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I'm working for a GC right now and the project is a complete flip of a 2 unit house. I'm doing all of the wiring and am going off of the plans that an architect worked up. He was also hired by the GC. This is the first time I've worked for a GC on a project this size. So the wiring plans are garbage. It's basically just location of lights and switches, but very poorly put together. There is nothing showing any homeruns, how they want the circuits split up, receptacle locations, etc. Is this typically the situation? I've found myself planning and designing this whole project so it will pass inspection while also pleasing the customer and it's taken quite a bit of time.

Lesson learned I suppose.
 

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I'm working for a GC right now and the project is a complete flip of a 2 unit house. I'm doing all of the wiring and am going off of the plans that an architect worked up. He was also hired by the GC. This is the first time I've worked for a GC on a project this size. So the wiring plans are garbage. It's basically just location of lights and switches, but very poorly put together. There is nothing showing any homeruns, how they want the circuits split up, receptacle locations, etc. Is this typically the situation? I've found myself planning and designing this whole project so it will pass inspection while also pleasing the customer and it's taken quite a bit of time.

Lesson learned I suppose.
There is never wiring plans in Residential ! This is the only bit of brain work you will get with this kind of project so enjoy. :thumbup:
(and also how get payments out of that GC)
 

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Thanks. I do enjoy it. Next time I'll just need to add hours to my bid. $8300 to wire 2 units and a basement. Separate AC, furnaces, laundry, and 2 new 100 amp panels.
 

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I'm working for a GC right now and the project is a complete flip of a 2 unit house. I'm doing all of the wiring and am going off of the plans that an architect worked up. He was also hired by the GC. This is the first time I've worked for a GC on a project this size. So the wiring plans are garbage. It's basically just location of lights and switches, but very poorly put together. There is nothing showing any homeruns, how they want the circuits split up, receptacle locations, etc. Is this typically the situation? I've found myself planning and designing this whole project so it will pass inspection while also pleasing the customer and it's taken quite a bit of time.

Lesson learned I suppose.
I get prints for residential all the time.

The ones that do not show any electrical get bid for code minimum.
Prints that show only lighting get bid for code minimum on anything else.
Half the time I get prints showing all openings needed and where. I have never gotten any prints showing me how and where to run my circuits. That part is left up to me.
 

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THE "BIG RED MACHINE"
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Thanks. I do enjoy it. Next time I'll just need to add hours to my bid. $8300 to wire 2 units and a basement. Separate AC, furnaces, laundry, and 2 new 100 amp panels.
do you consider yourself good at roping houses? what little things do you do to save time labor etc.
 

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Thanks. I do enjoy it. Next time I'll just need to add hours to my bid. $8300 to wire 2 units and a basement. Separate AC, furnaces, laundry, and 2 new 100 amp panels.
I'm amazed you got $8300 out of a house flipper for all that work. :blink:
they're pretty damn cheap most of the time; what I hear allot is, "I got a book so I know what things cost." Whatever in the hell that means.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
BuzzKill said:
I'm amazed you got $8300 out of a house flipper for all that work. :blink: they're pretty damn cheap most of the time; what I hear allot is, "I got a book so I know what things cost." Whatever in the hell that means.
Materials and permits are about $3500. I should make out okay as long as it doesn't get dragged out too long. It's just me but I'm hoping to have it completely roughed in about 5-6 days. I'd be happy with that.
 

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Lep said:
do you consider yourself good at roping houses? what little things do you do to save time labor etc.
I can't really answer that question because I have very little experience wiring whole houses. First thing I did was plan my homeruns, mount all of the boxes, drill holes, and then start pulling. I have that romex wheel made be associated electrical products which makes pulling a breeze. I label all of the homeruns and hang them in front of the panel. Once I'm done running the cables I'll get the panel together. Any tips?

I've never really gotten to learn a whole lot from other electricians so I usually end up figuring out how to do things efficiently on my own. I do a ton of reading on here and on google which helps a ton. I hated working for $12 an hour for people who weren't interested in helping you learn. So, I quit, studied my butt off, got my license and starting doing residential work on my own. So far so good, but I usually end up spending my evenings on here trying to learn what I can.
 

