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What do you do when torqueing the receptacles to the required amount strips the threads on the screws? Use a different brand of receptacles? I switched to spec grade receptacles because of the problem.
 

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What do you do when torqueing the receptacles to the required amount strips the threads on the screws? Use a different brand of receptacles? I switched to spec grade receptacles because of the problem.
About 25 years ago I switched to spec grade receptacles because of too many standard grade receptacle failures. I also sent some of the failed receptacles to the certification labs for their inspection and reference.
 

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About 25 years ago I switched to spec grade receptacles because of too many standard grade receptacle failures. I also sent some of the failed receptacles to the certification labs for their inspection and reference.
Same here... plus my hands were about worn out trying to deal with binding screw terminals... clamp type terminals are much better and faster.
 

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Hackenschmidt
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Same here... plus my hands were about worn out trying to deal with binding screw terminals... clamp type terminals are much better and faster.
The price is about triple for commercial grade, but still it's probably less than $100 to upgrade for most houses. You're not just getting the clamp terminals, the overall quality of the receptacle is better. I am not sure that will translate to an hour of time saved or one fewer troubleshoots per house. Still, that's a very small bump in price to do things a little better.
 

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Hackenschmidt
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What do you do when torqueing the receptacles to the required amount strips the threads on the screws? Use a different brand of receptacles? I switched to spec grade receptacles because of the problem.
I am curious, what brand were stripping for you, and were you using a manufacturer specified torque, or the default the NEC specs to use when the manufacturer doesn't provide a torque spec in the instructions?

Maybe manufacturers will phase out their cheap lines, they probably hate selling $0.50 receptacles knowing a 1/2" store bought box offset goes for more than that.
 

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Hackenschmidt
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By the way, if you buy Leviton, the resi grade is the 12650, the commercial is the BR15. They are both made in USA right now. They weren't four years ago, I think they were China for the cheapo and Mexico for the upgrade. We'll see where they are made in another year or two.
 

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The price is about triple for commercial grade, but still it's probably less than $100 to upgrade for most houses. You're not just getting the clamp terminals, the overall quality of the receptacle is better. I am not sure that will translate to an hour of time saved or one fewer troubleshoots per house. Still, that's a very small bump in price to do things a little better.
Have you price checked this recently? The last time I bought TR commercial grade receptacles they were expensive compared to non TR.

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I have heard and read with amused interest as to the application of the correct torque - and the measurement of same - to screw terminals. The terms "in-lbs' and "Nm" get tossed around like people knew what they were or if they gave a rat's a**. I have my own scale that has served me well for 30+ years - grunts. The bigger the screw head the more "grunts" of force to apply. My forearm usually tells me when the screw is set.
 

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Electrical Contractor
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I have heard and read with amused interest as to the application of the correct torque - and the measurement of same - to screw terminals. The terms "in-lbs' and "Nm" get tossed around like people knew what they were or if they gave a rat's a**. I have my own scale that has served me well for 30+ years - grunts. The bigger the screw head the more "grunts" of force to apply. My forearm usually tells me when the screw is set.
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I am now torquing all circuit breakers, panel terminals, switches, and receptacles per 2017 NEC requirements. Torque for Leviton residential devices is 12 -14 inch pounds, commercial devices 20 inch pounds. I believe Hubble is 9-12 inch lbs for residential devices. Of course follow what is printed on the device, or consult the manufacturer.
I use a torque screwdriver with a range of 5 to 60 inch lbs. which cost about $70. I always return the dial to zero after a torquing session. I find it is much faster to use the torque tool verses a screwdriver and going 1/4 turn past "snug" which is not accurate.
Good to hear!!! Not to be a Debbie Downer but:
Be sure to keep your calibration records for it. The lawyer will ask for them after a fire. Most need calibrated at least once a year.

Also, you’ll need at least two sets of screwdrivers so you will still have one to use while the other one has been sent off for calibration.

Or, you can keep a new, unused one nearby and throw away the old one after it’s calibration period expires. It may be cheaper than paying for shipping & calibration costs.

Also, make sure you have enough for each of your employees. Or just have one and share.
 

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Good to hear!!! Not to be a Debbie Downer but:
Be sure to keep your calibration records for it. The lawyer will ask for them after a fire. Most need calibrated at least once a year.

Also, you’ll need at least two sets of screwdrivers so you will still have one to use while the other one has been sent off for calibration.

Or, you can keep a new, unused one nearby and throw away the old one after it’s calibration period expires. It may be cheaper than paying for shipping & calibration costs.

Also, make sure you have enough for each of your employees. Or just have one and share.
If you have a decent sized shop, you may want to look into a torque wrench test gauge to have at the shop for guys to test their wrenches against. If it’s in calibration, and guys actually use it, it would go a long way as to a defense.
 

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This is really brilliant. Now we have torque residential to NASA specs.
 
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Electrical contractor 37 years. Electrical inspector 2 years
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I thought it is not plaid unless it has green in it. ???
 

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Plaid...a Scotsman's favourite colour...red or green. When I look at the picture, I can almost hear "The Lumberjack Song" in the background...
 
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