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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Along with the topic of tripping breakers, I have used the flashing light method myself. Along that thinking, does your company consider a live panel hot work if you are replacing breakers, installing new conduit, or pulling wires?

We are trying to reach a consensus about this issue.
If it is treated as hot work, then we will have to shut down the panel, install our conduit, turn panel back on, continue with conduit, the shut down panel to pull wires and install new snap in breakers.

We are still feeling our way along with arc flash.
Welcoming any and all comments.
 

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absolutely.

why would the panel need to be turned off when doing these things? It is not a legal requirement.

and the determination is not made by the individual or company. there are higher powers that have already made this call.

and what is the "flashlight method"?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
The flashing light method is for circuit tracing. I was referancing the tread on deliberately tripping breakers.
 

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The flasing light method is for circuit tracing. I was referancing the tread on deliberately tripping breakers.
I knew what thread you were referring to but when you said flashing light method, the only thing that came to mind was "what is he doing with his Maglite?" for some reason the "ing" slipped right passed me.
 

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Along with the topic of tripping breakers, I have used the flashing light method myself. Along that thinking, does your company consider a live panel hot work if you are replacing breakers, installing new conduit, or pulling wires?

We are trying to reach a consensus about this issue.
If it is treated as hot work, then we will have to shut down the panel, install our conduit, turn panel back on, continue with conduit, the shut down panel to pull wires and install new snap in breakers.

We are still feeling our way along with arc flash.
Welcoming any and all comments.

The consensus at the safety meeting we had about this a while back was that if they were bolt in breakers it's live work. It's up to the foreman on the job how he wants to handle it. But as far as our insurance company is concerned, turn the panel off. This actually worked in our favor, by causing some scheduled overtime.
 

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I understand RK position becuase you are actually (intentionally) contacting an energized part. If that is how you define "hot work" then he is correct.

I suppose it is how you want to define "hot work". Actual (intentional) contact or possible contact with an energized part. You have the same arc flash potential in either case so it would also help to know what you are concerned with.

Try consulting NFPA 70E- Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace.


edit: as I re-read your origianl post, I see "arc flash". If it is arc flash you are concerned with, you do realize that a panel is required to be labeld with an "arc flash warning" sticker now, right? I think that kind of sums up the NFPA's position on it.
 
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