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Beam Me Up Scotty
Elechicken
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2,617 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey Everyone,

I have a job that I am wrapping up where I supplied a lot of network equipment and stuff. Some of the stuff has warranty cards for the client to fill out, but getting the client to fill them out would require knowing where I purchased the equipment, the date I purchased it, etc, etc.

When it comes to these cards, how would you handle them?

If I was to fill them out, all the information would be in my name. Do I get all the required information from the client and fill them out for them?
 

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Hackenschmidt
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10,689 Posts
If I was to fill them out, all the information would be in my name. Do I get all the required information from the client and fill them out for them?
This is probably your best bet. It sounds like you don't want to hand over the receipts and reveal your sources and pricing. Fill out the cards with their info, and you're off the hook - but you could still get a call.

Warranty issues are one of the reasons I prefer to reveal sources and pricing and provide this stuff as a reimbursable, or just let the customer supply. I am not trying to make money as an electronics retailer.
 

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Small Potatoes
Joined
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5,460 Posts
Hey Everyone,

I have a job that I am wrapping up where I supplied a lot of network equipment and stuff. Some of the stuff has warranty cards for the client to fill out, but getting the client to fill them out would require knowing where I purchased the equipment, the date I purchased it, etc, etc.

When it comes to these cards, how would you handle them?

If I was to fill them out, all the information would be in my name. Do I get all the required information from the client and fill them out for them?
You bought the equipment right? If it were me and it were an option, I would ask the customer if they would like me to put the equipment warranty in my name and handle any warranty issues that came in.

The warranty probably only includes the equipment replacement and not the labor. Which would mean I collect the labor from the customer. Keeps the customer loyal if handled properly.

Just another way of looking at it.
 

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Beam Me Up Scotty
Elechicken
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2,617 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
This is probably your best bet. It sounds like you don't want to hand over the receipts and reveal your sources and pricing. Fill out the cards with their info, and you're off the hook - but you could still get a call.
Yeah, I don't really want to hand overt that information.

Warranty issues are one of the reasons I prefer to reveal sources and pricing and provide this stuff as a reimbursable, or just let the customer supply. I am not trying to make money as an electronics retailer.
This job was quite a bit of equipment. Intercoms, wireless access points, network switches, security cameras, NVR, UPS, Cell phone booster, access control, gate controls, etc. It would be impossible on this job to tell the client to provide the equipment. Plus, with this much equipment, there's a nice profit just from the equipment.


You bought the equipment right? If it were me and it were an option, I would ask the customer if they would like me to put the equipment warranty in my name and handle any warranty issues that came in.

The warranty probably only includes the equipment replacement and not the labor. Which would mean I collect the labor from the customer. Keeps the customer loyal if handled properly.

Just another way of looking at it.
I like the sound of this idea. I will be asking the client if they're okay with this. Regardless, someone will have to uninstall and re-install the equipment. The client won't have to deal with anything other than contacting me.


Thank you everyone for your input on this.
 

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Registered
Electrical contractor 37 years. Electrical inspector 2 years
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767 Posts
Depending on the type of sale and the state: Sometimes the manufacturer wants to verify if the equipment was sold and installed by a factory authorized person. You might be 100% qualified but the manufacturer does not know it. Look at the Ductless AC systems or Generators as an example. Many qualified people install them but you still have to go through some factory training before start up. The warranty is voided unless you are factory authorized.

Also, if you mark up the items for extra profit, then you might have to collect the additional sales tax. In some states it is hard to escape the tax man.
 

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Small Potatoes
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5,460 Posts
Also, if you mark up the items for extra profit, then you might have to collect the additional sales tax. In some states it is hard to escape the tax man.
Which states aren't? I'm moving there tomorrow. I hope it's warm there.
 

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Petulant Amateur
Poor electrician, excellent bull chitter.
Joined
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24,533 Posts
You bought the equipment right? If it were me and it were an option, I would ask the customer if they would like me to put the equipment warranty in my name and handle any warranty issues that came in.

The warranty probably only includes the equipment replacement and not the labor. Which would mean I collect the labor from the customer. Keeps the customer loyal if handled properly.

Just another way of looking at it.
Except, if he bought the equipment and installed it, his own warranty covers parts and labor, right?
 

