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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
is vdv installer technician and telecommunications installer the same thing, for an apprentice path?

also, how similar are inside wireman and vdv installer? I know they have different purposes, but do thy share a lot of similar knowledge and skills?

which one of those teach you more?

Thank you very much for taking the time to read this question!! any input is beyond great appreciation :)!
 

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is vdv installer technician and telecommunications installer the same thing, for an apprentice path?

also, how similar are inside wireman and vdv installer? I know they have different purposes, but do thy share a lot of similar knowledge and skills?

which one of those teach you more?

Thank you very much for taking the time to read this question!! any input is beyond great appreciation :)!
It depends, Do you want to be a tel-com technician,? or do you want to be an electrician?

Also, what is VDV? ( I'M a dummy )...:laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It depends, Do you want to be a tel-com technician,? or do you want to be an electrician?

Also, what is VDV? ( I'M a dummy )...:laughing:
I honestly don't know, I just found that some unions named an apprentice path after that. Thank you for the response!
 

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VDV is Voice Data Video if I am not mistaken.
 
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thanks for the post, uhhh, so stuck, as both seem extremely interesting...I want to work as a software engineer someday, and vdv seems somewhat relavant (networking, LANs, databases), but inside wireman seems so much more fun and more versatile knowledge
 

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thanks for the post, uhhh, so stuck, as both seem extremely interesting...I want to work as a software engineer someday, and vdv seems somewhat relavant (networking, LANs, databases), but inside wireman seems so much more fun and more versatile knowledge
To be a software engineer, I believe you need a 4 year degree from an engineering college.
 

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thanks for the post, uhhh, so stuck, as both seem extremely interesting...I want to work as a software engineer someday, and vdv seems somewhat relavant (networking, LANs, databases), but inside wireman seems so much more fun and more versatile knowledge
Are you sure you want to be a software engineer? The pay is nice but the job is extremely stressful. Also being a software engineer requires a 4 year degree in CS if it has not changed. When I spent a year doing computer work (reverse engineering malware and some programming) I looked into it. Every job posting I found for it required a bachelors in CS or something close to it.

VDV is not really all that relevant to software engineering. VDV, if I understand it correctly, is closer to networking administration.

I would go for the wireman, personally.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You want to do this to be and an electrician "Inside Wiremen - 5-Year Program"
oh, I know, im talking about a career change after a decade and a half, and once I have some money aside.

I am completely aware of the reqs of software engineering lol
 

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To be a software engineer, I believe you need a 4 year degree from an engineering college.
Well really it doesn't have to be from an engineering college since the ABET doesn't really care much about software engineering, and software "engineers" are not actual engineers in my mind as they cannot get their PE, which is what separates the real engineers from everyone else.

You know, assuming by engineer we are talking about those that design and do the calculus required to build things, not train operators. :whistling2:
 

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oh, I know, im talking about a career change after a decade and a half, and once I have some money aside.

I am completely aware of the reqs of software engineering lol
Well the path to be a SE are completely different than the path to do those two programs, so honestly if you want to be a SE you should work towards it, it's not the easiest job to land and perform well at.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
thanks NC EET, your answers have been tremendous in helping me!!

The reason I ask these questions, is because I am not in a rush for school (want to save, and put down money for a home, establish credit score, save for school), and work full time while doing so.

I would like to do so while doing something noble and skilled, as opposed to working in kitchens and warehouse, like I currently am..

thanks again
 

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thanks NC EET, your answers have been tremendous in helping me!!

The reason I ask these questions, is because I am not in a rush for school (want to save, and put down money for a home, establish credit score, save for school), and work full time while doing so.

I would like to do so while doing something noble and skilled, as opposed to working in kitchens and warehouse, like I currently am..

thanks again
I want you to really research what it is like to be a software engineer before you jump into a CS degree 15 years from now.

