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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have a class 1 div. 1 location outside our building where the fork lift operators fill their tanks. I am still in my first month at this place where they did not have much of a maintenance dept. when it came to electrical. there is currently an extension cord running to a start/stop that continues on to a motor. I am running a new circuit and 1/2 ridged outside and was wondering if it would be better to use threaded couplings or threaded unions to connect my conduit. it will not be buried and will be exposed to weather conditions.. Thoughts? I do plan on using an exp. proof junction and adding a seal off between the motor and switch and thought of adding an estop on the inside of the building to shut off at night and over the weekends. unless anyone one needs gas for their grill. :eek:
 

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Only use unions in places where it is absolutely impossible to screw the conduit together or at a motor or something might have to be removed for service.

Only bending stub 90s will make assembly much easier.
 

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Don't make the mistake I've seen some guys make on their 1st x-proof job. What I've seen done is they install a nipple (or whatever you are using) out of the motor JB, then screw a sealoff on, then bring the conduit to the sealoff and connect the conduit to the sealoff with a union, so the union is on the feed side of the sealoff.

The reason that's a mistake is you cannot replace the motor w/out breaking the conduit seal. Make sure the union is between the sealoff and the motor so you can disconnect the motor w/out breaking the conduit seal.
 

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I would assume NEC has similar rules to CEC. Here, you have to seal when leaving the classified area. No couplings, fittings etc between the seal and the classified area.
Your ESD would need a seal under our rules.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
(A) At the dispenser. You must install a listed raceway seal in each conduit run entering or leaving a dispenser. This seal has to be the first fitting after the conduit emerges from the earth or concrete (See Figure 6 ec514-06 514-09A).

(B) At the boundary. You must install a listed raceway seal in each conduit run that leaves a Class I, Division 1 or 2 location. [501.5(A)(4) or 501.5(B)(2)] You can’t use any unions, couplings, boxes or fittings (except explosionproof reducers) between the seal fitting and the point where the conduit leaves the Class I area (See Figure 7 ec514-07 514-09B 01).

[501.5(C)] The raceway seal must be accessible, and cannot contain splices. The total conductor area cannot exceed 25 percent of the cross-sectional area of rigid metal conduit, unless the seal fitting is approved for 40 percent fill (See Figure 8 ec514-08 514-09B 02 501-05C6).

Disconnects and controls

[514.11 ] Disconnects for dispensing stations need to allow for rapid response to a hose breakage or other event that creates a fuel-related fire or explosion hazard:

(A) Each circuit leading to or through a dispenser (including equipment for remote pumping systems) must have a clearly identified and readily accessible switch (located remote from the dispenser) to disconnect simultaneously all conductors of the circuit (including the grounded neutral conductor). You can’t use single-pole breakers with handle ties.

(B) Attended self-service stations must have the dispenser disconnect located no more than 100 ft from the dispenser, at a location acceptable to the AHJ.

(C) Unattended self-service stations must have the dispenser disconnect located more than 20 ft, but less than 100 ft, from the dispensers at a location acceptable to the AHJ. You must install additional emergency controls on each group of dispensers or the outdoor equipment used to control the dispensers to shut off all power to all dispensing equipment at the station.

[514.13] Remote pump control wiring for dispensers must be isolated to prevent electrical feedback. This means dispenser pump control wiring cannot supply more than one dispenser. Otherwise, it could cause electrical feedback when another dispenser is in operation (See Figure 9 ec514-09 514-13 cc514-02).
 

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[514.11 ] Disconnects for dispensing stations need to allow for rapid response to a hose breakage or other event that creates a fuel-related fire or explosion hazard:
That's expensive, usually I would just locate the disconnect outside of the classified area.
 

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Only use unions in places where it is absolutely impossible to screw the conduit together or at a motor or something might have to be removed for service.

Only bending stub 90s will make assembly much easier.
And at end devices, solenoids, switches, transmitters, etc... I've seen some awesome guys spin pipe into a unit heater, then fittings, then seal, then go through a wall...

I would assume NEC has similar rules to CEC. Here, you have to seal when leaving the classified area. No couplings, fittings etc between the seal and the classified area.
Your ESD would need a seal under our rules.
On end devices there are instances where you can put certain fittings after a seal.. Unions, LBYs and a coupling to change threads (ie - male stx connector to a male UNL).. If it was teck, you can also put a small body (GUAC14) after the connector seal to the device..
 
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