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Small Potatoes
Joined
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5,460 Posts
Except, if he bought the equipment and installed it, his own warranty covers parts and labor, right?
He (the contractor) isn't necessarily warranting the equipment. After all, he didn't build it. The contractor's warranty would normally only cover his installation components to the unit (pipe, wire, support, over current protection, etc).

If the equipment were to fail inside of that contractors one year warranty period and it it wasn't a failure due to his installation, the equipment would be covered by the manufacturer's warranty, but the labor would not. The customer would have to pay the contractor the labor to uninstall, send it back and re-install.

If the manufacturer had a built in labor reimbursement as part of their warranty, such as a fixed dollar amount, then the contractor would have to live with that amount. It's usually grossly under your breakeven point making it a losing proposition for the contractor to handle the warranty.

OR...

This is where the contractor owning the warranty becomes profitable. Double dipping on the warranty labor. Collect from both the manufacturer and the owner of the equipment for the labor.

In this case, part of the conversation with the end user regarding the manufacturer's warranty is reveling the fact that I'm not going to do the labor for the manufacturer's labor limit on the warranty. If they want me to own (if permitted) and manage the warranty, then they either pay me the difference on my labor (up front) and I submit and collect for the manufacturer's labor.

If it isn't permitted by the manufacturer, or they (the owner end user) want the warranty in their name then they have to pay me my price on the labor and collect for themselves any manufacturer offered labor on the warranty.

If the equipment failed because of my installation then I have a possible insurance claim and I need to take care of the customer and make it right.
 

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Petulant Amateur
Poor electrician, excellent bull chitter.
Joined
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24,533 Posts
Only if he offers a warranty on both parts and labor.
What do you do, Hack? I don’t spell it out, I just say it’s warrantied for one year. Callbacks are so rare I never thought much about it.

I would eat the cost of replacing a dud breaker but now I’m beginning to think about it. I have a job installing exterior LED strips on the side of an office building. Customer is responsible for scaffolding. What happens if a string goes out long after the scaffolding is gone?
 

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Banned
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39,205 Posts
What do you do, Hack? I don’t spell it out, I just say it’s warrantied for one year. Callbacks are so rare I never thought much about it.

I would eat the cost of replacing a dud breaker but now I’m beginning to think about it. I have a job installing exterior LED strips on the side of an office building. Customer is responsible for scaffolding. What happens if a string goes out long after the scaffolding is gone?
I don't speak about material warranty.

I offer a 10 year warranty on labor, but I tell the customer that it is lifetime, which I mean. I just don't want to put that in writing because it could make the company hard to sell if they are buying a lifetime worth of liability.

As for material, I do what I feel is right. If I provide and install a GFCI receptacle and it fails within a year, I replace it for free. If I provide and install light bulbs that die, I don't.

It all comes down to feels. I don't feel that I should warranty some Chinese router. Why should i be liable for some other company's products? But something like a GFCI or an LED light in which the driver burnt out prematurely, I would often feel that I should replace it.
 

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Beam Me Up Scotty
Elechicken
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2,617 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Also, if you mark up the items for extra profit, then you might have to collect the additional sales tax. In some states it is hard to escape the tax man.
I already collect and pay sales tax... I'm going to mark the material up to cover the book keeping on it come year end. The whole point of us buying from a supply house is for us to mark it up to retail pricing to make profit off of everything.


Sent from my Samsung using Tapatalk
 

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Electrical Contractor
Owner
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4,303 Posts
What do you do, Hack? I don’t spell it out, I just say it’s warrantied for one year. Callbacks are so rare I never thought much about it.

I would eat the cost of replacing a dud breaker but now I’m beginning to think about it. I have a job installing exterior LED strips on the side of an office building. Customer is responsible for scaffolding. What happens if a string goes out long after the scaffolding is gone?
Manufacturer's warranty for LED usually kicks in when the magic number of LEDs burn out. Depending who, 10 to 25% of the LEDs.
Unfortunately, the manufacturers wont pay for your scaffolding or lifts. For that reason, when the installation calls for expensive access, I throughly encourage the customer to supply the fixtures. The lost markup is worth it, if there is a problem. The customer still gets a 12 month labor warranty
 

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Registered
IBEW 6 volts to lightning bolts
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916 Posts
Every job I've done was specified 1 year from date of acceptance. You purchased the equipment so fill out the cards yourself. Unless it's a tail light warranty then just throw it in with all the close out docs.
 
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