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Any of you guys carry a torque wrench or torque screwdriver to make sure lugs and terminals are torqued to manufacturer spec? If you do what brand do you carry?
 

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Any of you guys carry a torque wrench or torque screwdriver to make sure lugs and terminals are torqued to manufacturer spec? If you do what brand do you carry?
I have three and prefer the beam style, rather than the click. Not sure of the brands.

Bicycle supply shops make good screwdrivers down in the 0-15 oz range for AL screws etc.

I recently attended a seminar at an IAEI meeting on torque wrenches. The vendor said they had offered a $100 prize to anyone who could properly torque a meter lug by feel. We all tried and failed (myself included), except one out of 100 got it right. They claimed 90% of all electrical problems were connection issues.

I got serious w/ torque wrenches when our POCO started handing out a cheap meter socket and I broke the lugs off, on the last connection.:no:
 

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IBEW L.U. 1852
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I have a torque wrench in the job boxes for each site but we only use them for any high voltage work. They are all from Westward tools.
 

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djmessina said:
Any of you guys carry a torque wrench or torque screwdriver to make sure lugs and terminals are torqued to manufacturer spec? If you do what brand do you carry?
Yes, we are outfitted with Wiha torque limiting screwdrivers and Craftsman torque wrenches.
 

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Donuts > Fried Eggs
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...The vendor said they had offered a $100 prize to anyone who could properly torque a meter lug by feel. We all tried and failed...
Seen a foreman berate someone for over-tightening because the worker didn't have a torque wrench, but when he yelled "Don't you know what 75 foot-pounds feels like!?" :no: I just started laughing.
 

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Semi-Ret Electrician said:
I recently attended a seminar at an IAEI meeting on torque wrenches. The vendor said they had offered a $100 prize to anyone who could properly torque a meter lug by feel. We all tried and failed (myself included), except one out of 100 got it right. They claimed 90% of all electrical problems were connection issues.:
Did most of the connections get over or under tightened? Also is over tightening just as bad as having a loose connection as far as excessive heat being generated at the connection point?
 

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Did most of the connections get over or under tightened? Also is over tightening just as bad as having a loose connection as far as excessive heat being generated at the connection point?
It's funny they were talking about how everybody overtorqued and deformed the wire. So when it was my turn I overcorrected and under torqued. But, I confess I usually overtorque too, by looking at the wire.

Also, they say don't go back and retorque a lug. The wrench should be in motion and stopped at the correct value.

Well I had to ask how does the inspector know if the lug is properly torqued? No one knew:laughing: if he puts a wrench on it it's been torqued twice!

I can only suspect over torque is better than under..they did not say
 

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Donuts > Fried Eggs
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I think I'd rather over-torque than under:

With under torque you immediately have a poor contact area. Depending on the size of the load, this causes a high-resistance connection that quickly cascades.

With over torque you only develop a high resistance connection once the conductor has gone through a couple cycles of cold flow, which depends on temperature, and is less of a problem with copper regardless. It's nothing I'd like to count on for safety, but it seems slightly... uh... less bad.
 

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I pretwist and then use wire nuts. Solder pots rule.
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We don't have any. They will not buy them.
But what the heck, we can afford to redo & redo things.

I bought my own.
 

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I worked with a guy that would tighten a #14 solid under a neutral bus so tight, that the wire would be crushed and sometimes broken in 1/2.
 

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keep it dry, keep it cool, keep in clean and keep it tight is what I was taught. I would rather be a little over torqued but obviously using a torque wrench or screwdriver would be best.
 

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I got a cheap one. The inspector doesn't really want to see it unless its switchgear or main breakers
 

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Electrical Contractor
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I've got a Craftsman. One split lug on a main breaker and you've more than paid for your torque wrench!:thumbup:
 

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I've got a Craftsman. One split lug on a main breaker and you've more than paid for your torque wrench!:thumbup:
This is very true. it would probably happen on a friday at 5:30 pm as well... lol
 
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