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I'm considering to rent or buy scissor lift or vertical master lift.
especially, Hy-brid HB1230 vs Genie GR-12

1. Have you guys used Hy-brid lift? HB1230? or heard from anyone? I'm wondering the performance.

2. Also, I'm confused with these two, scissor vs vertical master lift...
Can anyone explain what are the difference or pros/cons...?
 

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Old Grumpy Bastard
GOV/MIL contracting
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Scissor lift generally takes a larger footprint and is harder to get in smaller places. On the plus side it is very stable and takes a heavier payload.

Vertical lift is lighter, easier to transport, a real light bulb changers dream. If you are hanging fixtures or let's say drilling at or near max height, I pray you have no balance issues or fear of falling. I blew a seal by the action of just pulling on a wrench on a Genie lift, freaked me out and I have not liked them since.

If you are hanging conduit or ridgid pipe, hanging fixtures that could take two guys, need to have a toolbag and supplies onboard or doing real work at height a scissor lift is your golden ticket. If you are just doing maintenance (a ballast is your heaviest lift) and not concerned with construction go for a Genie lift and hire the lightest guys you can find. Look at the specs, the Genie may not lift as much weight as your needs may require.
 
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Old Grumpy Bastard
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Welcome aboard! Just read it's your first post.
 
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The length and width on the two units you posted are about equal so one is not more maneuverable than the other in this case.

Scissor lifts raise via a scissoring action of the support beams. Mast lifts raise via a sort of telescoping mast. In most cases the scissor lifts are more stable when you are standing in them. The one you linked though is so small this might not be the case.

In the case of the two you mentioned I would go with the scissor lift. The cantilevered platform is in valuable in crowded places. With the maneuverability being about equal the scissor lift will get you better ceiling access in crowded places. I'm not familiar with that brand though...

One last thought, if at all possible get in each one and actually use it. Either one out both might be too wiggly to consider.

Oh yeah like Mech said be sure to double check the weight capacity to be sure it can safely do what you want. Height too, they only go up a dozen feet. Ok for office lights I guess but not much else.

Sent from my C6725 using Tapatalk
 

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RENT first.

It's the only way to be sure.

This is a decision you can't make out of a book, catalogue, or Web forum.

BTW, MOST fellas end up forever renting -- as they just can't make a purchase pencil out.


 

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Rent what you need for each job. Have them drop it off and pick it up. Have them maintain it. Have them hold the liability for someone getting hurt because an exact procedure (maintenance, inspection, etc.) wasn't followed. Have them worry about something going wrong. Get the exact lift that you need for each job.

There's more benefits to renting that I am forgetting.

If you find yourself always renting the same exact lift, then you may want to do the math on buying one vs. renting. But it's a big investment so make sure it's what you need.

And remember, even the big contractors with the capital to buy lifts, store them, and pay staff to maintain them still usually rent.
 

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It needs to work out money wise. I have a scissor lift and a fellow friend electrician has a bucket truck. We swap when needed. I like the stability of a scissor lift although I never tried the other one.
 

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Electrical Contractor
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We have both a JLG 1930 scissor lift and an older vertical lift
The scissor lift gets used most of the time. Bigger work platform, way more stable, but needs more room. Can pretty well every thing he have to off of it.
The vertical lift on the other hand has a smaller basket, which we had modified to fit thru 2x4 grid. Very handy for those high roofs and low ceilings. Great for changing bulbs and being substantially lighter on gym floors.Also doesn't need as much room to operate in.
Don't do much pipe etc off of it, but it has come in handy for feeding wire for some conduit pulls
We used a few JLG 1230es on a job and the general consensus was that it would a great machine in places like shopping malls, where maneuverability was tight and ladder use impracticable
As stated, the machine has to earn it's cost.
 

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Old Grumpy Bastard
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I didn't look at the specs or pics of either unit before commenting but had an idea in my mind of which units they were, I wa soff a tad but it's been awhile for me.

As for rent or buy, never buy what you can borrow, never buy what you can lease, with lifts if you can rent do so. Liability on lifts can be killer for a small company. Then you also need to think of transporting your lift to a job as opposed to having one delivered.

I stand by the Genie being more a bulb changer. That ones does look more stable than the one I busted.
 

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I have spent a lot of time in the gr20 lifts and they are good solid machines and very maneuverable. I've also had about 6 of those hybrid lifts for about 6 months, I like the low deck vs a regular scissor lift for ease of getting in and out but they broke down more than any lift I've ever seen.
 

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Rent what you need for each job. Have them drop it off and pick it up. Have them maintain it. Have them hold the liability for someone getting hurt because an exact procedure (maintenance, inspection, etc.) wasn't followed. Have them worry about something going wrong. Get the exact lift that you need for each job.

There's more benefits to renting that I am forgetting.

If you find yourself always renting the same exact lift, then you may want to do the math on buying one vs. renting. But it's a big investment so make sure it's what you need.

And remember, even the big contractors with the capital to buy lifts, store them, and pay staff to maintain them still usually rent.

This is what we small contractors do.
Like Hack mentioned, you might need six different types of lifts in a years time.
I really couldn't hang my hat on just one particular type.
I will say that if you are faced with renting one type of lift for six months or more, you might consider buying one on credit, making the payments out of the job revenue, and then decide if you will keep it or not.
That way, if you spend $12,000 on rent, you might have just bought a small scissor lift.
Personally, I would not want to store or maintain them unless I had the space and mechanical skills to repair them.
 

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Old Grumpy Bastard
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Does anyone use Ballymore lifts still? They used to be popular for weight, portability, and fitting up through a 2x4 ceiling grid.
 

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I have 2 older scissors lifts. Just bought new batteries for them at about a grand. Well worth owning them though as sometimes they might sit on a job unused for a few months or even more. Paid for themselves many times over. No way I buy a new one though unless I was going to use one every single day.
Just priced one new $15K, but a used/ reconditioned 06 JLG is around $5K. I know which one I would buy.
That being said I just rented one for $300 a month, hard to buy one for that.
 

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I used to own my own Grove lift. It was handy at the time, but maintaining it put renting in a favorable light. If I had to do it again, I would lease it.
 
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I've seen some deals on Craigslist but until you're either wealthy or a larger operation, rent/leasing might make the best cents. Wink wink
 

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The kicker with owning your own -- and old -- lifts: the price of repair parts is TO THE MOON.

Further, few fellows have any working knowledge of hydraulics.

The acid of the batteries fouls up the works -- rather constantly.

Further, the troops -- invariably -- ignore even the most basic maintenance -- starting with keeping the batteries hydrated and charged.

&&&&

The single biggest problem with owning a lift -- is forcing yourself to use the WRONG lift -- yours -- because you own it -- rather than the one that fits the job best.

It's for THIS reason that the Big Boys never want to own the gear. They simply HAMMER the rental companies down to sweet rental rates.

The same leverage explains why this or that CADDY product is a big seller with the Big Boys -- and seems priced in orbit for the small guys.

{ The small guys have one edge: they don't need to carry so much dead weight -- both in the office and in the field. You would not BELIEVE the financial beatings that the Big Boys take from loser troopers. }
 
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