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THE "BIG RED MACHINE"
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how do you like to run your home runs, how do you route your home run cable through the attic

make sure you get them
front loaded progress payments in your contracts
 

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Lep said:
how do you like to run your home runs, how do you route your cable through the attic.
I guess it depends on the layout. This time I started at the point of where the outlet or switch would be, and then pulled to the panel. In this case, I don't really have to route any wires through the attic. It's just a small crawl space. I do keep the outlets separate from the lighting circuits. That way if someone ever wants to add outlets in the future they can do so without turning off the lights.

I'm getting 60% after the rough, and 40% after the trim out.
 

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I've wired hundreds of houses.

Usually I put the service in first. Then I box the whole place and scream like hell if the tin guy hasen't installed the bath fans.

I haven't met a plumber ot tin man I liked. Well maybe. Any way if they are there I go home. They usually have every single bit of sh!t from their trucks strewn about the place. Ankle breakers everywhere. Won't work with them. Their pigs.

^^ thats pretty much my tip. Also those two trades have to be done before I start to wire. I will box but I enjoy kicking all their crap downstairs in the mud.

We want stairs. No lader to the second story or basement. Windows and doors in so the place can be locked up. GC sweeps the place up and tosses all the ankle breakers outside before I pull wire.

Canada, a great country. We get our wire on 75 meter rolls (spools). Maybe 3, 3 foot pieces of 3/4 emt nailed across the studs at at 18", 36", and 48 inches. #10 and #8 on the bottom rung. #12 and #14/3 second rung. #14/2 and the LV wire on the highest rung.

M18 cordless and I start at/ above the panel location and start drilling. Several holes up through the top plate and down into the basement.

I look around and drill a couple of circuits. In Canada we can put 12 boxes on a circuit. I'm a nice guy and usually stop at 10. I get bored drilling so after a couple of circuits I'll pull them in.

I never ever look for wire. Always at it. That means I might have a foot to a foot and a half at all boxes. The home runs I'll take to over the panel and I'll drop 8 feet through the floor. Right into the mud. Later I have enough to make my wiring look beautiful coming into the panel. Picture perfect because when the folks move in that's all they see.

I cut in/splice all the boxes after I've finished wiring everything. Drilling along the wall I drill low, using my knee to pressure the drill.

Last thing I do is the panel cut in. 4 foot ladder, coffee, takes me a day. Maybe 6 hours but she looks nice so that's the way it is.

I've never wired a house to code. Been doing resi since maybe 1980. Before that commercial but the bottom fell out of that in the early 80s. Anyway I pretty much wire every house like it was mine.

For me, and the Inspector... I wire at right angles. Never as the crow flies. They see a neat job they think good things about you as their day progresses and they look at crap jobs by others.

My 2 cents.

Edit: Get 80% on rough-in if you can. 75/25 is my bottom. Same builder only a couple of houses else he puts some dollars up front... even if I know him. I'm not a bank.

Edit 2: I haven't looked at a plan for years really. Just start wiring the thing in. They do tell me if they want pots, etc.

One other thing. The GC always takes a huge flow pen and marks out the kitchen on the floor. I won't scale that off the print unless they sign a 30 page document telling me it's the way it is on the print.

Edit 3: 8/3 and 10/3 get their own holes. Max of 3 wires in other holes. A three gang switch gets 3 holes above it, a two gang gets 2, a single gang gets one. Lv wires get their own hole.
 

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I'm working for a GC right now and the project is a complete flip of a 2 unit house. I'm doing all of the wiring and am going off of the plans that an architect worked up. He was also hired by the GC. This is the first time I've worked for a GC on a project this size. So the wiring plans are garbage. It's basically just location of lights and switches, but very poorly put together. There is nothing showing any homeruns, how they want the circuits split up, receptacle locations, etc. Is this typically the situation? I've found myself planning and designing this whole project so it will pass inspection while also pleasing the customer and it's taken quite a bit of time.

Lesson learned I suppose.
Just a couple words on a flip. "code minimum". I know it is hard to do crap work when you first start but is you want the job it is the way it is. Next time just tell him your busy.
 

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aftershockews said:
I get prints for residential all the time. The ones that do not show any electrical get bid for code minimum. Prints that show only lighting get bid for code minimum on anything else. Half the time I get prints showing all openings needed and where. I have never gotten any prints showing me how and where to run my circuits. That part is left up to me.
Yea that is just how it is,

I give them two prices, per plans and code engineered . That way they can compare apples to apples.

