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Residential Service entrance conductors in crawl space

5173 Views 6 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  ElectricMon
I am upgrading a electrical service to 200 amps. The service is overhead. I am planning to run conduit from the meter to the Panel along the siding and enter into the crawl space under the residence. It then will turn up into the bedroom to the panel which is next to the door. What i am not sure of is how far can the service entrance conductors run in the crawl space where it enters from outside to where it turns up to the panel. Right now it looks about 10 feet from where the SE conductors enter the crawl space to where it finally meets with the panel. There is no other place I can put the panel due to the stairwell, bathroom, Utility room with clearance issues and a gas meter also with clearance issues along that side of the residence. I am considering buying a meter with a disconnect in it but if I do so I won't be making much money on this project. Any info would be greatly appreciated.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I think I found the answer to my question. I just read the WAC rule (washington states code which supersedes the NEC) and the service equipment- disconnecting means says, "Inside location: When the service disconnecting means is installed inside the building or structure, it must be located so that the service raceway extends no more than 15 feet inside the building/structure."
It looks like I'm OK.
 

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I think I found the answer to my question. I just read the WAC rule (washington states code which supersedes the NEC) and the service equipment- disconnecting means says, "Inside location: When the service disconnecting means is installed inside the building or structure, it must be located so that the service raceway extends no more than 15 feet inside the building/structure."
It looks like I'm OK.
I like that rule.
 

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I've done the same thing just in conduit. Something interesting is that the rule can be gotten around by encasing the utility side in concrete and using a higher r insulation so states that don't have the benefit of that wac rule still have an option to get a panel somewhere specific without a meter main
 
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