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Discussion Starter #1
I'm currently running PVC coated rigid conduit. Just 3/4 and half inch right now.

Does anyone have any tips to thread easier without tearing the coating?

I am using a piece of sheet metal sandwiched around the pipe in the vice (not my idea, this was already in place). This is being done with a pony.
 

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Conservitum Americum
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I thought you could only thread on a Ridgid 300 (the stand machine)

I do know there are special cutters that are sold for PVC coated rigid conduit, I don't know if there for a pony cutter (hogs-head).

Maybe a phone call to a knowledgable sales reps in the AM?

I'm sure that someone will straight'n me out if I've given some mis-direction.
 

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CADPoint said:
I thought you could only thread on a Ridgid 300 (the stand machine)

I do know there are special cutters that are sold for PVC coated rigid conduit, I don't know if there for a pony cutter (hogs-head).

Maybe a phone call to a knowledgable sales reps in the AM?

I'm sure that someone will straight me out if I've given some mis-direction.
I use the Ridgid 1224 pipe threader. There's no cutting back of the PVC coating with this machine. I'm sure others are the same.

I believe they do sell special dies for the pony to cut the PVC coating before the threads cut in. Probably cheaper to just cut it back yourself though.
 

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I'm currently running PVC coated rigid conduit. Just 3/4 and half inch right now.

Does anyone have any tips to thread easier without tearing the coating?

I am using a piece of sheet metal sandwiched around the pipe in the vice (not my idea, this was already in place). This is being done with a pony.
Try scoring the PVC at the normal thread length, and stop in time. Pad the vise and use plenty of oil so as not to torque the pipe into rotating.
 

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Cut the coating off with razor knife before you thread. It doesn't matter if you **** up the coating, whenever you run robroy you should buy a few cans of o-cal spray (liquid robroy repair spray) problem solved...
 

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We clamp it in the vise like normal? The only thing we do different for the pony was we had the dies machined out so they slipped over the pvc coating. We marked these special dies with yellow paint.

You don't want to mix them up with regular dies, because once you machine them they don't work worth a crap on regular rigid.

Don't forgot the rob roy paste for touching up the conduit. You will need it, eventually.
 

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RIVETER said:
Try scoring the PVC at the normal thread length, and stop in time. Pad the vise and use plenty of oil so as not to torque the pipe into rotating.
That's a good method. After you ring the pipe with your knife, make some more score marks length wise out to the end of the pipe. This will let the coating "chip" off rather than clog up the die.
 

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tar it

Tar it. When I was a 2nd yr app 10 years ago we painted tar on the pipe where the threader damaged the pvc coating. Pipe was all going under the groung floor slab anyways. We did the same at all of the couplings. I cant honestly say if that is the right or wrong way to do it but it all got inspected before the pour. I haven't seen pvc coated rigid since. Has anyone else gone this route?
 

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Cut the coating with a razor knife lengthwise into strips. It will chip off as it is threaded. Called "penciling".
 

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Electron Flow Consultant
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Buy the right tools. Get the correct dies for your 700 and a clam shell pipe vise with the right jaws. Unless you're not looking for repeat business, then hack it up.
 

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There was just a thread on this a few weeks ago.

The goal is to NOT damage the coating. That's why you use the right tools, there made to not damage it.

Ran some stubs out of a duct bank last couple of days.
 

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They make a tristand vice with special teeth to hold it if you are using a pony. You can clamp it with two pieces of angle iron in a regular chain vice but it's pretty tiresome if you have more then a few pieces to do. As far as cutting the coating off you shouldn't really have to except to trip the little bit the dyes leave.
 

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antisocial group ******
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OK,

I hate to date myself, but the last time I ran Robroy they had a special strap wrench kind of thing, and a cap with a razor blade you spun around the end of the pipe.

That scored the coating to the right depth.

Then you put a chinese finger thing over the pipe, clamped it into the threader, deburred, threaded (oil spraying all over the floor, thats important) then you removed the pipe, found out the chinese finger thing wrecked the coating, then slip and fall on the oil covered floor.

Try again 10 times, get same result, then tell boss "f*** you, I quit".

Thats how you properly cut and thread Robroy.

BTW, what is this spray on stuff? I know we did not have that....
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Thank you for the replies everyone.

For clarity, it's the vice clamp spot giving me trouble not the threaded point.

There was just a thread on this a few weeks ago.
Forum search must be broken. All I found was a vague thread from 2010 inquiring about what it was and the price.

That's why you use the right tools, there made to not damage it.
Yes, unfortunately for me I won't be using theym.
 

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Thank you for the replies everyone.

For clarity, it's the vice clamp spot giving me trouble not the threaded point.


Forum search must be broken. All I found was a vague thread from 2010 inquiring about what it was and the price.


Yes, unfortunately for me I won't be using theym.
Then your best option is to not do that kind of work. If you have to, I would use some short pieces of angle iron in the tri vise, this will minimize the damage. If you just rely on the chain, you'll have to tighten it down so much that it really digs into the coating. Make sure you seal the threads with the touch up paint as well, per manufacturers install instructions.
 

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To make a protector for your vise clamps, take a six inch long piece of galvanized conduit one size larger than the pvc coated conduit and slit it in half length lengthwise into two complete halves. Sandwich the pvc coated in between the halves and clamp in the vise. The pvc is pinched by the smooth grc instead of the vise jaws. Make sure to grind all of the sharp edges off of the grc pieces. We would tighten the vise jaws with an 18" stilson to get enough leverage so the pvc didn't slip. I'll try to post a pic if I didn't explain it good enough. Also, have a machine shop machine out the leader end of a set of dies. If you don't have a lot of threading, you can reverse the dies as if you had to make a thread flush to the floor. Some of Ridgids' dies are reversible, some are not. Ridgid has instructions on reversing them. Wouldn't recommend the reverse dies if you have a lot of threading though. It's hard to start a straight thread cut.
 

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Yes yes good Ol robroy. The dies that peel it back are best. The ocal patching is like liquid electrical tape. This reseals the PVC coating and the spray matches the color.

You got to get the vise with the brass clamps. Get it tight enough and the pipe won't spin.
 

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Maybe, if you take a blade width twice again at least down one side of each piece.
This would account for the compression of the materal.

Cool...

...take a six inch long piece of galvanized conduit one size larger than the pvc coated conduit and slit it in half length lengthwise into two complete halves.
Could they hang the threader anything father out?
 
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