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Does it need to be a continuous run from ground rod to cold water pipe then into panel.Of course having a jumper over your water meter,also should we play it safe and just install 2 ground rods.
 

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Does it need to be a continuous run from ground rod to cold water pipe then into panel.Of course having a jumper over your water meter,also should we play it safe and just install 2 ground rods.
IMO...from the panel to the rod, AND, from the panel to the water pipe. Tying them is series isn't as good as parallel.
 

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yea that makes sense to me ,if the last connection in line comes loose you lose your ground.thanks
You can do it that way it just isnt required.

What size service?
 

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true, you can, but a little extra , unnecessary effort
 

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Does it need to be a continuous run from ground rod to cold water pipe then into panel.Of course having a jumper over your water meter,also should we play it safe and just install 2 ground rods.
Mark the CW GEC is the main electrode and needs to be continuous from the neutral and sized according to the max. wire size of your service, #4 is fine for most 200A systems.

The run to the rod needs to be #6 CU if it's not subject to physical damage, otherwise #4 is required. A second rod is required unless you can show the first rod measures 25 ohms or less.

It can come from the CW electrode or the neural bar. The jumper to the second rod from the first can be done with a second "Acorn" on the first rod and need not be continuous.

As long as the run to the CW electrode is large enough you can jumper to the rods, so the're all in series.
 

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Mark the CW GEC is the main electrode and needs to be continuous from the neutral and sized according to the max. wire size of your service, #4 is fine for most 200A systems.

The run to the rod needs to be #6 CU if it's not subject to physical damage, otherwise #4 is required. A second rod is required unless you can show the first rod measures 25 ohms or less.

It can come from the CW electrode or the neural bar. The jumper to the second rod from the first can be done with a second "Acorn" on the first rod and need not be continuous.

As long as the run to the CW electrode is large enough you can jumper to the rods, so the're all in series.
25 ohms from where to where?
 

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From the permanent rod to the reference rods which came with your earth tester.

BTW, the permanent rod should not have the EGC connected.
Where , in the case of a new install would your permanent rod be located? And, I agree, the EGC has NOT a thing to do with ground...other than being at the same potential.
 

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Where , in the case of a new install would your permanent rod be located? And, I agree, the EGC has NOT a thing to do with ground...other than being at the same potential.
I called the first rod you drove the "permanent rod" and if you connect the EGC to the neutral bus before you run the test you get the "contribution" from other grounding electrodes (and POCO), so you're testing more than just that rod.

If you get a low reading on the first rod there is no need for the second.

BTW, the tester manufacturer's instructions also say to do it that way.
 

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From the permanent rod to the reference rods which came with your earth tester.

BTW, the permanent rod should not have the EGC connected.
Where , in the case of a new install would your permanent rod be located? And, I agree, the EGC has NOT a thing to do with ground...other than being at the same potential.
I called the first rod you drove the "permanent rod" and if you connect the EGC to the neutral bus before you run the test you get the "contribution" from other grounding electrodes (and POCO), so you're testing more than just that rod.

If you get a low reading on the first rod there is no need for the second.

BTW, the tester manufacturer's instructions also say to do it that way.
If you guys are referring to the conductor from the grounding electrode, EGC is not the term you are looking for.:no:

GEC is what you should be talking about.

If you are talking about EGC, I can't help you!:whistling2::)
 

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fertilizer distrubuter
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More on topic you can simply bond the water, or gas, or ufer, or your now redundant ground rod to any other grounding electrode. 250.64(F)The easiest is usually the steel frame of the building. You can also use a gas line and watch the dumdums squawk.
 
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