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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In a apartment building I installed a subpanel in the apartment that is being renovated (these are small studio apartments). The main panel is in the basement of the building. The whole apartment is wired from the subpanel except for one outlet which is by the window which is dedicated from the main panel(Exisitng). The room where this outlet is in is the bedroom, I ran two 20A circuits in this room(since it's a studio, it's really a living room and bedroom).

My question is, should I leave that circuit there? I feel like if the tenant wants to turn off the power in the living room they will go to the panel and turn off the breakers thinking that all of the outlets are off in the living room but since that outlet is from a dedicate circuit from the basement it will be on.

Thoughts?

Should I take out the dedicated circuit from the basement? (Anyway it's not AFCI).

Should I just put a label on the outlet faceplate indicating that it is fed from main panel?

Are there code references for circuits being labeled if derived from the main panel as is in this case?
 

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What is the receptacle for? Was it intended to be window ac units feed from the house panel? or is this recep. fed from another apt.
 

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bobward said:
Fully licensed and insured :). So I'm guessing you aren't going to answer the question?
In that case then I'd probably leave it if everything was existing. Or change it. I don't think it matters. A tenant shouldn't be messing with breakers for any reason.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The receptacle originally, I presume was dedicated for an AC. You can tell it was an addtion after the building was complete and makes sense because the apartment in general didn't have many circuits. Each apartment has it's own main panel in the basement. The outlet is fed from it's own apartments main panel.
 

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210.25 Branch Circuits in Buildings with More Than
One Occupancy.
(A) Dwelling Unit Branch Circuits. Branch circuits in
each dwelling unit shall supply only loads within that dwelling
unit or loads associated only with that dwelling unit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
210.25 Branch Circuits in Buildings with More Than
One Occupancy.
(A) Dwelling Unit Branch Circuits. Branch circuits in
each dwelling unit shall supply only loads within that dwelling
unit or loads associated only with that dwelling unit.
Which is the case with that outlet on it's apartment a main panel. The only concern was about the practicality of leaving it being fed from the main panel and not the sub panel. Wanted to get people's opinion on whether or not the would keep the outlet fed from the main panel.
 

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Bkessler said:
In that case then I'd probably leave it if everything was existing. Or change it. I don't think it matters. A tenant shouldn't be messing with breakers for any reason.
What if their dryer is on fire? What if the stove is on fire? Two good reasons for tenants to be messing with breakers. :)
 

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I would clearly identify the panel and ck#, and walk away. If this is a violation, please cite the article (If it is dedicated, I don't see the violation). who knows, maybe they want an AC ?
 

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I say leave it. It's common for there to be outlets in the same room fed from different breakers, so most people would think to confirm that the outlets are in fact disconnected.
 
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