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Discussion Starter #1
Hi and thanks for visiting the thread. My name is Eric. I'm 23 years old and looking to be an apprentice. i called like every company in the yellowpages to find out that none would hire me, but a few days i get a call back from one that would be willing to hire me. I have no previous electrical work experience. I currently work at CVS Pharmacy, which is a steady job to pay bills, but i'm a little worried about going into the electrical business b/c almost all the electricians i called said that "things were slow right now." I would hate to take this job and leave a secure job b/c I have to support my wife who doesn't work. He evidently has at least two crews so maybe he is successful and busy? I asked the electrician what were the chances that i would get 40 hours every week, and he said i would as long as it doesn't rain much. I am meeting with him this week to talk with him more.

My brother in law said it would be best to get into commercial electrical, i guess b/c it is probably more of a secure job than the residential?

Do you think i should take this residential contractor job so that i can get my foot in the door and be one step closer to eventually becoming an electrician?

Also, what is the difference between a helper and an apprentice?

Thank you so much and i look foward to hearing from you!!

Eric
 

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Licensed Journeyman
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You better be sure you want to be an electrician if you choose to do this. We are in a very bad market right now. Most electricians have nothing better to do than post comments on forums and argue with rewire. :laughing: Seriously if you have benefits at CVS its in your best interest to stay put for a few years. Take a trade/vocational course before you make this decision. The more vo-tech you can get while earning at CVS will help you. Residential electrical work in your area will not pay much.

An apprentice is very different than a helper. A helper is more like general labor, while an apprentice is learning his craft.

Something I would suggest is check into the Union in your area, if you meet their requirements and they have work they offer a great apprenticeship program. The biggest thing you will need to know is how much work they have. The organizer will tell you they have a bunch and you will always have a job.
 

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I would suggest getting the commercial side of it, but if this is what you want to do go for the residential side of it because open positions are hard to come by. Good luck with whatever you chose.
 

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Chairman of the Bored
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You better be sure you want to be an electrician if you choose to do this. We are in a very bad market right now. Most electricians have nothing better to do than post comments on forums and argue with rewire. :laughing: .
LOL...but it's always worth the trouble.
 

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LOL...but it's always worth the trouble.
He and robroy are about to go to fisticuffs in another thread.:laughing: Something about as$kissin and someones mother.:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Seriously if you have benefits at CVS its in your best interest to stay put for a few years. Residential electrical work in your area will not pay much.
Something I would suggest is check into the Union in your area, if you meet their requirements and they have work they offer a great apprenticeship program. quote]

I hate my job at CVS and I'd be getting paid a dollar more an hour with the electricity job, I don't know if i could wait a few years just to be an apprentice. I was thinking this would be good b/c i could get my foot in the door and maybe transfer into a company that might be into more commercial.

I have called the Union and they aren't taking anyone right now and tuition is about 600 dollars plus money forbooks, which is money I don't have.

Eric
 

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Then go for it. :thumbsup: Expect to have to use a good portion of your first check to buy tools.
 

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Seriously if you have benefits at CVS its in your best interest to stay put for a few years. Residential electrical work in your area will not pay much.
Something I would suggest is check into the Union in your area, if you meet their requirements and they have work they offer a great apprenticeship program. quote]

I hate my job at CVS and I'd be getting paid a dollar more an hour with the electricity job, I don't know if i could wait a few years just to be an apprentice. I was thinking this would be good b/c i could get my foot in the door and maybe transfer into a company that might be into more commercial.

I have called the Union and they aren't taking anyone right now and tuition is about 600 dollars plus money forbooks, which is money I don't have.

Eric
Being a southern state and probably a right to work state, forget the union, their percentage of jobs is prolly pretty low. Look up the IEC and start making some calls. Good luck.
 

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He and robroy are about to go to fisticuffs in another thread.:laughing: Something about as$kissin and someones mother.:eek:
Yeah I saw that.:no:
New guy on the forum talking smack! Same with Rewire too I guess, but damn! They are going to get an email from Pete...
 

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Yeah I saw that.:no:
New guy on the forum talking smack! Same with Rewire too I guess, but damn! They are going to get an email from Pete...
I dont think rewire cares. I hope this newbie OP has done his/her research and I wish him well.
 

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Expatriate in Training
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They have companies sign as members and hire through them....like a union they have set minimum pay scales....like a union.....they have their own schooling.....like a union but they're not a union and the employees don't pay dues. That's the nutshell of what I know about it. I looked at it a few years ago. From what I saw their pay scale is not impressive to say the least but it may be different in other areas. I think it's not much more than a glorified temp service but you can look at it and form your own opinion.
 

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Expatriate in Training
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Btw I always thought the terms helper and apprentice were pretty much interchangeable..........:001_huh:
 

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Starting from Tyler Tx.

Making a jump like that in this market may not be the right prescription for you at this time. You should be optimistic, if you are really interested, but at the same time, realistic. What are your math scores... ALGEBRA...and sometimes, just basic math? If your current job pays the bills then stick with it and find out the rest as you are still earning.
 

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Senor Frijolero
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Here in TX everyone has to have an apprentice license to work in the field. You can apply for one without having a job yet. Without it all you will do is clean up trash or dig. As for the IEC, you'll go to school once a week for four years and work for the member contractor. Your books will be paid for usually as a payroll deduct. By the time you are done you will qualify to take the JM test. It's your best bet to get in the door b/c it shows you are commited to the trade. Around here the only IEC shops are commercial that I know of. I will warn you though it is slow all around and it may take some time to get hired. In the meantime go to this page and see all of the state's requirements: http://www.license.state.tx.us/electricians/elec.htm. While you are at it apply for your license. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
i have taken about 3 years of college courses, and i've always done well in my high school and college math courses. Find out the rest about what? the union and other programs such as the IEC? is that necessary to start working?

btw, i set up an appointment on Friday with the guy that is wanting to hire me, i will then find out more info.

Thanks.
 
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