Electrician Talk banner

Tap Rules (for branch circuits)

17855 Views 17 Replies 11 Participants Last post by  tfo
I have a potential customer that has a range (or oven) with a wire for a hood fan above it. - They wanted to get a new microwave hood to put in place of the old hood fan.
I suggested they run a new circuit because the old hood fan appeared to be on the kitchen receptacle circuit with all the other counter top appliances. - I am wondering if it is acceptable to tap off of a 40A or 50A range branch circuit for an appliance like this, (Using #12). I have seen this done before but I do not really know the rules for doing so. I looked at 210.19 (A)(1)(3) Exception 1 and it looks to me like this is acceptable. However, I have never done this or seen anyone else do it. I have only encountered it in older homes done by who knows who?
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
467 Posts
I have a potential customer that has a range (or oven) with a wire for a hood fan above it. - They wanted to get a new microwave hood to put in place of the old hood fan.
I suggested they run a new circuit because the old hood fan appeared to be on the kitchen receptacle circuit with all the other counter top appliances. - I am wondering if it is acceptable to tap off of a 40A or 50A range branch circuit for an appliance like this, (Using #12). I have seen this done before but I do not really know the rules for doing so. I looked at 210.19 (A)(1)(3) Exception 1 and it looks to me like this is acceptable. However, I have never done this or seen anyone else do it. I have only encountered it in older homes done by who knows who?
So the overcurrent is 40/50 Amp but your wire is a #12? What is the ampacity of #12? NO NO #12 is for 20 Amp (#14 for 15 Amp, #12 for 20 Amp, #10 for 30 Amp, etc.)
 

· Banned
Joined
·
2,503 Posts
So the overcurrent is 40/50 Amp but your wire is a #12? What is the ampacity of #12? NO NO #12 is for 20 Amp (#14 for 15 Amp, #12 for 20 Amp, #10 for 30 Amp, etc.)
Are you familiar with tap rules?

I learned them in school and I still don't fully understand (our) tap rules.. but you can do some fantastic stuff if you do understand the rules.

Like pull #14 for part of a big heating set, that is on a 30A breaker.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
NEC 2008 210.19 (A)(1)(3) exception 1 states: Conductors tapped from a 50A branch circuit supplying electric ranges.... shall have an ampacity of not less than 20A and shall be sufficient for the load to be served. And, it looks like you also do have to consider the leads coming from the piece of equipment. - Let's say I will hardwire the microwave.... I think I am going to bed, but I definitely appreciate all of your input on this. I do hope to get some more clarification on this.

FastFokker, love the pic!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
8,253 Posts
There isn't any tap rules for branch circuits, only tap rule for branch circuits applies to a clock recept above the stove and was written in the 60's
Sure there is. One example for example allows, with conditions, an oven and cooktop to be split off the same circuit. This is never done anymore because of changes in modern wiring methods but it is still allowable.

The micro off the range...uhhhh, no.

I believe that, if it was 240V, fell under allowable ampacity, and you fed it with #1, you may have a case....but that's not gonna happen.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Are you familiar with tap rules?

I learned them in school and I still don't fully understand (our) tap rules.. but you can do some fantastic stuff if you do understand the rules.

Like pull #14 for part of a big heating set, that is on a 30A breaker.
Dont have my CEC but that rule has ot do with allowing you to go one conductor size smaller for a last in line heater, as long as the heater isn't more than 20-25% of total circuit amperage.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top