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Donuts > Fried Eggs
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Fancy. We've gotten a lot of work out of those, because some of them don't have any means of torque control and if the racking mechanism is in bad shape those will just grind and jam everything completely into a dysfunctional mess.

That said, we've also seen a whole lot of guys who don't have any torque control and can grind and jam stuff into a mess perfectly well without any help from a robot. :laughing:
 

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Electrical Simpleton
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Incidentally, there sure are a whole lot of bright-red "Breakers must be racked out!!!!!!" signs on that gear. That, plus the expensive robot makes me wonder if someone had to learn the hard way about proper LOTO procedures?
I sincerely hope that wasn't the reason for the robot.

It is nice, however, to see a company willing to spend money on the robot for an extra layer of safety for the employees!:thumbsup:

Pete
 

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Fancy. We've gotten a lot of work out of those, because some of them don't have any means of torque control and if the racking mechanism is in bad shape those will just grind and jam everything completely into a dysfunctional mess.

That said, we've also seen a whole lot of guys who don't have any torque control and can grind and jam stuff into a mess perfectly well without any help from a robot. :laughing:
That unit has 2 different methods of torque protection with an optional third. Standard is by monitoring current of the motor, will cut out when it reaches the set point. They are set up on site for the specific breakers at that specific facility because the condition of the switchgear varies deoending on age and how well it has been maintained.

As a back up there is a mechanical clutch that will slip if too much torque is applied, the racking mechanism in the cubical binds up for some reason.

As an option you can also have it set for the correct number of rotations.

These devices are safer and less likely to over torque than a person is for sure, in fact they are so accurate they are often used to find problems in poorly maintained switchgear cells.
 

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Donuts > Fried Eggs
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...These devices are safer and less likely to over torque than a person is for sure, in fact they are so accurate they are often used to find problems in poorly maintained switchgear cells.
I'm sure that version is, but there are some low-ball styles on the market.

One of the variety that gave us the most trouble was a version that was literally nothing but a glorified 1/2" Milwaukee drill on a hand-truck. I believe in that one, nothing but basic position limits would stop it.
 

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I'm sure that version is, but there are some low-ball styles on the market.

One of the variety that gave us the most trouble was a version that was literally nothing but a glorified 1/2" Milwaukee drill on a hand-truck. I believe in that one, nothing but basic position limits would stop it.
Yep, there are some bad ones out there, you get what you pay for. :whistling2:
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Zog said:
That unit has 2 different methods of torque protection with an optional third. Standard is by monitoring current of the motor, will cut out when it reaches the set point. They are set up on site for the specific breakers at that specific facility because the condition of the switchgear varies deoending on age and how well it has been maintained.

As a back up there is a mechanical clutch that will slip if too much torque is applied, the racking mechanism in the cubical binds up for some reason.

As an option you can also have it set for the correct number of rotations.

These devices are safer and less likely to over torque than a person is for sure, in fact they are so accurate they are often used to find problems in poorly maintained switchgear cells.
We primarily use the torque adjustable head. I think we only have two cabinet styles that require its use so it's easier to readjust. It's a community machine so we have have to test and set torque each time anyway.

And like you said, it has other options. I haven't had time to play with the current cutout feature yet but it's neat to have just in case.
 

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We primarily use the torque adjustable head. I think we only have two cabinet styles that require its use so it's easier to readjust. It's a community machine so we have have to test and set torque each time anyway.

And like you said, it has other options. I haven't had time to play with the current cutout feature yet but it's neat to have just in case.
They usually do that for you when they do the training. There should be a procedure in your book, it's pretty simple and better than the clutch because it will actually stop the machine.
 
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