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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A few months ago I started a new job as electrical administrator of an HVAC company. It's a nice change from new construction, but sometimes I would like to be a little busier. We have a whole bunch of trainees and specialty journeyman so I thought it would be beneficial to all of us if I got certified to teach continuing education classes. Provides me some extra money and allows the employees a more flexible schedule to take classes.

I've done quite a bit of looking and found out most of what I need to get started teaching. Found Washington state's requirements and forms and all that. I've even started outlining the classes I want to teach.

Just curious if anyone has any advice or pointers for me. Any sites I need to visit or books I need to pick up to make things easier on myself when it comes to assembling a syllabus?
 

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Once upon a time i was certified to teach class, in my instance it was imparting introductory ems to a bunch of HS kids

Being the middle aged dolt, it didn't dawn on me how motivated they became with the opportunity to feel each other up

I say this because every tutor needs to have that certain inspirational tool , regardless of curriculum ....

~CS~
 

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oh, here's some thoughts

I copied this from my post at MH, You can find the same searching there
Under Teaching, teaching class & As Flyboy said there is teacher stuff available and at discount!
....

First, make them write a biography reflecting their job and nature of their work and level of electrical comprehension, name and position with X number of years, have them state true exposure to things electrical maybe a 1-5 scale, address and change your presentation accordingly.

Mix it up every class don't start the class the same way...

Watch your board time ,some with write down everything you write down.
Make and outline or hand outs (preference) for math problems of the study line.

Build a short wall in the class room and use audio visuals; buy some clear plastic Xerox sheet for over head projections.

Buy some mud rings and various boxes put something in their hands, let them see things, and apply to the wall.

Explain:

Fuses, and types

GFCI (up to Code)
AFCI breakers, two and three pole breakers

The difference between DPST verses DPDT. :)

Explain AWG, present and determine math with simple electrical formulas
they can based on you short wall of construction boxes. know to determine AWG thats is present in field and determine insert KW math with simple electrical formulas back to 315.

Explain box fill calc's, to wire size. Bring in all their electrical disconnects,

Explain all things low voltage. Have all their equipment.

Explain scraping the ground lug!

Explain basement need GCFI requirements(period)

Diagram a GFCI, explain the difference to a GFI. Note the difference of when and where around H20 dispensers now required to be GFCI, if they touch it!

Explain circuit protection and an AFCI and show them and safety foul a circuit wire.

Lock out Tag out... a total presentation. Consider OSHA 10 presentation.

U have to prepare twice as much material as to what you might think you will get to present, till you get the pulse of the gang, it could go either way.

Hope this helps!
 

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Fixed it for George Bernard Shaw.

Pete
I'll stand by my quote, thank you.:mad:

Those who can, do; those who can't, teach.Prov. People who are able to do something well can do that thing for a living, while people who are not able to do anything that well make a living by teaching. (Used to disparage teachers. From George Bernard Shaw's Man and Superman.) Bob: I'm so discouraged. My writing teacher told me my novel is hopeless. Jane: Don't listen to her, Bob. Remember: those who can, do; those who can't, teach.
 

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I teach apprentices for our JATC, I'm also certified to teach a few continuing ed classes. Mike Holt stuff is a great resource, but for classes like Code Change or Grounding & Bonding, IAEI has the best stuff. They produce PowerPoint presentations to go along with their reference material.

Honestly it sucks just standing there explaining a slideshow so I like to use real world examples and encourage discussion. A lot of people are misinformed about a lot of things so half of your job as an instructor is to dispel myths. Yoda said, "You must unlearn what you have learned."

If you have any issues with public speaking you will need to get over them. I'm perfectly comfortable in front of a crowd but it takes some effort at first. But I guarantee this: you will learn a topic much better when you have to stand in front of a class and talk about it and then field questions.

This site is also one of the best resources you can have. When you're working up your lesson plan, run an outline by the forum members here. After we finish destroying you emotionally and ridiculing your half-assed curriculum, you will get a much better idea of what will work and what won't.
 

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If you're in Washington I know that Administrators and Journeyman (general or specialty) are pretty much all required to take a 4 hour WAC/RCW update class each license cycle. That's a good one to get yourself certified for.

That class blows though. I teach a similar one for Oregon and the OAR/ORS is a Mongolian clusterfu*k.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I teach apprentices for our JATC, I'm also certified to teach a few continuing ed classes. Mike Holt stuff is a great resource, but for classes like Code Change or Grounding & Bonding, IAEI has the best stuff. They produce PowerPoint presentations to go along with their reference material.

Honestly it sucks just standing there explaining a slideshow so I like to use real world examples and encourage discussion. A lot of people are misinformed about a lot of things so half of your job as an instructor is to dispel myths. Yoda said, "You must unlearn what you have learned."

If you have any issues with public speaking you will need to get over them. I'm perfectly comfortable in front of a crowd but it takes some effort at first. But I guarantee this: you will learn a topic much better when you have to stand in front of a class and talk about it and then field questions.

This site is also one of the best resources you can have. When you're working up your lesson plan, run an outline by the forum members here. After we finish destroying you emotionally and ridiculing your half-assed curriculum, you will get a much better idea of what will work and what won't.
Thanks, the IAEI is a great tip for the code stuff.

I don't have a problem talking in front of a group at all, sometimes I prefer it. :) I figured I would take some time and assemble a few basic electrical classes to teach to our HVAC techs so they can better understand what they're working on and get them some CEU's. Do it all in house at first so I can work out some of the bugs and get used to the whole thing, then expand and start offering CEU classes to electricians and trainees.

Looks like I have a lot of work to do. :thumbup:
 

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I teach apprentices for our JATC, I'm also certified to teach a few continuing ed classes. Mike Holt stuff is a great resource, but for classes like Code Change or Grounding & Bonding, IAEI has the best stuff. They produce PowerPoint presentations to go along with their reference material.

Honestly it sucks just standing there explaining a slideshow so I like to use real world examples and encourage discussion. A lot of people are misinformed about a lot of things so half of your job as an instructor is to dispel myths. Yoda said, "You must unlearn what you have learned."

If you have any issues with public speaking you will need to get over them. I'm perfectly comfortable in front of a crowd but it takes some effort at first. But I guarantee this: you will learn a topic much better when you have to stand in front of a class and talk about it and then field questions.

This site is also one of the best resources you can have. When you're working up your lesson plan, run an outline by the forum members here. After we finish destroying you emotionally and ridiculing your half-assed curriculum, you will get a much better idea of what will work and what won't.
Well said.

2 points.

Like you said you enjoy speaking in front of the crowd,and fielding the questions that make a great instructor , you sure do know your chit with the code and electrical theory ,in a room full of electricians helpers,that is one hell of a challenge.


It looks like you've found something you really enjoy,put both together and you've got a great instructor that your students will remember and talk about how you're the best in the business.

Good work.....:thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

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Thanks, the IAEI is a great tip for the code stuff.

I don't have a problem talking in front of a group at all, sometimes I prefer it. :) I figured I would take some time and assemble a few basic electrical classes to teach to our HVAC techs so they can better understand what they're working on and get them some CEU's. Do it all in house at first so I can work out some of the bugs and get used to the whole thing, then expand and start offering CEU classes to electricians and trainees.

Looks like I have a lot of work to do. :thumbup:
Good man.:)
 
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