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Please take a moment to welcome Square D by Schneider Electric as a site supporter for our community! We are pleased to have them. :smile:

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@Square D_Ishaan @Square D_Sarah @Square D_Jordan

Schneider Electric is the global specialist in energy management and automation. We create connected technologies that will reshape industries,transform cities and enrich lives. Square D exists to enable customers to achieve success in a constantly changing environment with products, solutions and tools to help them save time and money.
 

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Welcome to the forum Square D.

Can you tell us the origination of the name of the company (or brand)?
 

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Welcome to the forum Square D.

Can you tell us the origination of the name of the company (or brand)?

The Square D key dates

Detroit Fuse and Manufacturing, a North American
supplier of electrical distribution and industrial control
equipment, began operations in 1902 with enclosed
fuses and fuse switches. To capitalize on the high
recognition of the trademark on its switches (a capital
D in a square), the company changed its name to
Square D.

1902 - Bryson D. Horton, an electrical engineer,
established the McBride Manufacturing Company, which
he led until 1928.

1917 - McBride Manufacturing, which had become
Detroit Fuse and Manufacturing, changed its name to
Square D. Sales totaled $1 million in 1919.

1926 - The company built its first power distribution
panelboard.

1929 - Square D moved into industrial control following
its merger with Milwaukee-based Industrial Controller
Company and began producing circuit breakers under
a license from Westinghouse.

1935 - The company launched its own range of circuit
breakers and the first circuit breaker for residential use.

1936 - Square D Employees Federal Credit Union was
established The Square D Credit Union is employeeowned
and managed and provides many kinds of
banking accounts and services to Square D employees.

1948 - Square D had 7,000 employees and ten plants
in North America, as well as 43 regional offices.
It produced half of the circuit breakers used in aviation.

1950 - Creation of the first pension plan for employees
in the eastern plants.

1951 - Introduction of the first "plug-in" type circuit
breaker distribution panelboard.

1955 - Beginning of organized growth with 72 sales
offices, new production units, several hundred
distributors and operations in Europe (London, and then
Germany, France and Italy). Introduction of QO circuit
breakers and a range of solid state relays.

1956 - Square D Foundation organized to manage
and distribute charitable contributions previously made
directly by the company.

1957 - New plants opened in Lexington and Atlanta to
manufacture load dispatching centers and safety
switches.

1964 - Square D had 10,000 employees and 22 plants.

1966-1967 - Introduction of I-Line panelboards,
Type S motor starters and Visi Trip circuit breakers.

1972 - Subsidiaries in South Africa and Ireland.
The international network included 400 distributors in
75 countries. The company had three plants outside
the US with 3,000 employees.

1977 - Agencies opened in Singapore, Bangkok and
Manila. Sales exceeded $500 million (double the 1971
figure).

1978 - Introduction of the Symax PLC and Watchdog
energy management system.

1981-1986 - Square D launched a vast acquisitions
program with a focus on electronics.
Acquisitions included General Semiconductors, Ircon,
Engineered Systems, Topaz, Lumacell, Ittis Corp., KB
Denver and Ramsey Controls.
This brought in expertise in data acquisition, robotics,
UPS systems, silicon for semiconductors, vacuum
circuit breakers and variable speed drives.

1984 - People Who Make A Difference (PWMD) Award
established to honor employees who demonstrate
outstanding work in the areas of customer service and
intelligent risk taking.

1987 - Implementation of a business unit structure.

1989 - Alliance Award for Community Service
established. Each year, the company recognizes ten
employees who do volunteer work in their communities
by donating $1,000 in their names to the non-profit
organization of their choice.

1991 - Square D had 18,500 employees, operations in
23 countries and sales of $1.65 billion when the
company joined Schneider Electric in 1991.

source: http://www2.schneider-electric.com/...local/2006/12/se_history_brands_march2005.pdf
 

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I'd like someone to explain the really, really stupid pricing. Why are Square D panels that sell everywhere from $90-130 listed at $367-784???
 

