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If this was my charge... I'd aquire the proper transformers (Utility yards are seldom surveilled or guarded...) and a bucket truck and YEET their fo-pah right off the pole into the abyss... and make this right.

I GOT THIS - chit like this incompetance pisses me off to no end and so.,,
Just say the word and I got his back, for you.... brother.

Just do it. (C. Nike)

We got this.
Let's go ALREADY !!! LAY it on me WE GOT THIS....(y)(y)8
Most all of the work we encounter that the utility is making a big deal about we can do ourselves for a fraction of the time and cost. I tolerate it only due to the fact we are so busy
Ya gotta admit, a Brand New 240/basterd leg Service couldn't be had EVEN IF that's what you wanted...
 

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industrial E,I&C
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Ya gotta admit, a Brand New 240/basterd leg Service couldn't be had EVEN IF that's what you wanted...
Got one last month.
High leg was standard connection charge. 3Y was over 60k. Add a 208 to 120v transformer for controls (just in case someone switches the high leg) and its good enough for a lift station.
 

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Most small light industrial services around here, 600amps and under are all open delta. This is FPL territory
Present bass-ackwards States notwithstanding.
NOBODY wants that type of service. It's outdated, Outmoded and archaic.
Prove me wrong...
 

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Electrical contractor 37 years. Electrical inspector 2 years
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Present bass-ackwards States notwithstanding.
NOBODY wants that type of service. It's outdated, Outmoded and archaic.
Prove me wrong...
A good section of Jericho Tpke in Smithtown, St. James has the open delta. Newer buildings have the Wye. There is a mish mash of 2 transformers and 3 transformers on the poles. Some of the 3 transformer poles are a closed delta.
It was widely used in industrial areas because of the higher voltage ( 240 ).
 

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Bilge Rat
motors and controls.........
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Present bass-ackwards States notwithstanding.
NOBODY wants that type of service. It's outdated, Outmoded and archaic.
Prove me wrong...
20HP irrigation pump that's 2 miles from the PUCO lines.

It's considerably less $$$ to run 2 hots and the neutral and have a 240 open ∆ than run all 3 hots and the neutral and have a 208Y.
 

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A good section of Jericho Tpke in Smithtown, St. James has the open delta. Newer buildings have the Wye. There is a mish mash of 2 transformers and 3 transformers on the poles. Some of the 3 transformer poles are a closed delta.
It was widely used in industrial areas because of the higher voltage ( 240 ).
I disagree, it was wildly used and pushed by LILcO because they saved the cost of carrying that 3rd phase everywhere, so the Katakisinos family could make even more bank... and still charge the highest privately owned electric utility rates in the nation... while blaming it all on "Long Island's unique geography," and we bought it, or at least accepted it grudgingly... and still are.

Because hey... we got the bucks.
 

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Ya gotta admit, a Brand New 240/basterd leg Service couldn't be had EVEN IF that's what you wanted...
The utility must provide any type of service which is tariffed by the State's utility regulatory agency. They must provide, at the tariffed rate, any service which the State says is available. This is one place were the interest of different electrical utilities can be quite different. Many Stock Utilities; i.e. privately owned but publicly traded; want there to be only one type of service in order to hold costs down and profitability up. Electrical Cooperatives, on the other hand, are owned by their member subscribers and will often offer more diverse services in order to support their service area's economy.

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Tom Horne
 

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The utility must provide any type of service which is tariffed by the State's utility regulatory agency. They must provide, at the tariffed rate, any service which the State says is available. This is one place were the interest of different electrical utilities can be quite different. Many Stock Utilities; i.e. privately owned but publicly traded; want there to be only one type of service in order to hold costs down and profitability up. Electrical Cooperatives, on the other hand, are owned by their member subscribers and will often offer more diverse services in order to support their service area's economy.

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Tom Horne
Yep we also have residential or campground "occasional use" meters/service where you're not billed a monthly service charge which includes some arbitraty "included" kWh's in the base charge, so no monthly bill at all if you didn't use power on that property for months on end. The kWh rate in Walton which the cooperative serves most of is even less than my rate, by about 50%... AMazing how cheap power really is when the private profit factor is factored out.
 

