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I'm a little confused about kitchen refrigerator requirements. 550.12(B) calls out 20 amp small appliance circuits but implies in exception no. 3 that a fridge is permitted to be on an individual 15A branch circuit. But is it required to be? It makes sense for a large fridge to have its own breaker ... but what about a small beverage fridge? Could this use part of one of the small appliance breakers, or could it even be on another general wall outlet breaker? Thanks!
 

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The refrigerator requirement for mobile homes is the same as it is for dwellings. The refrigerator can be on the small appliance branch circuit or it can have a separate 20 or 15 amp circuit. Most refrigerators draw 6-8 amps at most. That being said we usually run a 20 amp circuit for the refrigerator
 
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Old Grumpy Bastard
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The refrigerator requirement for mobile homes is the same as it is for dwellings. The refrigerator can be on the small appliance branch circuit or it can have a separate 20 or 15 amp circuit. Most refrigerators draw 6-8 amps at most. That being said we usually run a 20 amp circuit for the refrigerator
But if you read the original post I think he was looking for a requirement on a mini fridge (wine cooler). Which isn't normally on it's own circuit unless it's permanently installed in a wet bar or other such location unlike a standard refrig that is in a fixed kitchen location.

I've run a separate circuit in recent times for built in wine coolers and bar refriges.
 
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The few houses I've done, I always put food safety equipment on its own circuit but I'll put a light of some sort on it too. The reason being that if it trips, the light won't work and hopefully it'll be found before the food spoils.
 

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definitions:
Branch Circuit, Individual.
A branch circuit that supplies only one utilization equipment. (CMP-2)


Mobile and manufactured homes
Branch circuits
550.12(b)
(B)Small Appliances.
In kitchens, pantries, dining rooms, and breakfast rooms, two or more 20-ampere small-appliance circuits, in addition to the number of circuits required elsewhere in this section, shall be provided for all receptacle outlets required by 550.13(D) in these rooms. Such circuits shall have no other outlets.
Exception No. 1: Receptacle outlets installed solely for the electrical supply and support of an electric clock in any the rooms specified in 550.12(B) shall be permitted.
Exception No. 2: Receptacle outlets installed to provide power for supplemental equipment and lighting on gas-fired ranges, ovens, or counter-mounted cooking units shall be permitted.
Exception No. 3: A single receptacle for refrigeration equipment shall be permitted to be supplied from an individual branch circuit rated 15 amperes or greater.

Countertop receptacle outlets installed in the kitchen shall be supplied by not less than two small-appliance circuit branch circuits, either or both of which shall be permitted to supply receptacle outlets in the kitchen and other locations specified in 550.12(B).

Looks like the basic rule is two or more 20a circuits. So if you were to add more than two, it would need to be 20a? The exception is if you add one for the refrigerator, it can be 15a. But it has to be a single receptacle (not duplex) on a dedicated circuit. Dedicated because it calls for an “individual branch circuit”.

So the refrigerator can be on one of the two or more 20a circuits. But if you put it on a separate 15a circuit, it can’t feed other things.
 

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But if you read the original post I think he was looking for a requirement on a mini fridge (wine cooler). Which isn't normally on it's own circuit unless it's permanently installed in a wet bar or other such location unlike a standard refrig that is in a fixed kitchen location.

I've run a separate circuit in recent times for built in wine coolers and bar refriges.
I wired a small under cabinet wine cooler and it was like 60 watts or something very insignificant and the instructions called for a separate cir. No... I did not LOL
 

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I've run a separate circuit in recent times for built in wine coolers and bar refriges.

I do that also. Wouldn't want the possibility of something else on the circuit causing the breaker to trip
 

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Old Grumpy Bastard
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I wired a small under cabinet wine cooler and it was like 60 watts or something very insignificant and the instructions called for a separate cir. No... I did not LOL
Oh the shame.........
 

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Old Grumpy Bastard
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I've run a separate circuit in recent times for built in wine coolers and bar refriges.

I do that also. Wouldn't want the possibility of something else on the circuit causing the breaker to trip
EXACTLY!

"Wouldn't want the possibility of something else on the circuit causing the breaker to trip"
 
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I'm a little confused about kitchen refrigerator requirements. 550.12(B) calls out 20 amp small appliance circuits but implies in exception no. 3 that a fridge is permitted to be on an individual 15A branch circuit. But is it required to be?
IMHO, it's about allowing the fridge mfr to have some say in the OCP.... much like other hard-wired cooling/refrigeration equipment. Units with very low current demand likely have additional internal protection.
 
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