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Estwing magic
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I'd like someone to explain the really, really stupid pricing. Why are Square D panels that sell everywhere from $90-130 listed at $367-784???
It's just a suggested price, the maximum at which the product can be sold.

It's better than the Apple model, where they dictate the selling price. Milwaukee has a similar program where advertised prices are regulated. That's why you will sometimes see an "in store" price or a secret code to get an online price for Milwaukee tools.
 

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It's just a suggested price, the maximum at which the product can be sold.
It's a crazy price that no one would ever pay, and I don't see this happening with other manufacturers.

MSRP prices are generally higher than retail, but with Square D they are often 5 times the actual cost, or more.

WHY?
 

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Estwing magic
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It's a crazy price that no one would ever pay, and I don't see this happening with other manufacturers.

MSRP prices are generally higher than retail, but with Square D they are often 5 times the actual cost, or more.

WHY?
Marketing probably. Square D is Schneider's premium brand and it's an effort to maintain the price differential. I don't have issues with it. I have sold customers on Square D and made extra money on it.
 

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Marketing probably. Square D is Schneider's premium brand and it's an effort to maintain the price differential. I don't have issues with it. I have sold customers on Square D and made extra money on it.
Do you see Mercedes MSRPing their $60,000 cars for $584,000?

I want to know what Square D has to say about this silly pricing thing.

I go thru Cooper Electrical Supply's online catalog and I have accurate prices for every other product but Square D. Every Square D product is inflated by at least 3 times the actual cost, so I have to call in to get the real price. It's just stupid.
 

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Estwing magic
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Do you see Mercedes MSRPing their $60,000 cars for $584,000?

I want to know what Square D has to say about this silly pricing thing.

I go thru Cooper Electrical Supply's online catalog and I have accurate prices for every other product but Square D. Every Square D product is inflated by at least 3 times the actual cost, so I have to call in to get the real price. It's just stupid.
Won't your supplier give you your discount to cost?
 

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Estwing magic
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One thing I will give Schneider credit for is that they always provide extra cover screws. It's a nice touch.

I'm also thinking Square D uses harder steel. I rarely use Homeline and, when I see a Homeline panel on a job, almost always there are stripped cover screws. That doesn't happen with QO.
 

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MSRP is manufacturer's suggested retail price. It is only a "suggestion". It is not a maximum.

There is also what is known as MAP pricing. MAP stands for Minimum Advertised Price. This is when manufacturer's restrict, via contract with their distributors and retailers, that nobody is allowed to advertise the product for lower than a set price. This can be useful to prevent home depot from advertising at 40% below supply house prices for example. Manufacturers are loyal to the supply houses who have been partners with them forever, and they want them to be happy.

None of that however controls actual prices paid. Any seller who owns inventory is free to sell that inventory at any price they want. That's a property right conveyed to everyone every time they buy something; it's your property and you are free to sell it at whatever you can get for it (price gouging during a state of emergency is the only exception I can think of).

So the question is "Why is MSRP $700 on something that retails for $100?" and that's a good question. I'm not saying I have that answer. We MSRP our products at what we believe people are willing to pay for them, which is evidenced by the fact that people buy them and reorder them. Supply houses see our MSRP and ask what price others retail them at and I tell them full MSRP. We make our dollar(s) per unit, the supply house makes a nice margin, and the customer gets a good product at a good price. They wouldn't keep buying them if they didn't.

I know some places will take that $700 MSRP, price it at $100 and try to convince you that you just saved $600. We're all too smart for that to work on us but there are people out there who would fall for it. Another thing it does is leave plenty of margin for markup. I wonder when someone's doing a federal gov't job if they bill it at $700... If you pay $100 for that panel and have a 25% markup on it, you can have a line item "1 Panel List Price $700 Price Ea. $125" and your customer is going to write that check quick.
 
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