Well why is your per plan price almost the same as my other bid but this code engineered price says 4 grand ? What is that?

Well your plans have no smokes, required outlets, required switches and shows no exterior lights , they are required by code
 

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THE "BIG RED MACHINE"
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DaveEM
how do you route your home runs in the Attic?
 

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DaveEM
how do you route your home runs in the Attic?
Not sure what you mean but typically my home run goes to a light box. I will take it back towards the outside walls where it less than 3 feet of clearance, actually about a foot from the outside wall then run her back and at times across the house where I have the holes pre-drilled above the panel.

^^ this can cost. As previously mentioned I run at 90 degree angles and always maintain attic clearance so someone running around up there won't be in contact with any wiring. You can use a bit more wire using my method but it's what I like. Some will run a 1x4 down the center of the attic and run their wires along that but I'd just as soon blow away 20 feet of wire going to the outside.

You probably should listen to others... I am not a rich electrician but I'm a satisfied one and have never ever lost even a few minutes of sleep over electrical work I've done. I started the trade in 1968.

Edit: Also my switch wire will also go to the outside wall then back to the switch. I wonder how many rolls of extra wire I've used in my lifetime?
 

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IBEW L.U. 1852
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$8300 to wire 2 units and a basement. Separate AC, furnaces, laundry, and 2 new 100 amp panels.
:eek: Want to do some sub contract work for me??:laughing:
 

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I've wired hundreds of houses.

Usually I put the service in first. Then I box the whole place and scream like hell if the tin guy hasen't installed the bath fans.

I haven't met a plumber ot tin man I liked. Well maybe. Any way if they are there I go home. They usually have every single bit of sh!t from their trucks strewn about the place. Ankle breakers everywhere. Won't work with them. Their pigs.

^^ thats pretty much my tip. Also those two trades have to be done before I start to wire. I will box but I enjoy kicking all their crap downstairs in the mud.

We want stairs. No lader to the second story or basement. Windows and doors in so the place can be locked up. GC sweeps the place up and tosses all the ankle breakers outside before I pull wire.

Canada, a great country. We get our wire on 75 meter rolls (spools). Maybe 3, 3 foot pieces of 3/4 emt nailed across the studs at at 18", 36", and 48 inches. #10 and #8 on the bottom rung. #12 and #14/3 second rung. #14/2 and the LV wire on the highest rung.

M18 cordless and I start at/ above the panel location and start drilling. Several holes up through the top plate and down into the basement.

I look around and drill a couple of circuits. In Canada we can put 12 boxes on a circuit. I'm a nice guy and usually stop at 10. I get bored so after a couple of circuits I'll pull them in.

I never ever look for wire. Always at it. That means I might have a foot to a foot and a half at all boxes. The home runs I'll take to over the panel and I'll drop 8 feet through the floor. Right into the mud. Later I have enough to make my wiring look beautiful coming into the panel. Picture perfect because when the folks move in that's all they see.

I cut in/splice all the boxes after I've finished wiring everything. Drilling along the wall I drill low, using my knee to pressure the drill.

Last thing I do is the panel cut in. 4 foot ladder, coffee, takes me a day. Maybe 6 hours but she looks nice so that's the way it is.

I've never wired a house to code. Been doing resi since maybe 1980. Before that commercial but the bottom fell out of that in the early 80s. Anyway I pretty much wire every house like it was mine.

For me and the Inspector... I wire at right angles. Never as the crow flies. They see a neat job they think good things about you as their day progresses and they look at crap jobs by others.

My 2 cents.

Edit: Get 80% on rough-in if you can. 75/25 is my bottom. Same builder only a couple of houses else he puts some dollars up front... even if I know him. I'm not a bank.

Edit 2: I haven't looked at a plan for years really. Just start wiring the thing in. They do tell me if they want pots, etc.

One other thing. The GC always takes a huge flow pen and marks out the kitchen on the floor. I won't scale that off the print unless they sign a 30 page document telling me it's the way it is on the print.

Edit 3: 8/3 and 10/3 get their own holes. Max of 3 wires in other holes. A three gang switch gets 3 holes above it, a two gang gets 2, a single gang gets one. Lv wires get their own hole.
Leave it to a fellow Canuck to really try to help a guy out! Good description!!
 
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