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I did some 2 weeks ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I landed a job at a utility. We've been going over safety procedures and going over equipment for the past few weeks. I hit the field in three more weeks. 4kv all the way up to 500kv. Just wanted some input on what to expect from someone whose been there and done that
 

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I landed a job at a utility. We've been going over safety procedures and going over equipment for the past few weeks. I hit the field in three more weeks. 4kv all the way up to 500kv. Just wanted some input on what to expect from someone whose been there and done that
What experience do you have to land that job ? Good luck with your new job !
 

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Kinda a broad question to answer, especially without knowing how they're training you. What kinda work are you gonna be doing exactly, just switchyard operations?

If you're gonna be out sticking, remember that checking your stick is just as important as the gloves and you need to give it an inspection and dry-wipe every day. Remember not to lay the stick down or you'll contaminate it, that's a real common mistake especially when guys are in a hurry.

Hold the base of a telescope with your feet while extending it, makes it a lot easier.

You can pull cutouts with a shotgun, but you're more likely to get hung up than with a switch stick so just grab the right one.

When you're operating anything, be it pulling elbows, dropping cutouts, or closing gang switches, it needs a certain amount of authority: There's no spring action to clear the arcs, and a lot of stuff is old and stuck. You do it slowly or get gun-shy about it half-way through and it will produce a heck of a light show.

On the same note: Be careful slamming things around. I've seen a lot of old insulators shatter, especially on old cutouts where ice forms in mounting holes and cracks the glass. Give everything the best visual you can before you run it, and always try to position yourself as much out of harms way as possible. If they give you switching PPE, wear it.

Check all your air gaps on all your phases before and after you run it to be sure each one is in the position it's supposed to be.

On your HV and EHV switching, you're not gonna be doing it by hand, so just make sure everyone is a safe distance sway. On your SF6 bottles, make sure you check your pressure indicators before you run anything.

Always pay attention to what circuit you're supposed to be switching, even if you have to say it out loud to yourself. Check, stop, check again, operate.

Not sure if these are helpful or if I'm just rambling?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What experience do you have to land that job ? Good luck with your new job !
I started off doing residential. Then I took some classes at the community college. Electrical 1 and Electrical 2. I also went ahead and got my osha card and cpr and first aid qualified. I guess that was enough. They bought me on as a trainee. I'll be working with a senior sub tech for my first three years as a trainee.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
John, all of that is very helpful. From what I understand i will be deenergizing, blocking and tagging anything that the relay or maintenance guys need to work on and then putting it back in when they finish. And of course i will have various task other than that, but primarily blocking and tagging
 

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I pretwist and then use wire nuts. Solder pots rule.
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Good luck and enjoy your new job. I'm sure you will enjoy it.
John gave a real good run down.
Now I'll toss my 2 cents in. Back in 90 we lost one of our linemen. He was working on isolating a 4160 line while in a bucket truck. The rest of the crew was further down the line. They all agreed that the line was secured so he cut it..
He was dead before he hit the bottom of the bucket. He had a ground man, a new guy.. He did not know how to lower the bucket from below. It took about an hour before they got him down.
AT the time my wife was working at the facility's hospital in their security office. Our general foreman came in and it took about 30 to find a number to call his wife. Mine sat there only knowing it was an electrician who was killed in our housing section. She also knew I was working there that day also. It wasn't me, all I saw was the lights flicker. I finished what I was doing and when I walked outside, the site was directly across the street from me.. I didn't know what happened until I returned to the shop.

Be safe, look, listen and learn. Not only will it save you, it can save the man your working with.
 