You would be in a class room full of 18 year old kids and after 4 years you would have to explain to every employer why you want to be a software engineer at your age considering how much mental dexterity is required for it.

If you have a coding obsession and love to code for 10 hours a day, sometimes longer if you have an impossible deadline to meet while you are troublshooting some code that isn't working and you have to figure out why so you can complete the project/update and have it to the customer on time, then I say go for it.

I just warn you to make sure you know what you're getting into haha. This is the reason I ditched my Electrical Engineering major and I am going for an EET instead while getting my electrical license.
 
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I want you to really research what it is like to be a software engineer before you jump into a CS degree 15 years from now.

You would be in a class room full of 18 year old kids and after 4 years you would have to explain to every employer why you want to be a software engineer at your age considering how much mental dexterity is required for it.

If you have a coding obsession and love to code for 10 hours a day, sometimes longer if you have an impossible deadline to meet while you are troublshooting some code that isn't working and you have to figure out why so you can complete the project/update and have it to the customer on time, then I say go for it.

I just warn you to make sure you know what you're getting into haha. This is the reason I ditched my Electrical Engineering major and I am going for an EET instead while getting my electrical license.
:eek::eek::eek::eek:

you have an EET degree? I just though your name was a coincidence? I was strongly strongly considering that degree as well, at NJIT, only program in my state that offers a BSEET degree. The reason I ditched that idea, was because it was my impression that electricians (full fledged) have much more latitude in their careers than their standard EET. I also looked at computer science over EET, because I felt computer science BS progams teach much more for their field than EET.

May I ask please the benefits for you for having an EET degree while being an electrician?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I want you to really research what it is like to be a software engineer before you jump into a CS degree 15 years from now.

You would be in a class room full of 18 year old kids and after 4 years you would have to explain to every employer why you want to be a software engineer at your age considering how much mental dexterity is required for it.

If you have a coding obsession and love to code for 10 hours a day, sometimes longer if you have an impossible deadline to meet while you are troublshooting some code that isn't working and you have to figure out why so you can complete the project/update and have it to the customer on time, then I say go for it.

I just warn you to make sure you know what you're getting into haha. This is the reason I ditched my Electrical Engineering major and I am going for an EET instead while getting my electrical license.
and I research everything lol, and buy a lot of career guide books off amazon for these sorts of questions. thank you sir!!:)
 

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:eek::eek::eek::eek:

you have an EET degree? I just though your name was a coincidence? I was strongly strongly considering that degree as well, at NJIT, only program in my state that offers a BSEET degree. The reason I ditched that idea, was because it was my impression that electricians (full fledged) have much more latitude in their careers than their standard EET. I also looked at computer science over EET, because I felt computer science BS progams teach much more for their field than EET.

May I ask please the benefits for you for having an EET degree while being an electrician?
I don't have an EET degree but I am working towards one. EET degree holders have many opportunities with their degree. If you can program PLCs then you can go one route, if you specialize in instrumentation you can go another route, etc. Many people assume EE's are the boss of EET's and that the EET degree is easier. The reality is that it depends on where you work. In some cases an EE can do the job of an EET, in other cases not so.

EET is a broad degree that teaches you the basics to get into a lot of industries, much like any EE degree. You take slightly less high level math than an EE and you take much more hands on classes than an EE. A CS degree also teaches you the basics to get into many industries. A CS degree can get you into a large number of high paying cushy jobs that require you to sit and play around on the computer for the majority of your day.

The reason I am going for my electrical license while getting my EET and learning to program PLCs is for employment opportunities. Also the fact that my current job has a large portion of electrical work included in it so once I get the hours I need and I know the code well enough I will test for my license. The 17% pass rate is a little intimidating though.

Between the three and the experience I already have I will always have a job. I like electrical work but I will not do residential. I prefer industrial. If I cannot find that, I can work with PLCs or I can do instrumentation work. If none of that is available I can work as an electronics technician. So on and so forth.
 
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