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Road side safety

2343 Views 8 Replies 8 Participants Last post by  Lone Crapshooter
Does anyone know where I could get info on road side safety?
Special equipment, safety vests, standards, flashing lights(yellow or white), signs etc?

I am looking at when you park your van next to the road to do work on something, pole light, j-box etc and the road is fairly close, or even you have to park on the road because of sidewalk access or even terrain.
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· RIP 1959-2015
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Does anyone know where I could get info on road side safety?
Special equipment, safety vests, standards, flashing lights(yellow or white), signs etc?

I am looking at when you park your van next to the road to do work on something, pole light, j-box etc and the road is fairly close, or even you have to park on the road because of sidewalk access or even terrain.

This might help.

http://www.osha.gov/doc/highway_workzones/index.html

http://onlinepubs.trb.org/onlinepubs/sar/sar_9.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
After reading through those, and others I am not finding the simple temporary 1 or 4 hour job solution, just the weeks long project type of heavy duty road construction. I did find the speed ratings for what class vests though.:thumbsup:
 

· Scotchkote Installer
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People are too busy texting and talking on the phone to be worried about some guy working on the side of the road..

Park one of these behind you.. only sure thing to keep the morons from running into you.. :thumbsup:

 

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Nothing official here, just experience from being on the street from time to time. Your state police should have info on what is allowed in your state for private service vehicles. Utility trucks are usually fully equipped, and are set up with what has been proven most effective. Look at what your DOT guys wear for visibility. Drill it into your guys never to get out of the vehicle on the street side if there is any possible way to avoid it, even if they have to go around the block. Always set the truck up as your guard, it's all you have. Wigwags are a lot more effective than a revolving light, but both is even better. If it is allowed in your area, you can set up a sign a short distance back from where you are working,let em hit the sign first- and sooner or later somebody will. Make yourself as visible as possible, the more fluorescent the better. Spend the money it takes to make yourself and your guys as safe as you can. Remember, you are always a target, do everything you can to make yourself hard to hit.
 

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Nothing official here, just experience from being on the street from time to time. Your state police should have info on what is allowed in your state for private service vehicles. Utility trucks are usually fully equipped, and are set up with what has been proven most effective. Look at what your DOT guys wear for visibility. Drill it into your guys never to get out of the vehicle on the street side if there is any possible way to avoid it, even if they have to go around the block. Always set the truck up as your guard, it's all you have. Wigwags are a lot more effective than a revolving light, but both is even better. If it is allowed in your area, you can set up a sign a short distance back from where you are working,let em hit the sign first- and sooner or later somebody will. Make yourself as visible as possible, the more fluorescent the better. Spend the money it takes to make yourself and your guys as safe as you can. Remember, you are always a target, do everything you can to make yourself hard to hit.
Don't make your light too bright or you might create the moth to a flame effect.

The MA State Police have very bright lights on their cars and it seems like every month there is an accident where they have someone pulled over at night on the shoulder of the road and they get rear ended by a tired or drunk driver.

They seem to be drawn into the light.
 

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Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices Part VI sections 6A-4 and 6A-6
I happen to have a copy from when I went through IMSA traffic signal certification.
If you are going to do allot of roadside work you may want to consider contracting out your safe work zone set ups.
Even if you contract your safe work zones set ups out you should a couple of people in your organization safe work zone certified.

The International Municipal Signal Association has classes in safe work zone.
www.imsasafety.org
 
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