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Safety with electricity

Dressed for Success!

http://www.waltonemc.com/SAFETY_safety.htm

Electricity is very safe when you follow a few simple rules:
  • Stay away from Walton EMC equipment, which includes poles, guy wires, substations, underground transformers and trucks working on lines.
  • Stay away and keep others back from fallen power lines (including telephone and cable TV lines). Call us immediately if you see downed lines.
  • Keep all objects away from power lines. Ladders, antennas and kites are fatal when in contact with a "hot" power line.
  • Never touch a person who is in contact with a live power line.
  • Plant trees away from overhead power lines and underground transformers.
  • Don't build or construct anything under overhead power lines.
  • When you see our crews and equipment along roadsides, slow down and proceed with care.
  • If someone comes to your home as a Walton EMC employee, ask for identification and look for our logo on their vehicle. If in doubt, call our office for confirmation. All WEMC employees carry ID cards.
  • State law requires you to call the Utilities Protection Center (800/282-7411) before you do any type of digging or work adjacent to underground or overhead power lines. We'll come out, spot our lines and help you avoid an expensive or dangerous situation.
Dressed for Success
Walton EMC Line Technician Chad Wilkes knows better than to go to work half-dressed. He has special clothing and tools that allow him to work on live power lines and do his job safely.

But you don't have the same outfit Chad does. That's why you should never try to touch any utility line, even if you think it's dead.

1. Hard Hat-Protects head from falling
objects and bumps. Also insulates head in case of electrical contact.

2. Safety Glasses-Protects eyes from debris, flying objects and other hazards.

3. Rubber Sleeves-Protects shoulders and arms from electrical contact.

4. Rubber Gloves-Insulates hands and fingers from live electrical circuit. Allows line technicians to repair lines without cutting off your power.

5. Leather Protectors-Protects rubber gloves from punctures.

6. Rubber Overshoes-Insulates feet from electrical current.

7. Fire Resistant Shirt-Protects against flames, flash fire and electric arc.


8. Climbing Belt-Securely supports line technician's weight when climbing poles. Also holds tools and supplies to free hands as necessary.

9. Fiberglass Extendable Stick-telescopes to 30 feet and allows line technician to perform some tasks from the ground.

Walton EMC By Laws and Service Rules

All content and images are property of Walton EMC and may not be duplicated without express written consent.
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Nice post, Joe. Looks like every lineman I've ever seen.

I do a small amount of linework, and own the same PPE. Don't have a 30' extendo pole, but I do have an 18 footer.
 

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Senior Member
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808 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
More

Nice post, Joe. Looks like every lineman I've ever seen.

I do a small amount of linework, and own the same PPE. Don't have a 30' extendo pole, but I do have an 18 footer.
Thanks, here's more:

Electrocution

Electrocution is a significant hazard in the electrical industry. Below are links to resources with solutions for electrocution hazards.
  • Construction. OSHA eTool.
  • Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout). OSHA Safety and Health Topics Page.
  • Lockout-Tagout Interactive Training Program. OSHA eTool. Provides requirements and suggestions for proper lockout/tagout methods.
  • Electrical Safety. National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Safety and Health Topic. Links to several useful NIOSH alerts and reports, and an electrical safety training manual.
  • Accident Summary No. 17. OSHA Fatal Facts Accident Report. Provides information on an investigation of an electrical fatality involving a crane boom making contact with a live power line. Includes recommendations for preventing future accidents.
  • Accident Summary No. 60. OSHA Fatal Facts Accident Report. Provides information on an OSHA investigation of an electrical fatality involving a worker who was shocked while on a ladder. Includes recommendations for preventing future accidents.
  • For additional information, see OSHA's Safety and Health Topics Page on:
Electrical Fire

Below are resources with solutions for electrical fire hazards.
  • Surge Protection at Home - Implementing the Right Line of Defense. Balmes, Brian, Siemans Energy & Automation. Provides information on protecting homes against electrical surges and anomalies, information what specifically to protect, and suggestions for choosing protective equipment.
  • Galan, Steve A. and Kenneth R. Vessey. "Extinguishing Flammability Fears With GR-326-CORE Flame Testing." Cabling Business Magazine, (2003, November), 101 KB PDF, 4 pages.
 
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