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About a year ago I put in a 50a plug on 6-3 wire. It’s in a garage and less than 4 feet from the box. The customer called me this morning and said her Tesla 3 was charging all the way for the most part but has recently only charged to 16%. She called Tesla and they told her 90% of the time it’s something in the house electrical. I don’t know that I buy that. But I’m going over Monday to test the circuit. Other than make sure there’s no corrosion, connections are tight, what can I test?
I plan to plug the car in with the charging cable and amp out each wire. But what else could it be on my end? Thanks! -John
 

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Rezy jman
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Ya just make sure the voltages are correct and document how many amps it's pulling. At least you can confirm there's nothing wrong on your end
 

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About a year ago I put in a 50a plug on 6-3 wire. It’s in a garage and less than 4 feet from the box. The customer called me this morning and said her Tesla 3 was charging all the way for the most part but has recently only charged to 16%. She called Tesla and they told her 90% of the time it’s something in the house electrical. I don’t know that I buy that. But I’m going over Monday to test the circuit. Other than make sure there’s no corrosion, connections are tight, what can I test?
I plan to plug the car in with the charging cable and amp out each wire. But what else could it be on my end? Thanks! -John
as long as you verify everything you mentioned, especially tight connections. Low amp readings may be due to the charger not calling for it.
it sounds like the charger, car, and or batteries are the issue. IF its easy to get to, and you dont have to break any warranty seals, check the battery voltage on the battery itself
ask her if it still has the same miles and range on a charge, this would rule out or point to the charge indicator

It hasnt been that many years since passenger airliners with lithium batteries were catching on fire. Yes, technology is better, but is it really right yet?

bottom line, dont fool with the car or charger for warranty purposes, and dont get between her and tesla, you will end up paying for something not your fault.

Explain to her that your install is electrically good 100%. Tell her she can call an independent inspector to look at it.
You have no control over tesla's issues created by a design fault.
 

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All batteries decay over time. Each type of battery has it's own issue with use. Lead Acids can have the life cut in half on a solar system by just discharging them down to 10%.
Depending on how she is driving and charging the car will have a lot to do with the charge times.

I tend to agree it is something in the car or charger. I also agree that tinkering with the customers parts could be a issue for you. However testing them, verifying the voltage and amperage when charging is not tinkering in my mind. Not that I have a clue how you would do that.
I will be eager to hear what the culprit is when you find it.
 

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Load the circuit down.
hook up three of these and put in a bucket of water. Check current and voltage.
 

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Load the circuit down.
hook up three of these and put in a bucket of water. Check current and voltage.
I am going to assume you mean connect to his install and not tesla's stuff.
I agree, that will prove his wiring, etc. 100%

There will be some people laughing at me for saying this, I carry a pigtail lamp socket with an incandescent bulb (more than a meter) to test/trouble shoot 110V plugs with. If it will burn a light bulb, it will do whatever it is supposed to do.
 

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I'd think a good load would be the Tesla.
Plug in car, measure voltages at the 14-50R. If there is a huge drop, verify at feed (panel or sub, you said it's only 4 feet away)

Then she, or preferable you, can call back Tesla support.
 

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I'd think a good load would be the Tesla.
Plug in car, measure voltages at the 14-50R. If there is a huge drop, verify at feed (panel or sub, you said it's only 4 feet away)

Then she, or preferable you, can call back Tesla support.
I personally would not get involved in a phone conversation with tesla. You could spend hours arguing about your work as an electrician.
I would tell her to tell them to honor the warranty and send a tech to work on the charger (after i load tested my circuit)
 

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Load the circuit down.
hook up three of these and put in a bucket of water. Check current and voltage.
Some of the marina managers wanted to know their meters (in the power centers) were working and reasonably accurate. I took two water heater elements and installed them in a PVC box (8" x 8" IIRC), terminals inside the box. I made sure the connection of the element to the box was watertight. I wired a cord to the box and elements and installed a 50-amp plug on the end so I could plug it into the power center receptacle.

I'd throw the box in the water (elements down in the water of course) and load the receptacle. I'd check the amperage and voltage and do the calculations to see how long the meter should take to register the power consumption and compare it what happens.
 

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Hackenschmidt
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If you are an Electrical Contractor that does a lot of EVSE’s or expects to, you should get an EVSE tester. They are not cheap ($1500) but at least you can actually test it.
That tests the output of the charger, right? If you are going to sell and service the chargers themselves I could see that. But in this case he installed a receptacle and that's what needs to be tested, if it delivers the correct voltage and ampacity the rest is not his concern. Even if you sell and service the chargers, if you have tech support blaming a cord and plug connected charger problem on the recep circuit, you'll have to test the recep. You can test the voltage with a meter but to test under load you need a dummy load.
 
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Light Bender
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That tests the output of the charger, right? If you are going to sell and service the chargers themselves I could see that. But in this case he installed a receptacle and that's what needs to be tested, if it delivers the correct voltage and ampacity the rest is not his concern. Even if you sell and service the chargers, if you have tech support blaming a cord and plug connected charger problem on the recep circuit, you'll have to test the recep. You can test the voltage with a meter but to test under load you need a dummy load.
Yes of course he needs to inspect what he installed, but having an EVSE tester will actually give the customer an answer where just testing the receptacle does not.

First EC comes in, only tests the outlet and tells customer “well, my receptacle works fine, good luck finding the problem with Tesla”.

Second EC comes in, tests the receptacle, and then spends 2 minutes with the EVSE tester plugged in and has an answer for the customer as to if the EVSE is actually working.

Which EC does the customer then use again and recommend to others?
 

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Yes of course he needs to inspect what he installed, but having an EVSE tester will actually give the customer an answer where just testing the receptacle does not.

First EC comes in, only tests the outlet and tells customer “well, my receptacle works fine, good luck finding the problem with Tesla”.

Second EC comes in, tests the receptacle, and then spends 2 minutes with the EVSE tester plugged in and has an answer for the customer as to if the EVSE is actually working.

Which EC does the customer then use again and recommend to others?
If I am the first EC and the customer calls a second EC instead of Tesla, why would I want that customer and why would they bad mouth me when I told them the electrical was not the problem?

If anything, they should respect the fact that I gave them the correct answer in the first place.
 

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I am going to assume you mean connect to his install and not tesla's stuff.
I agree, that will prove his wiring, etc. 100%

There will be some people laughing at me for saying this, I carry a pigtail lamp socket with an incandescent bulb (more than a meter) to test/trouble shoot 110V plugs with. If it will burn a light bulb, it will do whatever it is supposed to do.
I often say the same about the pigtails. Two in series can be used on 240 volts. No phantom or ghost voltages. My grandfather used it, my father used it, and I now still use them. I also have a wiggly and a Fluke. The only problem with the rubber pigtails is it is getting harder to get incandescent lamps.
 

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This is one reason why I do not like all the new electronic devices on the market. When it does not work you do not know if it is the device, the programming, the user, the internet connection, or is it actually an electrical problem. As others above said, most of the time tech service blames it on the wiring. The average homeowner or car owner has no idea of what they are doing and it is easier to call up tech support and then the electrician. My neighbor had a similar problem with his Tesla. The wall port kept going off on some error and he could not charge his car at home. After about a month there was an update to the car and now it works.
Maybe if they stopped playing around with new designs and put out something that works and not rush to market we would not have these problems. Think of the AFCI or when the GFCI first came to market.
 
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