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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
hello

I am trying to accomplish a 1" offset on 2" rigid--using a Greenlee sidewinder.

As you know, the 30 degree method (doubling the offset dimension) will not work, as the hook needs more than 2" conduit for the second bend.

There is, of course, a method using a 'pull through' dimension--the pull through dimension is marked at the far edge of the bender's roller conduit support. This allows for two smaller degree bends for the offset. Instead of using a chart listing small offsets (and using a protractor), you simply work with the 'pull through' figures...

Not having used it for a while, I would ask you for the 'step-by-step' procedure to jog my memory.

Each conduit size has its own pull-through dimension...

thank you!

ps: with all of the You Tube videos online, no one has covered this in a brief tutorial--I'd be willing to PayPal compensate someone for a brief YT demonstration...
 

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It's a good question. I was just using an GL 555 electric bender for 90's, but how do you guys know where the center of a bend is or the back of a 90 ? I was just using the front of the hook. The other guys were bending all the harder bends.
 

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Center of bend on some benders is explained on the unit or in the paperwork. And it's not always a true center of bend, more like "deduct this number from the point you need the bend to be completed" type thing. I've actually gone through almost all of our shoes on all of our benders and marked the center of bends for my most common angles.
 

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Center of bend on some benders is explained on the unit or in the paperwork. And it's not always a true center of bend, more like "deduct this number from the point you need the bend to be completed" type thing. I've actually gone through almost all of our shoes on all of our benders and marked the center of bends for my most common angles.
Yeah, I let another guy that was really fast with it do all the back to back and harder bends, so I didn't get to learn. But I will have to face that beast again soon :laughing: Erickson's are expensive, and the boss lets you have it, if you cut the pipe !

The decals are all worn off
 

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buy a Ugly's book, it has a trig table in it which will give you the multiplier for every bend degree
I have it. We used the basic multipliers for offsets and 90's I just used the hook for all. But with a hand bender you need to use the 45 mark and the Star for different bends. Wondering how you guys do it with the electric.
 

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The star doesn't exist in the mechanical/electric bending world. At least to my knowledge. Back to backs are made the old fashioned way by figuring your second 90 like your first 90 and flipping the pipe around. Piperunner where are you when we need you!!!
 

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The star doesn't exist in the mechanical/electric bending world. At least to my knowledge. Back to backs are made the old fashioned way by figuring your second 90 like your first 90 and flipping the pipe around. Piperunner where are you when we need you!!!

That's how I made a back to back ! Yeah need the Piperunner. Much respect for the guys that are good at running GRC for sure.
 

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dronai said:
I have it. We used the basic multipliers for offsets and 90's I just used the hook for all. But with a hand bender you need to use the 45 mark and the Star for different bends. Wondering how you guys do it with the electric.
The notch is the center on hand benders.
 

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TIP: It doesn't matter where you start your bend ~ so long as you know what the math is. :thumbsup:


I'll use the front of the hook on a 555...I can use the travel of the pipe...etc.

Having options is always better :thumbup:
 

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On the bending shoe tells you the radius of each size pipe. Thats the distance to use between the bends. If you want a half inch offset then put your first mark on the back of the guide start bending until the conduit travels 1/2" spin conduit aline the next mark at the same spot on guide,
bend until the conduit travels 1/2". This only works for small ofsets upto 2" offset on any size conduit.
 

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On the bending shoe tells you the radius of each size pipe. Thats the distance to use between the bends. If you want a half inch offset then put your first mark on the back of the guide start bending until the conduit travels 1/2" spin conduit aline the next mark at the same spot on guide,
bend until the conduit travels 1/2". This only works for small ofsets upto 2" offset on any size conduit.
I'm sure in 9 years they got it figured, but thanks!

Quick question - For your first post what makes one resurrect one from almost a decade ago? It's not a shot at you, I'm just trying to get that process for a few new members.
 

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hello

I am trying to accomplish a 1" offset on 2" rigid--using a Greenlee sidewinder.

As you know, the 30 degree method (doubling the offset dimension) will not work, as the hook needs more than 2" conduit for the second bend.

There is, of course, a method using a 'pull through' dimension--the pull through dimension is marked at the far edge of the bender's roller conduit support. This allows for two smaller degree bends for the offset. Instead of using a chart listing small offsets (and using a protractor), you simply work with the 'pull through' figures...

Not having used it for a while, I would ask you for the 'step-by-step' procedure to jog my memory.

Each conduit size has its own pull-through dimension...

thank you!

ps: with all of the You Tube videos online, no one has covered this in a brief tutorial--I'd be willing to PayPal compensate someone for a brief YT demonstration...
  1. I’ve always referred to it as the “amount of travel method”.
  2. It requires you to put a piece of scrap pipe in bender & slightly snug it up.
  3. Mark the pipe at front of shoe, also mark it at where rear pipe support meets the pipe.
  4. Use a protractor to bend an EXACT 90, and release just enough tension to allow for springback & mark the pipe again at rear pipe support.
  5. Take out of bender and measure the distance btw 1st rear pipe support mark & second rear pipe support mark. This is distance for a 90. Half is distance for a 45, 1/3rd is a 30, etc.
  6. Finally, measure from back of 90 to mark the front of shoe mark. This is the takeup for a 90.
NOTE: these measurements are onlt for this bender.
 

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I'm sure in 9 years they got it figured, but thanks!

Quick question - For your first post what makes one resurrect one from almost a decade ago? It's not a shot at you, I'm just trying to get that process for a few new members.
i was needing a small bend and its been a while since ive used this method and couldnt find it anywhere so when i figured it out i posted it. im sure im not the only one thats looked it up or needed to bend a hal inch offset in the last 9 years. i hope maybe it will help somwone someday.
 
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