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Electrical Contractor
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Just curious, I talked to a guy from Canada over the weekend and he tried telling me they couldn't pull wire if the temp in the building was below -12 Celsius. Anything to it??
 

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wendon said:
Just curious, I talked to a guy from Canada over the weekend and he tried telling me they couldn't pull wire if the temp in the building was below -12 Celsius. Anything to it??
We can't pull romex when it cold. The outside sheath cracks. It's not a set temp, but I had an inspector question why we were pulling and it was below 30.
 

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Estwing magic
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Seriously, nothing says you can't do it, it just gets to the point where it's a stupid thing to do. It depends on the wire type, size, etc. -12 degrees C sounds like a pretty good rule of thumb. Sometimes a matter of just a few degrees can make a big difference.
 

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Estwing magic
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Seriously if you ask the manafacter they will say you can't and in the States NEC 110.3(B) could be used to enforce it.
Southwire’s Romex® SIMpull® Type NMD90 cables may be used for both exposed work in dry locations or concealed work in dry or damp locations The maximum allowable conductor temperature is 90°C. The minimum recommended installation temperature is minus 25°C for two-conductor cables, and minus 10°C for three-conductor cables (with suitable handling procedures). Material should be properly stored above 0°C for 24 hours prior to installation. The maximum voltage rating for all intended applications is 300 volts. Consult the Canadian Electrical Code1 for further information related to applications.
 

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I used to rough-in resi at -10 C.

Now days I only do new resi May to September.

Even at 0 C (ice melting for the metrically challenged) my fingers are good for only 1/2 hour or so.
 

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PPE Saves Fingers
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Actually, the relevant code is 12-100 & 12-102

12-100 Types of conductors (see Appendix B)
Conductors installed in any location shall be suitable for the condition of use as indicated in Table 19 for the particular location involved and with particular respect to
(a) moisture, if any;
(b) corrosive action, if any;
(c) temperature;
(d) degree of enclosure; and
(e) mechanical protection.
Appendix B Rule 12-100
Table 19 indicates the maximum allowable conductor temperature for various types of building wires and cables. Where the surface temperature and/or the temperature on the insulation of conductors, cable assemblies, or raceway systems exceeds 90 °C, such assemblies are a potential fire hazard if installed adjacent to combustible material, and in such cases the assemblies should be relocated or supported in a manner to remove this potential hazard.

The low temperature marking on conductors indicates compliance with a test at that temperature, as specified in the product Standard, but does not guarantee safe installation at that temperature. Care should be taken when installing cables at low temperatures. Measures to consider include preconditioning at higher temperatures prior to installation, and avoidance of mechanical shock from dropping the cable, unreeling the cable too quickly, or bending sharply or quickly at bends. Manufacturers should be consulted when further information is desired.
12-102 Insulated conductors (see Appendix B)
(1) Insulated conductors shall not be installed during any time when the ambient temperature is sufficiently low as to be liable to cause damage to the insulation.
(2)Such conductors shall not be installed so as to permit flexing or movement of the conductors after installation if the ambient temperature is liable to become low enough to damage the insulation during flexing or movement.
Appendix B Rule 12-102
For conductors, with or without a low temperature mark, the minimum recommended handling and installation temperature is –10 °C. Where marked –25 °C or –40 °C, the conductor could be handled and installed at
temperatures lower than –10 °C, however, appropriate care should be taken.
Once a conductor is installed in a fixed position, it may operate safely at much lower ambient temperatures. The lower temperature marking on conductors are based on laboratory tests under controlled conditions and are provided as guidance from the manufacturer. A conductor suitable for installation down to –10 °C, may be handled (when de-energized) at lower temperatures, with appropriate care.

Appropriate care includes
(a) minimize flexing of the conductor;
(b) when flexing the conductor, bend the conductor slowly; and
(c) work with an increased minimum bend radius.

When designing installations intended to operate continuously at a lower ambient temperature, consideration should be given to install a conductor suitable for handling at that temperature.
So we can install it at colder temperatures, if we're careful and pre-warm the wire, but who wants to work in the cold if they can help it?
 

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Electrical Contractor
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We can't pull romex when it cold. The outside sheath cracks. It's not a set temp, but I had an inspector question why we were pulling and it was below 30.
Also the individual conductor jacket cracks.
I have heard of inspectors making some of the loomex kings, rewire a house, if the cables were installed in temps colder than -25C.

Besides who wants to work in those temps?
 

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Also the individual conductor jacket cracks.
I have heard of inspectors making some of the loomex kings, rewire a house, if the cables were installed in temps colder than -25C.

Besides who wants to work in those temps?
Exactly!

And, how much work actually gets done (I have a hard time working with temps below 30F (or -1C).
 

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Mad as Hell Member
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I believe the Southwire website is referencing temperatures not including the windchill. -25C without windchill is a damn cold day. I probably wouldn't be working outside, let alone running Romex.

In eastern Ontario it's usually very humid and windy, as well as cold. -25C could feel like about -40C to -50C, depending on the wind and humidity of the day. Only a handful of days like that around here. I can't speak for the rest of the country however.
 

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I believe the Southwire website is referencing temperatures not including the windchill. -25C without windchill is a damn cold day. I probably wouldn't be working outside, let alone running Romex.
In eastern Ontario it's usually very humid and windy, as well as cold. -25C could feel like about -40C to -50C, depending on the wind and humidity of the day. Only a handful of days like that around here. I can't speak for the rest of the country however.
I, on the other hand, can speak for those poor sods living out west...
This morning it's a balmy -32C, with a current windchill of -43C.... UGH!!!
:icon_cry::icon_cry::icon_cry::icon_cry::icon_cry:
We've been living with these temps for a few weeks now. Pity us...
:censored:
 

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I, on the other hand, can speak for those poor sods living out west...
This morning it's a balmy -32C, with a current windchill of -43C.... UGH!!!
:icon_cry::icon_cry::icon_cry::icon_cry::icon_cry:
We've been living with these temps for a few weeks now. Pity us...
:censored:
Wow, sorry man. I hate it for you. :(

I hope it warms up to zero for you quickly. :blink:
 
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