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I just started my second year as an apprentice and as such I think its time I start upgrading from my trusty Kobalt tools, to some better quality stuff

Now these may seem like simple questions, but I want to spend my money wisely on the best that I can get

I am looking at the greenlee screwdriver set, mostly because everyone has klein and I want an easy way to distinguish mine.

Also, the klein jouneyman series, how do these compare to the channellock code blue series?

And, I need a good uni-bit what is the brand to go with?

And Finally, can you see any downfall to using a magnetic nutdriver set? Other than I will obviously not use them on circuit boards and such

Thanks in advance
 

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one of the reasons I use Klein linesman pliers (about the only Klein tool I own) is the shape of the head, how narrow the head is, the stake on crimp behind the head (specific to the model I use), and the general feel of the tool. Whatever tool you buy, you must be comfortable with the tool in your hand.

Stay away from linesman pliers that have a large head. They are cumbersome and are tough to negotiate in tight areas.

Screwdrivers; currently Craftsman red handled with rubber grips. They feel good. The rubber does not twist like on some of the cheaper drivers. They seem to have a good life and are easier to warranty than any tool brand I have used.

Nut drivers; mag is nice but the hollow shaft is neccessary in a lot of situations. If you can afford it and have room, both would be good. Be sure to get an 11/32 in nut driver. A ot of flourescent light fixtures use a nut that requires this size of driver and not all manufacturers include this size in their sets. I like a color coded set as well. Easy to find the one I need when I want without looking at anything else.

I use a Klein reamer attachment on one of my Craftsman screwdrivers. I hate using channellocks to ream the conduit. THe Klein reamer works well. I prefer to not use the skirted scewdriver with the built in reamer as I use my screwdriver as a light duty chisel all too often (like knocking out ko's)

I do not use Vari-bits. Too expensive for the benefits for me. Standard drill bits and ko punches when neccessary. (and yes, those punches can be (and should be) sharpened. they are a PITA when they are dull)

Hole saws (if you must buy) Greenlee hole saw They do not penetrate too far in to the metal. They have a shoulder to prevent the entire thing going through the hole. Nice touch in hot panels. They are not as expensive as the carbide toothed saws and they are easier to sharpen. They are very aggressive and the arbor is strong so it does not bend like on the standard hole saws most folks use. Yes, they are more expensive but I feel they are worth it.

Preference of channellock tongue and groove pliers (420's is the size I like) I have 3 pairs in my bag. (why is one tool called a "pair" of pliers. I guess is is like a "pair" of pants). I also have a 480 (20 1/2" BigAzz) carried in my truck.
 

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Klein for dikes 9" lineman's.
Klein or Craftsman screw drivers.
Channel lock channel locks.
Craftsman and Snap On wrenches
Snap On torque wrenches.
Stanley tape
Stanley fiber class folding rule. (good for measuring bus in energized gear)
Xcelite nut drivers 7/16", 3/8", 5/16"
 

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Klein for dikes 9" lineman's.
Klein or Craftsman screw drivers.
Channel lock channel locks.
Craftsman and Snap On wrenches
Snap On torque wrenches.
Stanley tape
Stanley fiber class folding rule. (good for measuring bus in energized gear)
Xcelite nut drivers 7/16", 3/8", 5/16"
Never wanted to afford Snap On
Proto torque wrenches
Nerver knew about fiberglas folding rules, always wood, but for the same reason
Xcelite hollow shaft nutdrivers
Unibits? I always felt that they were tools for a sloppy workman, but they do fill a need :)
Cutting tools? Lennox was the brand, only because my supplier stocked them in depth.

Best Wishes Everyone in 2008
 

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I use mostly klien tools in my pouch for everyday use and s-k, snap-on and craftsman sockets, wrenches and a few odd size screwdrivers and nutdrivers in my tool box. The condiut reamer I feel is a must because no linesman or channel lock can ream a pipe as good. Oh yeah I use craftsman strippers similar to the klien curve ones, because as soon as they get dull I tighten up the screw in the center and take them in for new ones, I tell the cashier I think they broke! I have not bought strippers in 2 years! ;)
 

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Unibits? I always felt that they were tools for a sloppy workman, but they do fill a need
Lesseee. I need a 7/8" hole for a 1/2" connector. I have my drill and unibit right here.....

Or, I could walk all the way out to the truck and get the KO set.

Wait. I'll still have to drill a 3/8" hole just to use the KO set.

But I could drive back to the shop and grab the C-punch instead......




A 7/8" hole is still a 7/8" hole, whether you used a unibit or a punch set.
 

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that is why I have my 1/2 Greenlee hole saw handy at all times. Cutting the hole with that hole-saw I use is faster than using a unibit. It cuts a hole for 1/2 pipe or it cuts a hole for a KO punch equally well.
 
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