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What's going to happen when the weather takes out the service and those
trannies get cold in the deep cold? The article didn't mention anything about better working properties! Just green...
 

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PPE Saves Fingers
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Then it's going to look like vegetable oil you put in the fridge.

Looking at their documents ( http://www.cargill.com/wcm/groups/public/@ccom/documents/document/na3076889.pdf )

POUR POINT
Pour point is defined as the lowest temperature at which a
fluid is observed to flow under specified conditions (ASTM
D97 is a commonly used test method). Conventional
transformer mineral oils have pour points below -40 °C
(-40 °F), lower than pour points of natural ester dielectric
fluids.
The pour point of Envirotemp FR3 fluid is approximately
-21 °C (-6 °F). However, this pour point temperature
should not be considered a limiting factor when choosing
a dielectric fluid for use in cold environments. For natural
esters like Envirotemp FR3 fluid, cold temperature
performance is not strictly related to flow, but is also a
function of its ability to transfer heat from the coils to the
fluid via thermal conduction and then initiate convection.


It's going to get kind of stiff in a cold transformer.
 

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Veg oil oxidizes along with everything it is attempting to protect also.
I can't speak for this use, but I am sure there would be some additives, to minimize the oil negatives and to oxidize you need oxygen, in many transformers they use nitrogen, no O-2 present.
 

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Donuts > Fried Eggs
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Funny you mention this. I just finished putting together a little display to explain to our customers why it is cost-prohibitive or even next to impossible to work on some transformers in Maine's arctic cold.

The vegetable based transformer oils are great: Environmentally friendly, they often reduce organic deterioration which means the kraft paper winding insulation lasts longer, and they are much more flame resistant than mineral oil.

But here's a sample of several dielectrics cooled to 10° F.

Basic mineral oil first. Still pretty liquid. About the consistency of warm syrup.


Then silicone. This was the best performer. Also one of the most expensive. Even cold it wasn't too far from flowing like water:


Then comes FR3 which is a vegetable oil base with a fire-retárdant added, used by Cooper. If it looks about like the consistency of a slushie, that's because it is:


And finally R-Temp, also a vegetable-oil fluid, which is commonly used with CH/Eaton gear. Saying it runs like cold molasses is generous. Think industrial adhesive:
 

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Sometimes in sensitive enviromental areas they require heavy equipment to run friendly oils in the hydraulic systems.
 

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Donuts > Fried Eggs
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Sometimes in sensitive enviromental areas they require heavy equipment to run friendly oils in the hydraulic systems.
Ayuh. At the hydros we used to run Envirosyn turbine oil which cost something like $150 a gallon, and was supposed to be environmentally friendly if it leaked. It was too pricey to use in hydraulics, so they used a water-based fluid that worked fine until they didn't do the appropriate maintenance and it dehydrated and thickened. Then I'd suddenly start getting all kinds of calls about hydraulic pumps tripping out on overload.

"It's not an electrical issue! Problem exists between mechanic's hands and mechanic's brain."
 

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Great stuff John!!:thumbup:
 

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PPE Saves Fingers
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That's a real good demo John!

All we use is VoltEsso and Luminol, and even that stuff gets rather stiff in out of service equipment, like when they replace regulators in the winter.
 
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