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I work for a utility also in the substation dept also . Every one of our stations have a schematic or what we call a "one line diagram" . With every switching order I get I follow it out step by step to make sure I don't miss any thing and that the order was written correctly by the dispatcher. We are the last line of defense to pick up on a bad order from a dispatcher. Also know what you are switching and way to make sure you understand your order. Verify all your devices operated correctly and always make sure you are at the correct device. We do a lot of switching at indoor subs in which we have to wear a 55 calorie suit , hopefully you don't have to do that , it's gets alittle hairy
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ec, one of the first things i was taught was the importance of understanding a basic one line diagram and walking out the circuit when we arrive at the substation. most of the substations in my area are indoors
 

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Good luck and enjoy your new job. I'm sure you will enjoy it.
John gave a real good run down.
Now I'll toss my 2 cents in. Back in 90 we lost one of our linemen. He was working on isolating a 4160 line while in a bucket truck. The rest of the crew was further down the line. They all agreed that the line was secured so he cut it..
He was dead before he hit the bottom of the bucket. He had a ground man, a new guy.. He did not know how to lower the bucket from below. It took about an hour before they got him down.
AT the time my wife was working at the facility's hospital in their security office. Our general foreman came in and it took about 30 to find a number to call his wife. Mine sat there only knowing it was an electrician who was killed in our housing section. She also knew I was working there that day also. It wasn't me, all I saw was the lights flicker. I finished what I was doing and when I walked outside, the site was directly across the street from me.. I didn't know what happened until I returned to the shop.

Be safe, look, listen and learn. Not only will it save you, it can save the man your working with.
Non Union? ...Never shoulda happened.
 

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I pretwist and then use wire nuts. Solder pots rule.
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bobelectric said:
Non Union? ...Never shoulda happened.
Federal public works.
We are union, it's not mandatory to join but I've paid my dues since day 1. As it so happens our local president is a linewoman.

After this death management was in a training kick and 2 person rule. Years later they've seem to forgotten. Cut backs and slicing of the budget is forcing them to skip training. I hope we get the 2014 up date class this year, but I doubt it.

I'm one of the oldest workers there. My partner has 32 years and his last day is this Friday.
I have 31+ in and about 14 or so to go.
 

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Always review order and one line like I said , but I'm always extra cautious indoors , a lot of our indoor stations are over 100 years old
 

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Kinda a broad question to answer, especially without knowing how they're training you. What kinda work are you gonna be doing exactly, just switchyard operations?

If you're gonna be out sticking, remember that checking your stick is just as important as the gloves and you need to give it an inspection and dry-wipe every day. Remember not to lay the stick down or you'll contaminate it, that's a real common mistake especially when guys are in a hurry.

Hold the base of a telescope with your feet while extending it, makes it a lot easier.

You can pull cutouts with a shotgun, but you're more likely to get hung up than with a switch stick so just grab the right one.

When you're operating anything, be it pulling elbows, dropping cutouts, or closing gang switches, it needs a certain amount of authority: There's no spring action to clear the arcs, and a lot of stuff is old and stuck. You do it slowly or get gun-shy about it half-way through and it will produce a heck of a light show.

On the same note: Be careful slamming things around. I've seen a lot of old insulators shatter, especially on old cutouts where ice forms in mounting holes and cracks the glass. Give everything the best visual you can before you run it, and always try to position yourself as much out of harms way as possible. If they give you switching PPE, wear it.

Check all your air gaps on all your phases before and after you run it to be sure each one is in the position it's supposed to be.

On your HV and EHV switching, you're not gonna be doing it by hand, so just make sure everyone is a safe distance sway. On your SF6 bottles, make sure you check your pressure indicators before you run anything.

Always pay attention to what circuit you're supposed to be switching, even if you have to say it out loud to yourself. Check, stop, check again, operate.

Not sure if these are helpful or if I'm just rambling?
One thing I just want to add, if you are manual closing any device especially a hook disconnect switch triple check that you are not closing into a fault. Even with the bucket some distance back its something you don't want to experience. Also if you have a handle operated gang switch that hasn't been opened in 30 years your better with twisting the jumpers off then trying to move it. I have herd of them failing mid way through an hot load opening. Unless you have SCADA control over the feeder that arc can go for some time.
 

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Test your stick before you test the line....
then test your stick again....
Every time.



Take your time....
the stick gets quite heavy....
but take your time nontheless...
it will get done...
and everyone will return home in the same condition they left home in.

If they give you switching PPE, wear it.
If they do not, wait for it.
PPE will include the hood, cal suit, gloves and booties .
 
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