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Type NM-B cable first began to be manufactured with color-coded jackets in 2001 to aid in identification of the conductor size. The color code that was introduced, which continues to be used today is as follows:

14 AWG – White
12 AWG – Yellow
10 AWG – Orange
8 AWG – Black
6 AWG – Black​

This color coding system was developed to aid those who sell, install, and inspect Type NM-B cable so that the cable size can easily be identified, to reduce mistakes resulting from the use of an incorrect conductor size.

It should be noted that this color coding system is not a requirement of NFPA 70, National Electrical Code® (NEC®) or UL 719, Safety Standard for Nonmetallic-Sheathed Cable. Type NM-B can be produced and sold without using this color code. As such, the print legend, which is required by the NEC®, should be used to verify the conductor size.

Extracted from NEMA Bulletin 94
 

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village idiot
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Anybody else noticed the color coded wire seems to be causing a rash of helpers that seem to not care what size the wire is or even about how to properly identify what it is?

"What wire should I pull over here, white or yellow?"
"Number 12"
"huh? white or yellow?"
"nevermind, yellow............" :(

Jeff
 

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Is there supposed to be color coding on type mc cable as well?
Dunno 'bout supposed to but there usually is.

An inked band with colors on the outside of the jacket every 6 feet or so (convenient eh?)

Back to the OT it is like purple pvc primer.(say that 3 times) You can get it clear but when that is what the plg inspector is looking for, why make life harder. Dunno if that is plg code or not tho.
 

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Type NM-B cable first began to be manufactured with color-coded jackets in 2001 to aid in identification of the conductor size. The color code that was introduced, which continues to be used today is as follows:

14 AWG – White
12 AWG – Yellow
10 AWG – Orange
8 AWG – Black
6 AWG – Black​

This color coding system was developed to aid those who sell, install, and inspect Type NM-B cable so that the cable size can easily be identified, to reduce mistakes resulting from the use of an incorrect conductor size.

It should be noted that this color coding system is not a requirement of NFPA 70, National Electrical Code® (NEC®) or UL 719, Safety Standard for Nonmetallic-Sheathed Cable. Type NM-B can be produced and sold without using this color code. As such, the print legend, which is required by the NEC®, should be used to verify the conductor size.

Extracted from NEMA Bulletin 94
Okay. :rolleyes:
 

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I own stock in FotoMat!
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If it cannot be produced or sold without those colors, it sure can be installed.

A long time ago, I started using about 3-4 feet of 12-3 between the disposal switch and the recep so I could have a split-wired recep under the sink. I did this so one half the duplex would be hot all the time for a future hot-water dispenser. I went out and bought several rolls of 12-3 at a time when it was still white. I still have 4 full rolls and the better part of another roll still sitting in the shop.

I also still have some 10-2 and 10-3 that is white.... just waiting to get used up. I've installed some for ACs and dryers, and the inspector dinged me for it until I showed him the jacket markings.
 

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A long time ago, I started using about 3-4 feet of 12-3 between the disposal switch and the recep... I went out and bought several rolls of 12-3 at a time when it was still white. I still have 4 full rolls and the better part of another roll still sitting in the shop.
Do you pull individual 12-2's for the SABC's? Using 12-3 would sure burn up those rolls before too long.
 

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village idiot
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If it cannot be produced or sold without those colors, it sure can be installed.

A long time ago, I started using about 3-4 feet of 12-3 between the disposal switch and the recep so I could have a split-wired recep under the sink. I did this so one half the duplex would be hot all the time for a future hot-water dispenser. I went out and bought several rolls of 12-3 at a time when it was still white. I still have 4 full rolls and the better part of another roll still sitting in the shop.

I also still have some 10-2 and 10-3 that is white.... just waiting to get used up. I've installed some for ACs and dryers, and the inspector dinged me for it until I showed him the jacket markings.
Have you checked the expiration date on that wire? It's probably well outdated by now and no good to use. ;)

Jeff
 

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Yes, I have had that happen. You buy from one supplier (Nexans) which sells in colors and apprentices go brain dead and cant tell 14 awg from 12 awg when you buy from the supplier that only sells white NMD. Colored wire is no different than anything automatic that save us from thinking.
 
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