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Homer to Jebus
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright, I am looking at getting away from the drag of Residential and commercial, to the interesting HV side of life. Anyone currently in the HV field know how to become an apprentice in the HV field?

Thanks. :thumbsup:
 

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What do you call high voltage? Not to poke fun at you being residential. As far as the Canadian electrical code is concerned high voltage is anything over 750V. Where I work they class it as low voltage 0-5kv, medium voltage 5-27.6Kv, and 27.6-500kv High voltage. What kind of work are you wanting to do, linework?
 

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Homer to Jebus
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Linework, substation, POCO and such. Outside the realm of 480V.
 

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I do some linework. Up in a bucket truck last weekend fixing a burned connection to a pullout. Windy,snowy and looking into the sun.
 

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bobelectric said:
I do some linework. Up in a bucket truck last weekend fixing a burned connection to a pullout. Windy,snowy and looking into the sun.
The company I apprenticed under used to to line work , bucket truck and all that jazz.
Now that I'm on my own , I don't miss it one bit .
You are at the mercy of weather all day and night.
Pay here is better if you get on with utility companies though.
Not saying don't do it, just not for me.
 

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Donuts > Fried Eggs
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Why would you want to apprentice all over again? F that noise.
Not only that, but you will learn the meaning of "grunt" as a liney apprentice. My back hurts just thinking about that.

That_Dude you might want to look into electrical contractors that have large industrial and distribution departments. There's enough privately owned medium-voltage out there for you to get a chance to get your hands into it without switching to a utility.
 

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Don't do it...

Spent 20 years as an electrician an decided to give line work "a try." Now, I didn't go through the program, but was hired by a smaller town as a "lineman." 5kv system so nothing major. Call outs night and day, you cringe every time a storm of any sorts rolls through...and as many have said, it doesn't take a lot of brain work. Stick with what you know, and save yourself a sore back and a lot of sleepless nights.

My opinion only of course. :)
 

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Homer to Jebus
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

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I made the switch , I work for a utility in the substation dept and I do my side work at night . Like the previous poster said it can be tough and yes there are call ins everyday or night but the money is great . My daily duties vary from switch out lines for maintenance . Testing breakers , transformers and other equipment, also installation of new equipment and dealing with the everyday problems that pop up. We also install and maintain battery system in all station and we also do underground cable fault finding . It's a different world but I enjoy it . I typically average about 5-600 hours of overtime a year but there are guys in my dept who take every hour that comes there way and they average about $160 plus with no problem . Another good incentive is if we work through the night we get the next day off paid . And this happens at least once a week . As far as storms they pretty much own you and you never know when they will hit but you could be away from the family for weeks at a time and living out of a suit case in a hotel .
 

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Alright, I am looking at getting away from the drag of Residential and commercial, to the interesting HV side of life. Anyone currently in the HV field know how to become an apprentice in the HV field?

Thanks. :thumbsup:
Try the real thing, utility engineering. Determining which feeders are optimally loaded, protective & selective coordination, SCADA, voltage drop, SAFI/SADI analysis... most that can be done without physical labor behind a desk. Your better off giving the orders then taking them. :thumbsup:
 

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Try the real thing, utility engineering. Determining which feeders are optimally loaded, protective & selective coordination, SCADA, voltage drop, SAFI/SADI analysis... most that can be done without physical labor behind a desk. Your better off giving the orders then taking them. :thumbsup:
Now that's a utility job that's interesting. :thumbsup:
 
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