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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it true that you can't use a regular rigid tubing cutter for cutting EMT ?

I personaly prefer my hacksaw it's faster but sometimes i was using a tubing cutter/reamer depending on what im doing and never had problem with my tool actualy. but here at my new job someone told me that you had to use a specific tubing cutter for electric conduit and not only a regular rigid one.

Is that true? if yes how come ?


Thanks !
 

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A regular tubing cutter will create a sharp edge inside that can strip the insulation off the wires. A special tubing cutter does not cut all the way through and you have to break the pipe at the cut. this is supposed to prevent the burr. Obvioulsy very carefull reaming of the cut can prevent this but few sparkies get it perfect.
That is why I only use a hacksaw and even that needs a reamer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hes a old mecanic guy and said i will scrap the round blade on them too quickly if i use it for cutting EMT. He told me to go buy a new one with a heavy duty blade or something i dunno... EMT is kinda soft no ? i didnt want to argue on this one because i didnt know .
 

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Yea there is a feeling to it. I can just about get it perfect now and not need to ream it, so I keep it in my pouch when I'm on a remodel and don't need to run a bunch of pipe.

I usually get it snug on the pipe, go around couple of times and then tighten it about half a turn. After that, Crack it on your knee or put back in the bender head and it'll snap right off.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using electriciantalk.com mobile app
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It's exactly what i was using a mini rigid tubing cutter and the blade seem like in steel. Maybe the guys think EMT is like a rigid conduit or something i dunno lol.

Thanks for the answer guys !
 

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I pretwist and then use wire nuts. Solder pots rule.
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running dummy said:
Yea there is a feeling to it. I can just about get it perfect now and not need to ream it, so I keep it in my pouch when I'm on a remodel and don't need to run a bunch of pipe. I usually get it snug on the pipe, go around couple of times and then tighten it about half a turn. After that, Crack it on your knee or put back in the bender head and it'll snap right off. Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using electriciantalk.com mobile app
I've done the same thing with a mini tubing cutter. I've had to use it mostly for water fountain retrofits.
Reaming or filing the edge is a must even though I use an older slightly dull heavy duty wheel..
 

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Use a rat tail file to ream, or a plumbers inner outer reamer. you can get conduit to fit perfectly, perect square cut. Also useful like when you need to remove 6" or whatever in a clean room, just score and break. Some guys don't use it right and put a big burr in the conduit, and skin everything they pull into it.
 

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I have a ratcheting King Tony stainless tubing cutter which cuts all that i've tried it on so far. So unbelieveably handy having the ratchet for pre existing conduit that you need to modify the length of insitu. As far as reaming pipe is it considered hack to use the end of your linesmans and twist back and forth? That what I do if i don't have my deburring tool and it works pretty damn well.
 

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The ridgid tubing cutter seems to reduce the inner dimension a bit until you ream it out also, kind of an extra pain when you're using a driver handled reamer.

I try and only use them for pipes with wires.

Also note, old crusty guys will steer you away from things they don't use.
 

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walkerj said:
The only time I would use a tubing cutter is Coe conduit with wire in it. Why wouldn't you use a sawzall or bandsaw or a hacksaw as a last resort?
The old water fountains I've done were recessed into a block or solid concrete walls.
The stub outs were to close to the side wall to get anything else in there. A real PITA.
 
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