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I was wiring up a large machine shop many years ago, that was moving three smaller shops into this one big one. They were under the gun as they had several large government contracts and as soon as the power company turned on the power, before I had a chance to test it, the idiot superintendent (the company maintenance man) began throwing on the main breakers, and the breakers for the lighting panels and the ones for the convenience outlet panels before I could test or knew about it. As I walked in from being with the power company guys, I saw the high bay fixtures, some very bright and some rather dim or flickering. Then this one carpenter screamed that his saw had caught on fire when he pulled the trigger, and an office girl came out saying that their big new Xerox color laser printer had smoke pouring out of it. I ran into the switchgear room and shut down all the breakers and asked who turned them on. My apprentice told me it was the jerk wannabe super and before I could get out of the room, he ran in wanting to know why I had turned off the breakers, he needed lights. Somehow, I managed to hold my temper and I told him that the power company had connected us to the wrong voltage power, and he was going to have to pay for any damaged equipment because I hadn't had time to check it out plus he had no business turning on electrical equipment until it was turned over to them per OSHA rules. I ran out to the power company guys and told them we had a problem and said that we were supposed to have a 480/277v service. They looked shocked and said, "Are you sure? All we ever hook up is Delta, not Wyes. That's when their foreman looked at their work order and said, "Opps, I guess I should have looked at this before we connected the pots. Oh well, we'll get it changed out. It'll take us a couple of hours. Is everything alright in there?" I told them no, that before I could test, someone had turned on the breakers and several pieces of equipment had blown up and a lot of the lights might have to be replaced. He radioed his supervisor/engineer and handed me the microphone and Shane told me to get a list of everything that had been blown up or damaged and send it to him personally and gave me his address. I knew him and said, "Shane, I'll bring it to you and set it on your desk. He just about ****, that 2 1/2 minutes those circuits were on the high legs, did over $44,000 in damage. Every VHO florescent fixture that was on the high leg, needed a new ballast but now most of them were over equipment which made changing them a lot more time consuming and the Xerox machine was $15,000 by itself. It was beyond repair.
 

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I was wiring up a large machine shop many years ago, that was moving three smaller shops into this one big one. They were under the gun as they had several large government contracts and as soon as the power company turned on the power, before I had a chance to test it, the idiot superintendent (the company maintenance man) began throwing on the main breakers, and the breakers for the lighting panels and the ones for the convenience outlet panels before I could test or knew about it. As I walked in from being with the power company guys, I saw the high bay fixtures, some very bright and some rather dim or flickering. Then this one carpenter screamed that his saw had caught on fire when he pulled the trigger, and an office girl came out saying that their big new Xerox color laser printer had smoke pouring out of it. I ran into the switchgear room and shut down all the breakers and asked who turned them on. My apprentice told me it was the jerk wannabe super and before I could get out of the room, he ran in wanting to know why I had turned off the breakers, he needed lights. Somehow, I managed to hold my temper and I told him that the power company had connected us to the wrong voltage power, and he was going to have to pay for any damaged equipment because I hadn't had time to check it out plus he had no business turning on electrical equipment until it was turned over to them per OSHA rules. I ran out to the power company guys and told them we had a problem and said that we were supposed to have a 480/277v service. They looked shocked and said, "Are you sure? All we ever hook up is Delta, not Wyes. That's when their foreman looked at their work order and said, "Opps, I guess I should have looked at this before we connected the pots. Oh well, we'll get it changed out. It'll take us a couple of hours. Is everything alright in there?" I told them no, that before I could test, someone had turned on the breakers and several pieces of equipment had blown up and a lot of the lights might have to be replaced. He radioed his supervisor/engineer and handed me the microphone and Shane told me to get a list of everything that had been blown up or damaged and send it to him personally and gave me his address. I knew him and said, "Shane, I'll bring it to you and set it on your desk. He just about ****, that 2 1/2 minutes those circuits were on the high legs, did over $44,000 in damage. Every VHO florescent fixture that was on the high leg, needed a new ballast but now most of them were over equipment which made changing them a lot more time consuming and the Xerox machine was $15,000 by itself. It was beyond repair.
So this is a good story, but how did the Xerox machine blow up? Was it a 277V machine? That's the only way I could see it being a problem. If it was 120V it would have been on a transformer which doesn't care if it's fed from a delta or wye source

Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
 

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The Xerox machine was a 120/208V. but with the POCO hookup,the power to it was 240-240-388 or some high voltage and the control transformer melted into the plastic of the case and several of the boards went up in smoke.
 
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