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Discussion Starter #1
Had a call yesterday for a house with power fluctuations.

Got there and started doing some testing. No matter how small of a load there was one leg dropped to 90 volts or less and the other would spike to over 140 volts.

I know, classic neutral problem.

So, start doing the normal checks. Neutral in panel, neutral in meter, etc.

Overhead service to meterbase and SEU cable to main breaker panel.

All connections are tight so I suspected it was a utility problem. Spoke with the utility technician and he verified he checked all connection on the pole and re tapped connections at the riser.

So, the only thing to do was replace the SE cable.

No place open yesterday had any 4/0 in stock so I had to wait until today to make the repairs.

When I was removing the old SE, the entire jacket was FULL of water.
Had to slit the jacket open so I could cut the cables to remove them. There was so much water released that I was forced to go home and change after I finished the job.

We see very few jobs done in SE around here and from the ones I run across, they are similar to this.

I'm just wondering if this is a common scenario in the NE and if so why is it still an allowed method?
 

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So, was the SE bad?
 

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I've seen that from time to time and it always results from poor installation - improper weatherhead installation or not using caulk around the SE connector on the meter socket. On the other hand I've seen cable installations that last decades without an issue because they were installed correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've seen that from time to time and it always results from poor installation - improper weatherhead installation or not using caulk around the SE connector on the meter socket. On the other hand I've seen cable installations that last decades without an issue because they were installed correctly.
the riser wasn't SE, it was pvc and individual cables

the SE was between the meter base and the main panel
 

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Well , ive only seen it 2 times and both cases the seu was decades old chit happens. Both times the water ended up in the panel.
 

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I have seen this a few times but when I look close at the cable you can see the outer sheeting was damaged . Usually when it was originally installed and it failed years later .
 

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Had a call yesterday for a house with power fluctuations.

Got there and started doing some testing. No matter how small of a load there was one leg dropped to 90 volts or less and the other would spike to over 140 volts.

I know, classic neutral problem.

So, start doing the normal checks. Neutral in panel, neutral in meter, etc.

Overhead service to meterbase and SEU cable to main breaker panel.

All connections are tight so I suspected it was a utility problem. Spoke with the utility technician and he verified he checked all connection on the pole and re tapped connections at the riser.

So, the only thing to do was replace the SE cable.

No place open yesterday had any 4/0 in stock so I had to wait until today to make the repairs.

When I was removing the old SE, the entire jacket was FULL of water.
Had to slit the jacket open so I could cut the cables to remove them. There was so much water released that I was forced to go home and change after I finished the job.

We see very few jobs done in SE around here and from the ones I run across, they are similar to this.

I'm just wondering if this is a common scenario in the NE and if so why is it still an allowed method?
Was this a really long run of SE cable never heard anything like that usually it just goes right through into the panel. We keep about 15 feet in stock in case we need in to get to a breaker panel but will do everything I can to not use it.
 

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I have seen this a few times but when I look close at the cable you can see the outer sheeting was damaged . Usually when it was originally installed and it failed years later .
I saw a recent install done by another local electrician that used SE and it had holes all over it. Looked like he was creating job security or something.

Maybe I am the dumb one doing a conduit riser. :jester::laughing::no:
 

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I've never seen conduit with water in it. Never.....:whistling2:











So, this must just be a SE cable thing.......
 

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I have some counties side by side some allow SE and others only allow conduit . Kinda crazy when you think about it .
 

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SE cable was damaged when installed, or the male adapter wasn't snug in the hub at the top of the meter, or they forgot to glue the weatherhead, etc. It could be a number of things, but probably some doughhead didn't do a good job on the riser, so water ran through the meter, then into the SE cable at the bottom KO.
 
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