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Discussion Starter #1
Just tested out as a journeyman a year ago. I found a master who would sign off for me to obtain an elec. contr. lic., but would be pretty hands off. I had an opportunity awhile back to do a knob and tube rewire. I think the homeowner only expected to spend a few thousand on the whole thing. She had drawings, and I brought them before the master and he threw the number $7500 at me. I relayed this to customer, but she still wanted to haggle me down to $7k. I said I would draw up a quote (this included service, demo, rough in, and trim out for an historic 2500 sq. ft. 2 story). Later on, I consulted with another guy who had actually come w/ me to the job and had been looking over the prints for a day or so. He said a realistic number was in the $20k range. After some consideration, I decided this last guy (64 y.o. retired jman) was probably closer to the mark, and I got back with her with it. Of course she balked, but I didn't really want to lose my ass with a contract that would've been a nightmare to fulfill. Oh yeah, and my residential experience is very limited.

I guess I'd like some feedback:
Has anyone come across these sitautions?
Probably not realistic to expect to go out and do this job without strong financial backing and gameplan ( I had neither, but with a lot of time could've gotten a realistic bid)
Anyone do these k&t rewires; whats the flat rate per sq. ft? At $4/ft its still 10k + 2500 for svc, and $500 demo. that's 1300.
This is Houston, and we have a massive amount of cheap and unskilled labor, and I could've probably found someone with an apprentice license and/or subcontractor to do it on the cheap.
Anyone have experience with that?
 

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Just trying to get reward points while I'm slow.

2500 sq ft is not small for a rewire. Probably have lath and plaster walls, which is even worse, and diagonal bracing studs in the walls, which makes fishing a bear.

$7K is way off. $20K may be on the high side for your area, but is closer to the mark. It will probably go for nothing though as most do.
 

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Just tested out as a journeyman a year ago. I found a master who would sign off for me to obtain an elec. contr. lic., but would be pretty hands off. I had an opportunity awhile back to do a knob and tube rewire. I think the homeowner only expected to spend a few thousand on the whole thing. She had drawings, and I brought them before the master and he threw the number $7500 at me. I relayed this to customer, but she still wanted to haggle me down to $7k. I said I would draw up a quote (this included service, demo, rough in, and trim out for an historic 2500 sq. ft. 2 story). Later on, I consulted with another guy who had actually come w/ me to the job and had been looking over the prints for a day or so. He said a realistic number was in the $20k range. After some consideration, I decided this last guy (64 y.o. retired jman) was probably closer to the mark, and I got back with her with it. Of course she balked, but I didn't really want to lose my ass with a contract that would've been a nightmare to fulfill. Oh yeah, and my residential experience is very limited.

I guess I'd like some feedback:
Has anyone come across these sitautions?
Probably not realistic to expect to go out and do this job without strong financial backing and gameplan ( I had neither, but with a lot of time could've gotten a realistic bid)
Anyone do these k&t rewires; whats the flat rate per sq. ft? At $4/ft its still 10k + 2500 for svc, and $500 demo. that's 1300.
This is Houston, and we have a massive amount of cheap and unskilled labor, and I could've probably found someone with an apprentice license and/or subcontractor to do it on the cheap.
Anyone have experience with that?
As long as you think this way you'll never be able to make real money in this business.

You have to learn how to sell professionalism, not slavery.

Your game plan going into business should be that you will deliver a top of the line product at top dollar, and not care about burger king electrical does.

When a client wants to cut your price down to $7000 from $7500 and then another EC tells you the job is worth $20,000, you have a lot to learn about pricing the work, you're throwing away $13,000 to get this job:blink:

"My Electricians are licensed professionals and are background checked and are in uniform with many years of experience, you can be confident that your home is in the best hands the electrical trade can offer"

Sell high, and when they haggle----Raise the price.

Congratulations on passing the exam..:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
the walls were sheetrock and she was having it all torn down. the master's experience (he's no longer in business for himself) was from 20 years ago. It seems like he just doubled his 20 years ago rewire price. The journeyman who looked at the job had knob and tube experience but not a lot of bid estimate exp. bottom line-- cheap customer + inexperienced lawsuit = possible loss and/or lawsuit
 

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So with the sheetrock removed, you get a demo job, and studs already drilled !!! That would go a lot faster. I still think that will go for nothing if in open bidding. (Too many hungry Rats)
 

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A brand new 2500 sq ft house is more like 16k, and thats without demo. The drilled holes will be small and will most likely only be through the top plate. I would price that like a brand new house and then add a couple grand for demo, since it will take you a couple days. Plus you'll probably have to rig up some temp power off the existing service so the wood monkeys can go to town with their sawzalls.
 

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Just tested out as a journeyman a year ago. I found a master who would sign off for me to obtain an elec. contr. lic., but would be pretty hands off. I had an opportunity awhile back to do a knob and tube rewire. I think the homeowner only expected to spend a few thousand on the whole thing. She had drawings, and I brought them before the master and he threw the number $7500 at me. I relayed this to customer, but she still wanted to haggle me down to $7k. I said I would draw up a quote (this included service, demo, rough in, and trim out for an historic 2500 sq. ft. 2 story). Later on, I consulted with another guy who had actually come w/ me to the job and had been looking over the prints for a day or so. He said a realistic number was in the $20k range. After some consideration, I decided this last guy (64 y.o. retired jman) was probably closer to the mark, and I got back with her with it. Of course she balked, but I didn't really want to lose my ass with a contract that would've been a nightmare to fulfill. Oh yeah, and my residential experience is very limited.

I guess I'd like some feedback:
Has anyone come across these sitautions?
Probably not realistic to expect to go out and do this job without strong financial backing and gameplan ( I had neither, but with a lot of time could've gotten a realistic bid)
Anyone do these k&t rewires; whats the flat rate per sq. ft? At $4/ft its still 10k + 2500 for svc, and $500 demo. that's 1300.
This is Houston, and we have a massive amount of cheap and unskilled labor, and I could've probably found someone with an apprentice license and/or subcontractor to do it on the cheap.
Anyone have experience with that?
Why didn't you plan on hiring the cheap and unskilled labor?
 

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Had a very similar experience on a rewire recently. The customer scoffed at my price and kept trying to low ball everything saying "the other electrician was lower" (then where is he?). The final straw was when he said my price on the service was too high and that I should do it for $3000. It was a 6 unit building, the meter bank alone is over $3000. Long story short I walked away, told him good luck but I'm not your guy. These customers think they know what things cost but they don't have a clue. Don't let them play contractor for a day like they know best. If its going to be more grey hairs then dollars there will be other jobs out there with customers who are willing to pay a reasonable price for a licensed electrician.
 

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Prices vary across the country according to cost of living and other factors. A competitive bid in this area is $16,000 which is probably close to the same in your area.
 

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I did a 2-story whole-house rewire including demo of plaster in 2008 with a disconnect 100-amp OH service for approx. $30k (all conduit). Their decorator patched and painted for about $10k additional. The square footage was probably similar.

Edit to add: Sorry I missed the post that all the drywall would be removed. In that case it would be the same as new construction and I wouldn't bid on it. High-speed, cut-corner, low-bid, no-profit guys get that work in this area.
 
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