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If the water pipe is metal coming into the structure it is required to be bonded to the service(table 250.66), gas pipe is also required to be bonded to service. If there is csst gas pipe bond according to manufacturer's installation instructions, if the gas pipe is all black iron or galvanized, the equipment grounding conductor for the appliances likely to energize it are considered a sufficient bond.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If the water pipe is metal coming into the structure it is required to be bonded to the service(table 250.66), gas pipe is also required to be bonded to service. If there is csst gas pipe bond according to manufacturer's installation instructions, if the gas pipe is all black iron or galvanized, the equipment grounding conductor for the appliances likely to energize it are considered a sufficient bond.

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the table show how to size, but where does the code ask for it to be grounded?
 

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I'm assuming we are talking about a grounded AC system? If so, code says (in 250.something) that all metal piping in the structure must be bonded to the service. Also any metal pipe longer than ten feet in the local area(I.e.: metal casing for a well), if the building is steel framed, rebar in footing, .....

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The code only asks for it to be bonded if it's likely to be energized. 250.104 B.

Any appliance, furnace, etc that uses gas makes it "likely to become energized". Therefore it must be bonded. However the EGC for these is acceptable as a bonding means.

250.50 & 250.52 don't ask for it to be bonded. 250.52 B1 tells you not to use it as a grounding electrode.
 

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carryyourbooks said:
herein lies my question. i have water coming into my house via pvc on the opposite side of the house from the panel. my house is plumbed in pex. there is a copper spigot sticking out of the house that is connected to pex. should a ground wire be run to the spigot? i have a ground run to the gas line and rebar.
Is your water heater plumbed in copper?
 

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Water line into the house is not metal=no bond, if there is no csst that requires bonding=no bond, you do not have to bond your faucet if your water piping system is non-metalic.

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carryyourbooks said:
herein lies my question. i have water coming into my house via pvc on the opposite side of the house from the panel. my house is plumbed in pex. there is a copper spigot sticking out of the house that is connected to pex. should a ground wire be run to the spigot? i have a ground run to the gas line and rebar.
No. The chances of that spigot becoming energized is very very unlikely. Plus, how would you bond it anyway?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Is your water heater plumbed in copper?
yes. and there is a #6 ran from water heater to water heater. (i have 2 water heaters)

No. The chances of that spigot becoming energized is very very unlikely. Plus, how would you bond it anyway?
i live in a tract home. they bonded it by running a #6 to the clamp which is outside the brick.
 

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Adam12 said:
The code only asks for it to be bonded if it's likely to be energized. 250.104 B. Any appliance, furnace, etc that uses gas makes it "likely to become energized". Therefore it must be bonded. However the EGC for these is acceptable as a bonding means. 250.50 & 250.52 don't ask for it to be bonded. 250.52 B1 tells you not to use it as a grounding electrode.
I Was talking about water piping not the gas piping. And yes, by code the article I posted tells you not to use gas piping as an electrode
 

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Around here inspections have only been done for a few years, some EC's in the 70's+80's never drove ground rods; and the HVAC guys are just running a #6 from the gas meter to service panel ground bus any time they do work on a furnace and run any csst. In effect turning the incoming gas line into an electrode....

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Skooby said:
Around here inspections have only been done for a few years, some EC's in the 70's+80's never drove ground rods; and the HVAC guys are just running a #6 from the gas meter to service panel ground bus any time they do work on a furnace and run any csst. In effect turning the incoming gas line into an electrode.... Sent from my XT1055 using electriciantalk.com mobile app
It's required to bond the gas pipe if csst is used in a house. BOND not GROUND
 

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ElectricJoeNJ said:
It's required to bond the gas pipe if csst is used in a house. BOND not GROUND
Only is it's yellow csst, the new black stuff aka counter strike doesn't required the extra bond.
 

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What I'm getting at is with no ground rod(s) and no metal water pipe, the only thing acting as a grounding electrode is the gas pipe if the HVAC guys bond it to the service panel.

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