others here) usually come off the the MBJ and/or subpanel g-bar with #8 solid

We just bond anything metallic , plumbing, waste lines, furnaces, duct work, etc

This is were the real fun with RPBG and/or even reverse polarity bootleg appliances start becoming more apparent, or at least easier to assess

~CS~
 

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Holding a crucible of molten lead up over your head while dipping the wires into it was pretty crazy. Screw-on wire connectors were a great invention.
I was apprenticed to those guys

They used to run a small forge ,usually in the back of a pu truck, sometimes on the job..... kept a number of irons going while they ran up into attics to do as many joints as a hot one would do

I still have an old iron for porch cha cha

~CS~
 

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Back in my pile of old guitar amps I have a few with non-polarized or grounded plugs. These have a 200-volt capacitor hooked to a single-pole/double-throw switch which connects the amplifier chassis to either the hot or neutral power wire. It was a 50/50 guess which way was which, and you just switched it back and forth until it buzzed less and shocked you the least. On these old amps the "death cap" as it was called would sometimes short, so now your buzz-switch created a hard bond to the neutral or hot wire. Now it was 50/50 Russian Roulette. Yikes!!!

I also have a very old guitar amp with a non-polarized plug that as AC-DC capable (not the band). Just like an AC-DC tube radio in the old days of Edison DC power, there was no incoming power transformer. One side of the power cord (line or neutral - 50/50 guess) was bonded to the chassis, and the other side went to the string of tube filaments in series that added up to 120-volts. Again, a very dangerous thing which I never bring out of the closet since it could easily kill a visiting guitar player.

I only note this because I have a lot of experience on concert stages where a guitar player is complaining he's feeling a shock from his microphone, when I KNOW the PA system has been properly grounded and checked with an Ambrobe INSP-3, an NCVT and a DMM to the generator ground stake just to be sure. Hey, I take no chances with million dollar clients. In every case I've found an old guitar amp on stage that somebody just picked up at a pawn shop or flea market while on the road. And that's what was creating the shock hazard on the "microphone".

See, it's NOT always the electrician's fault. Sometimes it's the guitar player. ;)

Mike Sokol
I have an old mid 60's SUNN amp, durn thing even has a polarity switch

get it wrong & sparks fly from the mic

the band always blames me! :(

~CS~
 
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