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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am helping out at my mother in laws house and they want to mount the TV on the brick above their fireplace. My concern is that the brick above the fireplace, all the way up to the ceiling and as wide as the fireplace, is free standing. There are no studs or tie ins. Would you think it is safe to mount a TV on that and cut out a 2 gang hole for the hook ups?
 

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I am helping out at my mother in laws house and they want to mount the TV on the brick above their fireplace. My concern is that the brick above the fireplace, all the way up to the ceiling and as wide as the fireplace, is free standing. There are no studs or tie ins. Would you think it is safe to mount a TV on that and cut out a 2 gang hole for the hook ups?
Nothing? No wall behind at all? How do you know this? Can something be installed behind the brick?
 

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are you talking about a standard fireplace and chimney ? or some cheesy brick wall with a prefab fireplace or gas insert or something like that ? aren't chimney's 2 courses thick around the flue liner ? If it's an old chimney and the brick is crumbling or smoke is coming through the mortar joints, definitely no. You could always surface mount I suppose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
are you talking about a standard fireplace and chimney ? or some cheesy brick wall with a prefab fireplace or gas insert or something like that ? aren't chimney's 2 courses thick around the flue liner ? If it's an old chimney and the brick is crumbling or smoke is coming through the mortar joints, definitely no. You could always surface mount I suppose.
The brick is a veneer. The gas fireplace uses a regular metal "stove pipe" type chimney. When I got into the attic and crawled to the fireplace I could see down to the insert.

My concern isn't sheer force jrannis. My concern is the side load from the angle of the TV or worse, from an articulated arm.
 

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Call me crazy, but I have never, ever, not even once, considered whether or not a brick wall would hold a tv. Good god man, how would a stud behind it help you? You're making yourself look plain crazy. Don't beleive me? Just ask honestly your much older fathetr in law.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Compression wise, masonry is extremely good for bearing force. We all know that. From my limited education in engineering I understand that brick is very weak to side loads, especially when not tied to a structure to reinforce it against those loads (a stud wall). If the TV is installed on a cantilever style mount I was concerned about exceeding the limits of the walls side load bearing capability. I was also concerned about the problem being extenuated by the fact that I have to cut in a two gang box for connections right next to the mount, therefore weakening the unsupported area of the brick.

If I overthought this oh well, that's why you guys are here for a reality check.
 

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Compression wise, masonry is extremely good for bearing force. We all know that. From my limited education in engineering I understand that brick is very weak to side loads, especially when not tied to a structure to reinforce it against those loads (a stud wall). If the TV is installed on a cantilever style mount I was concerned about exceeding the limits of the walls side load bearing capability. I was also concerned about the problem being extenuated by the fact that I have to cut in a two gang box for connections right next to the mount, therefore weakening the unsupported area of the brick.

If I overthought this oh well, that's why you guys are here for a reality check.
I can see your concern but you have the weight of the brick helping with the cantilever as long as the mortar is in good shape. The larger the mounting plate the better obviously.
 

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I my opinion, you asking for trouble and should be concerned, besides you
trying to crink your mother-in-laws neck?

If the party is sitting and is forced to look up greater than even five not even more than ten degress for extended periods, you will generate a sour neck. Try it make sure to angle your head, not just you eyes, and stare across the room,
even for five minutes... The basket on top of your shoulders like living level!

If in a small space it could be even worse. It's not a ergonomic application at all.

veneer wall
Web definitions
A non-loadbearing stone wall securely anchored to the back-up wall.

You have a fake veneer wall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I my opinion, you asking for trouble and should be concerned, besides you
trying to crink your mother-in-laws neck?

If the party is sitting and is forced to look up greater than even five not even more than ten degress for extended periods, you will generate a sour neck. Try it make sure to angle your head, not just you eyes, and stare across the room,
even for five minutes... The basket on top of your shoulders like living level!

If in a small space it could be even worse. It's not a ergonomic application at all.

veneer wall
Web definitions
A non-loadbearing stone wall securely anchored to the back-up wall.

You have a fake veneer wall.
I voiced that concern before I even considered the brick. Everybody thinks its cool until their in the front row of the theater.
 

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I am helping out at my mother in laws house and they want to mount the TV on the brick above their fireplace. My concern is that the brick above the fireplace, all the way up to the ceiling and as wide as the fireplace, is free standing. There are no studs or tie ins. Would you think it is safe to mount a TV on that and cut out a 2 gang hole for the hook ups?
How do you know this? When you looked down from the attic, were you able to see the back of the brick? If so, are you certain it's only one row of brick, and not doubled? You also stated that it's veneer brick, but veneer is not full thickness, it's half or less, usually way less, (like 1/2") of a full brick and can't be laid up on its own...it has to be attached to a backer wall of some kind, whether it's concrete board on studs, or block (CMU's).

If it's veneer, then you can attach the TV bracket to the studs with screws, or to the backer board with butterfly type anchors. If it's a single row of full brick and you know for certain there's no tie into a stud wall behind it, then I'd be reluctant to hang a large TV, for the reasons you stated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
How do you know this? When you looked down from the attic, were you able to see the back of the brick? If so, are you certain it's only one row of brick, and not doubled? You also stated that it's veneer brick, but veneer is not full thickness, it's half or less, usually way less, (like 1/2") of a full brick and can't be laid up on its own...it has to be attached to a backer wall of some kind, whether it's concrete board on studs, or block (CMU's).

If it's veneer, then you can attach the TV bracket to the studs with screws, or to the backer board with butterfly type anchors. If it's a single row of full brick and you know for certain there's no tie into a stud wall behind it, then I'd be reluctant to hang a large TV, for the reasons you stated.
Single row of full brick. 4 1/2-5' span with no studs or tie ins of any kind.
 

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Single row of full brick. 4 1/2-5' span with no studs or tie ins of any kind.
sounds like a harry homeowner job. when they are in the next room, just kick the wall over and tell em it fell over, and rebuild it right, with a tv.



(don't tell Jerry the bad news)
 
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