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THE "BIG RED MACHINE"
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3,416 Posts
You are worth exactly what the market will bear , along with whatever you can sell yourself as Scott

Just like any of us, on any given day

Good Luck

~CS~

I saw this quote on a high powered purchasing agent's desk once. (large grocery store chain)

"It's not what you're worth ,it's what you negotiate"
 

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Bababoee
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9,187 Posts
Yes I am. I'm teaming up with a mechanical contractor. I'm closing my llc and going in on a new Corp I set up with this guy.
I have been doing well enough on my own over the years but I'm tired of working alone all the time.
 

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Bababoee
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9,187 Posts
Scott unless your bringing something tangible like 800 maintenance contracts or 8 trucks it's tough to put a value on what you did in the past. There is no guarantee that the gcs you have worked for in the past will defiantly use you with the new corp. Electricians are a dime a dozen dude..if you go in there like a pit bull you might loose them. Try to be reasonable and negotiate a performance based bonus and profit sharing.
 

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Premium Member
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7,420 Posts
I would say salary of $70k plus bennies, and a take home vehicle, some thing cheap and fuel efficient like the ford transit connect. Then request 20% of net profits for all electrical work performed by the company. I am a business owner and I have incentivized 2 key employees that way. Nice thing about this structure is when business is good everyone is making great money, and when the bottom drops out I don't get sick to my stomach when I see one of them walking around the office. $70k is also a respectable salary anytime of year, so the employee doesn't feel bad either. At least in New Jersey anyway.
That's not bad

Careful with that. The owners have a lot of control over the net.
Yep

This is the tricky part, there's no reason to open the books to the OP!

The OP is no more than an employee on paper and has no right to the
books either.
I think so too.




Bottom line, Sell yourself !!! Look for the right combination of people to work for.
 

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Banned
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16,981 Posts
I don't think there is any amount of money I would take for someone else to profit off my license. It took me a long time to get and you can be sure that I'm not letting any turd herder use it. :no: But that's just me.
 

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THE "BIG RED MACHINE"
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3,416 Posts
Your both using each other.
I guess there's a few multiple trade corporations out here in Cali. I think there were more in the nineties.

I've got to get into solar that's booming,I assume there's enough profit in it.
 

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Bababoee
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9,187 Posts
I guess there's a few multiple trade corporations out here in Cali. I think there were more in the nineties.

I've got to get into solar that's booming,I assume there's enough profit in it.
You have to find some kind of niche if you really want to stand out. Electricians and licensees are pretty much a dime a dozen. A license is pretty worthless of you don't do anything with it. Some guys are risk takers and others not so much. I want to be part of something bigger.
 

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Bababoee
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9,187 Posts
Yea I get it ...there is a certain comfort in working solo .I did well on my own and enjoyed it for the most part but eventually you top out. I want more and I would love to eventually take the tools off..
 

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RIP 1959-2015
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10,750 Posts
If I understand Massachusetts correctly a Masters is required to have an electrical contracting business. Without the Masters they can't do the work and unlike Illinois, the penalties are severe. I would personally check the liability. Again, if I understand correctly, if their employee does electrical work without a permit, you lose your Masters.
In Mass, a Journeyman electrician can run his own business with one apprentice, however he cannot hire another journeyman without first having the required master electrician license.

The master electrician license gives you the right to hire as many journeymen that you wish.

As a Master you can hire one apprentice, the next guy must be at least a journeyman electrician before you can hire another apprentice.

So the ratio is one to one, if you need to fire a journeyman then you will have to fire an apprentice as well the keep the ratio.
 

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Petulant Amateur
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24,236 Posts
Here's the scenario:

Established plumbing/hvac shop, 15 guys, looking to offer electrical services. They need a Master Electrician. Already have a journeyman and apprentice on staff. Masters role will be sales, estimating, design, permits etc and some field work. Of course providing the license to be used by the company is the biggest piece of the puzzle. This is for resi service mostly.
I bring the license and 27 years in the trade, 20+ as a one man operation doing exactly what they are looking for someone to do.

I need to come up with a value for this and I'm coming up empty!!!

Thoughts????
If they need you worse than you need them it should be six figures. I wouldn't be scared of talking profit sharing or commission to get to that figure but it needs to be an iron clad agreement. Throw in the company truck and you're good to go.
 

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12,167 Posts
Well at my age and where I live, I would take that position for $30/hour plus benefits plus 5% of the GROSS sales of the electrical department (and the understanding that I do not pick up my tools). 10 years ago I'd laugh if someone made me that offer. I know you live in a higher cost area than I do so $30/hour would not be enough for you.

So now that a lot of people have voiced their opinion, what do you think it's worth?

And like someone else mentioned, I thought you were already doing something like this. Is this a new gig or ....?
 

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Super Moderator
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21,902 Posts
I would say that I need to make at least what I am making now for me to give up what I am doing. If they decide to let you go then you are now a defunct company and have to start up again.

There are many factors-- are you tired of doing the physical work? Do you make enough money on your own? Can you tolerate a boss? etc
 
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The money would have to be there to outweigh the risk. Why dont you offer to work for them for a while pulling permits as yourself, get a feel for how their electricians work quality is, then decide about the licensing?
 
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