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I was working on a lighting retro last night and I thought to myself.You move a ladder walk up there steps come down go up move the ladder repeat six hundred or so times.was thinking a pair of stilts would be the cats meow.anyone care to chime In worth it or not?
 

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I was working on a lighting retro last night and I thought to myself.You move a ladder walk up there steps come down go up move the ladder repeat six hundred or so times.was thinking a pair of stilts would be the cats meow.anyone care to chime In worth it or not?
get the type used by plasterers for doing ceiling work
and take your time using them.
I wont use them myself as Im too old and a fall wouldn't be very good for me
 
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I have often though this same thing as well. Not only for lighting jobs, but also with MC and Romex rough ins.

I worked with a guy who put them on when humping 2x4 fluorescents in mass quantities. He would have his helper unpack and lamp all the fixtures while on the ground, and lean them up against te wall. He would come behind on a pair of stilts and put it in 5th gear.

Im a cheapskate, but im all about spending a little bit of money if it makes things move quicker. I haven't pulled the trigger on this though. I also need to learn how to wear them first, they wont do me much good if I take a nose dive the first time I put them on.
 

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ive tried them when i was younger, theyre not for everybody, but if you can handle them or should i say footle them they are worth it!
 

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I had the same thought but it is not "legal" in California...


- April 12, 2013 by Tom Jolliff

As part of ICW Group’s Risk Management Services, our consultants frequently visit customer jobsites to observe employees working in the field. A construction jobsite survey often can bring to light employee activities, or physical hazards, that our customers (the employer) were unaware of.

The use of drywall stilts is a perfect example.

In California, drywall stilts are prohibited by Cal-OSHA (Title 8, Construction Safety Orders, Section. 1637 (j)). Section 1637 discusses general requirements for scaffold, and subpart (j) refers to prohibited types of scaffold.

In states that follow Federal OSHA construction standards (Nevada, Illinois, Florida, North Carolina/South Carolina), drywall stilts are still allowed, but the debate about which is safer – stilts, rolling scaffold, or ladders – continues among safety professionals.

The employees we typically discover using stilts have come to California from another state to find construction work, and are simply unaware of the Golden State’s standard. As an employer, you need to ensure your foreman understand the California construction standard regarding stilts (and all scaffolding), and more importantly, ensure they enforce your jobsite safety policies and procedures.

Looking the other way on stilt use, or any safety hazard, is a moral issue. At the same time, it could impact your organization in many other ways, including resulting in a serious fall accident (impacting your loss experience), loss of productivity, and more than likely, prompting an OSHA visit and possible citation.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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corn-fused
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I had the same thought but it is not "legal" in California...


- April 12, 2013 by Tom Jolliff

As part of ICW Group’s Risk Management Services, our consultants frequently visit customer jobsites to observe employees working in the field. A construction jobsite survey often can bring to light employee activities, or physical hazards, that our customers (the employer) were unaware of.

The use of drywall stilts is a perfect example.

In California, drywall stilts are prohibited by Cal-OSHA (Title 8, Construction Safety Orders, Section. 1637 (j)). Section 1637 discusses general requirements for scaffold, and subpart (j) refers to prohibited types of scaffold.

In states that follow Federal OSHA construction standards (Nevada, Illinois, Florida, North Carolina/South Carolina), drywall stilts are still allowed, but the debate about which is safer – stilts, rolling scaffold, or ladders – continues among safety professionals.

The employees we typically discover using stilts have come to California from another state to find construction work, and are simply unaware of the Golden State’s standard. As an employer, you need to ensure your foreman understand the California construction standard regarding stilts (and all scaffolding), and more importantly, ensure they enforce your jobsite safety policies and procedures.

Looking the other way on stilt use, or any safety hazard, is a moral issue. At the same time, it could impact your organization in many other ways, including resulting in a serious fall accident (impacting your loss experience), loss of productivity, and more than likely, prompting an OSHA visit and possible citation.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
next week ca. is going to issue an order that tapatalk phones acn cause cancer:laughing:
 

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I used to use em all the time for house roping jobs. It is a two man thing though. Helper on flat ground lands cables into boxes and staples , top dog pulls thru joists and over truss on top floor. I stopped trying to work at top speed when I turned around 35 and we started popping out kids. Became more aware of keeping in one piece since my new name was Daddy. I had a contract to wire 86 townhouses. That is where using stilts made a big difference in speed. That and backstabbing devices......:whistling2:
 
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Checked HD, a mid-grade pair runs at about $130. Not bad. I may consider buying some. I guess I could try them out while doing some painting around the house, and get a good feel for them.
 

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Checked HD, a mid-grade pair runs at about $130. Not bad. I may consider buying some. I guess I could try them out while doing some painting around the house, and get a good feel for them.
Good idea, they do take some getting used to. I used to be a drywall taper for a year or two after high school and used stilts a lot.

Once you get the feel of them, its cake.

Never used them for electrical work though
 
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