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When working with threaded rod, don't use your Channellocks to drive it into the coupling or anchor.

Take two nuts and, using two wrenches, jam them together at the end of the rod. Use a box-end wrench or socket to drive it in like a really long bolt. When it's tight, just use an open-end wrench to drive the second nut further down the rod, freeing the first nut.

I've gotten funny looks from journeymen when doing this, but I like it because I get to stay in one spot when making racks, and I don't have to mess up any part of the thread with my Channellocks.

If you're using 3/8 rod, ask the tin-knockers for a couple of their large nuts.
This is a good idea. I did something along those lines when I was building racks, lots and lots of racks...
I took a rod coupler and a 5" piece of all thread. Screw the all thread about 1/2 way into the all thread and drill into the side of the coupler right through the all thread. Add a spring pin or cotter pin and you're set. Throw it on a drill and go to town.

I had 3 of these made up for different sizes of all thread.
 

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Old Grumpy Bastard
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This is a good idea. I did something along those lines when I was building racks, lots and lots of racks...
I took a rod coupler and a 5" piece of all thread. Screw the all thread about 1/2 way into the all thread and drill into the side of the coupler right through the all thread. Add a spring pin or cotter pin and you're set. Throw it on a drill and go to town.

I had 3 of these made up for different sizes of all thread.
You know that drivers like that are available with a 1/4" hex quick connect to fit in a drill or impact?

 
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Conservitum Americum
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I use these for backups on screws for the installation of cameras and other devices on ceiling tile or drywall. They hold well and are easily removable. Been using these for years and recently saw other technicians have discovered my secret.

They are the push on backers for duct insulation and you can buy them by the box for pennies compared to threaded or expanding screw inserts. and they don't tear up the tiles.

 

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Hey Grounded-B thanks for the necro bump I was looking for a thread like this but it never showed up in the "search"

Quick note pad: dry erase marker on the windshield. Also suitable for writing down street directions so you don't have to take your eyes off the road.

If you're using tie wire and don't have a dispenser wrap it with duct tape (or black) before you crack it open, pull from the inside and you never have to worry about a mess.
 

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When cutting or drilling aluminum, give your blades or bits a quick shot of WD-40. Stops the aluminum from gumming things up. Lasts for many holes/cuts, re-apply as needed.
 

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For small job TI's -- I'm usually in a super rush... so I'll run two full boats in 3/4" EMT back near the panel -- stranded #12 and solid #12.

This makes each circuit conductor unique.

&&&

The floors are usually cut up for the plumber -- so a scissor lift just doesn't have any range of motion.

So I'll string together scaffolds -- 6' + 6' -- so as to have a poor man's 12-foot run.

The soft lid is only going to run at 9' ( 10' tin studs ) -- so it's easy to run the work above the grid.

For small TI s this gambit beats renting scissor lifts going away.

They just don't need that much height... and plumbers take forever to close up the slab.

&&&

I'm also a big fan of shop prepped Sealtite for underslab runs. The materials expense is much greater than PVC -- but I can unroll Sealtite in no time flat -- with the conductors already installed. (Rotosplit can trim the Sealtite with the conductors already installed.) This gambit keeps me off my knees as much as possible.

( ENT gets shot down by my AHJ. )
 

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On all of my hole saw arbors I wrap a piece of #12 solid at the base where the hole saw screws onto. Makes removing the hole saw from the arbor easier. The copper wire keeps the hole saw from binding up on the arbor.
 

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All the 50' and 100' temp light strings ive seen, use standard size light bulbs. Actually, I have never even seen a left threaded light bulb.

~Matt
we used to buy them years ago but I haven't seen them in a long time

they were always special order and more expensive

and people stole they lamps anyway because they did noy know any better
 

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Your control panels must look like a Skittles factory.


Around here, 120VAC control is red, 24V is blue, Interlocks are yellow - That's it !!


Steve
we buy the bundled wire on large control projects,
each conductor has a printed number on it about every 12-15"
 

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we buy the bundled wire on large control projects,
each conductor has a printed number on it about every 12-15"
With all due respect, the wire # on the bundle normally has nothing to do with the control circuits wire number....at least for the industrial customers I have worked for or designed systems for.
 

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You are correct, we use the factory embossed wire number for pulling the wire in order to prevent labeling the wire on both ends twice.
we have spreadsheet that tells us what each factory wire number corresponds to .
prior to terminating the wires, a printed heat shrink label with the correct control circuit ID per the specs and drawings is placed on the wire.
the factory embossed number is only used for reference while pulling and to install the proper labeling prior to termination (point to point verification are performed also)
this reduces labor & material cost for double labeling
 

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as for the coat hanger method, im a bigger fan of a taking a flagger and cutting the flag end off at a 45, this works great if youre just going through sheet rock or alittle plywood, hole is noticeably smaller than the coat hanger, you can almost do it in anywhere in ceiling and no one would ever notice, once you have to go through a top plate thats when the insulation rod or coat hanger comes out
 

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as for the coat hanger method, im a bigger fan of a taking a flagger and cutting the flag end off at a 45, this works great if youre just going through sheet rock or alittle plywood, hole is noticeably smaller than the coat hanger, you can almost do it in anywhere in ceiling and no one would ever notice, once you have to go through a top plate thats when the insulation rod or coat hanger comes out
Don't know the term. What's a flagger?
 

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Hackenschmidt
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as for the coat hanger method, im a bigger fan of a taking a flagger and cutting the flag end off at a 45, this works great if youre just going through sheet rock or alittle plywood, hole is noticeably smaller than the coat hanger, you can almost do it in anywhere in ceiling and no one would ever notice, once you have to go through a top plate thats when the insulation rod or coat hanger comes out
Don't know the term. What's a flagger?
Marking flags - I use these too, the steel is springy, and the hole is small enough you can pretend it never happened.

 

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as for the coat hanger method, im a bigger fan of a taking a flagger and cutting the flag end off at a 45, this works great if youre just going through sheet rock or alittle plywood, hole is noticeably smaller than the coat hanger, you can almost do it in anywhere in ceiling and no one would ever notice, once you have to go through a top plate thats when the insulation rod or coat hanger comes out
I keep a 1/16" drill bit with a hex shank in my little box of tips and bits. I also keep a piece of stainless steel tie wire in my service tray, I use it all the time as a feeler. I like the stainless tie wire because it's cleaner (doesn't get your hands black) than the normal steel and it is a bit shiny.

That tie wire fits right thru the 1/16" hole perfectly, and is easy to find in a dark basement or attic with a flashlight. The hole is the size of a thumbtack hole.
 

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Fishtabe for large conduit.

Not sure if it's been said in this thread because it's been a couple years since I read most of this.
But I put a whiffle ball on the tip of my standard size fish tape when going through conduit 3" and larger. It helps keep the fishtape from turning back around on itself and jamming in the large conduit.
 

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Another pro-tip: save your short EMT scraps! If there is someone on the job you do not like, place the scraps strategically around their work area.
If you keep a bucket full through a large job take time to mark it remnant/not scrap, so the nice guy that grabs the trash doesn't take them out to help you.
This way you're not cutting 6" off a fresh stick in the morning. Speaking of which you dump out so the boss thinks you were really busy.
 
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