Electrician Talk banner
1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,099 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found this switch and I'm hoping someone could help put a date on it.

I'm assuming it was manufactured by Leviton, and distributed by Sears. Front wired terminal screws.

Markings:
Made in U.S.A.
Sears
10A - 125VT
5A - 250V
UND. Lab
INC. List
Spec Grade

Why would they use the "VT" abbreviation for volt? And then use "V" abbreviation for volt?

What's interesting to me is how modern looking and well made this switch was. All the front wired switches I have encountered usually are knob and tube era.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,204 Posts
We have some circle F and maybe Hubbell 10a switches new in box in the shop. Used one a few months ago for a project where I wanted a DC rated switch. Also have some porcelain toggle and push button switches NIB too. I think there is even still a couple brown/brass rotary switches too. :laughing:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,099 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
We have some circle F and maybe Hubbell 10a switches new in box in the shop. Used one a few months ago for a project where I wanted a DC rated switch. Also have some porcelain toggle and push button switches NIB too. I think there is even still a couple brown/brass rotary switches too. :laughing:
I have been looking to add a Circle F toggle switch to my collection. The one I have now is missing the plaster ears.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,621 Posts
FlyingSparks said:
You mean 10A-125VT. I suppose "T" might be Toggle. Wouldn't all switches by then be supporting loads using tungsten light bulbs?
What that is saying is that it is rated at 10A at 125V but ONLY IF it is used on a tungsten load, i.e. an incandescent lamp. If you use it on anything else, such as an outlet where an appliance might be plugged in, it will only be rated at 5A, up to 250V. In the old fuse box days, you would be required to put a 5A fuse on that circuit if it went to an outlet then, so this was from the days before they just made them all rated for 15A because that was the minimum size breaker you could buy, meaning before the age of circuit breakers being the most common method of distribution. I'd say 1920s, maybe 30s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,099 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
What that is saying is that it is rated at 10A at 125V but ONLY IF it is used on a tungsten load, i.e. an incandescent lamp. If you use it on anything else, such as an outlet where an appliance might be plugged in, it will only be rated at 5A, up to 250V. In the old fuse box days, you would be required to put a 5A fuse on that circuit if it went to an outlet then, so this was from the days before they just made them all rated for 15A because that was the minimum size breaker you could buy, meaning before the age of circuit breakers being the most common method of distribution. I'd say 1920s, maybe 30s.
Ah. Thanks for the explanation.

It is funny, if you Google that "125VT," that seems to be a peculiarity exclusive to Leviton. They are still selling switches with that label.
That's interesting...
 

·
felonious smile.
Joined
·
15,934 Posts
I have a couple like new circle F grounding receptacles. Seemed to be minimum standard builders stuff from back in the early 60s. Do you want a Paulding keyless to go with it?

Sent from my C5215 using electriciantalk.com mobile app
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,099 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I have a couple like new circle F grounding receptacles. Seemed to be minimum standard builders stuff from back in the early 60s. Do you want a Paulding keyless to go with it?

Sent from my C5215 using electriciantalk.com mobile app
I have Circle F grounding receptacles in my small collection. I don't collect light fixtures though. They take up too much space (my house is really small). The only light fixture I have been looking for is a rosette type locking pendant type bulb holder (the ones that prevented light bulb theft).
 

·
felonious smile.
Joined
·
15,934 Posts
I have Circle F grounding receptacles in my small collection. I don't collect light fixtures though. They take up too much space (my house is really small). The only light fixture I have been looking for is a rosette type locking pendant type bulb holder (the ones that prevented light bulb theft).
In my early days we used left handed( counterclockwise) temp sockets and bulbs. A friend of mine meantime worked NYC MTA changing left handed bulbs all day at subway stations. I found a brand new ITT 100 watt long neck bulb the other day. I put that one in my collection.

Sent from my C5215 using electriciantalk.com mobile app
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,099 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
In my early days we used left handed( counterclockwise) temp sockets and bulbs. A friend of mine meantime worked NYC MTA changing left handed bulbs all day at subway stations. I found a brand new ITT 100 watt long neck bulb the other day. I put that one in my collection.

Sent from my C5215 using electriciantalk.com mobile app
I wasn't aware they made counterclockwise bulbs. Interesting.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top