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It’s actually really simple, I’m being told. Figure out a curve of target moisture content and temperature, then run the fans and heat to meet the curve. I’m guessing those timers could do that just fine, just not so easy to program a batch…

They use a software package from Lignomat (as do all of my lumber customers) to batch and monitor the kiln. My drive cabinet just had to bring in the start/stop/speed signals and turn them into reality, and give them manual override options.
If you are refering to the LED readouts as timers, they are UDC s they change the thermocouple reading into a temp and monitor that against a programed over temp. There are 8 TCs: 3 that the controller reads directly to regulate the furnace; 4 that are spaced down the side of the kiln for over temp shutdown; 1 that is on the outlet of the furnace for OT shut down. There are timers for direction and duration of the circulating fans inside the kiln, these are located in the MCC. 3 hours one way, 3 the other until a time determined by experience (usually 2.5 days) is used to manually end the drying time
 

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Done a bunch of that. Normally fairly simple material wise, can get dicey to actually get it reconnected.

My usual way is to remove the existing meter base and put the new outdoor panel in its position, with a ko in the back to allow entry of the existing inside panel feeder. Replace them with full length to a breaker in the new main panel and add the ground bar and feeder wire in the now xisting sub panel. Mount the new meter base in an appropriate position. Upgrade the ground rod and GEC. Done. Usually less than half a day for me and the JM i work with quite often
 

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Ah, first service change.
Brings back memories.
What tools did you forget?
What tools do you need but didn't know until...oops!
What materials are you working with?
What is lead time to get POCO back to reconnect? Or are you doing this hot?
Be safe brother.
 

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Because with some power companies that is what you have to do on an overhead service.

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They dont do that around here. I have cut the service loose above the weather head just to get the old meter out of the way. Also if going from 60 to 200, i would have to replace mast, meter base and all. so in other words it had to be cut sooner or later.
 

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They dont do that around here. I have cut the service loose above the weather head just to get the old meter out of the way. Also if going from 60 to 200, i would have to replace mast, meter base and all. so in other words it had to be cut sooner or later.
I should clarify, I did mean cut it free and then reconnect after you are done.

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I should clarify, I did mean cut it free and then reconnect after you are done.

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LOL. you did have me confused. Here normally the poco cuts loose and reconnects. I usually try to schedule them for my expected reconnect time and just push the old meter/mast out of the way so i can work. sometimes i cut it loose myself if i cant push it out of the way
 

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I have to go back to lace the panel... getting the mast installed by myself took longer than I had wanted it to. I had to take the planks off the wall to install blocks for the mast bolts, and while I had the wall open I pit some insulation in the wall (styrofoam) and spray foamed it. I will have to drop a few new circuits in as well, because I know they're going to be tripping breakers now... I also need wire to splice the stove, and being 2 hours from home, it's a job for another day. It's a seasonal cottage that's already closed for winter, so I have all winter to finish it before they start using it in May.

I know a guywire was going to be needed, but when the hydro guys told me they didn't have any 1/0 triplex as required, and all they had was 3/0, I was glad I was going overkill with my guywire. I used 1/4" wire rope with compression sleeves/swages, complete with a forged eyelet rated for 2.25 tons... I know the structure will be pulled apart or off the blocks it's on Before my giywire let's go LOL. It was my first service doing a guywire, but its not hard to do... there was some uncertainty whether I needed an additional insulator for it or not... but the inspector cleared that up.

This was my first fully solo service with a mast (I've done some others that were all PVC by myself, but that's a little different, at least IMHO), and there was no one there to help me if I needed it.

The flashing for the mast is sticking out and the old mast had no siding behind it, so I think when I go back I'm going to bring some wood and some flashing so I can fix it properly. For now it got sprayfoam to keep the water out (there's already some major water damage at the rood line, I don't want it getting worse.) The old mast didn't have flashing it was just siliconed.
 

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View attachment 159252
View attachment 159250
View attachment 159251

I have to go back to lace the panel... getting the mast installed by myself took longer than I had wanted it to. I had to take the planks off the wall to install blocks for the mast bolts, and while I had the wall open I pit some insulation in the wall (styrofoam) and spray foamed it. I will have to drop a few new circuits in as well, because I know they're going to be tripping breakers now... I also need wire to splice the stove, and being 2 hours from home, it's a job for another day. It's a seasonal cottage that's already closed for winter, so I have all winter to finish it before they start using it in May.

I know a guywire was going to be needed, but when the hydro guys told me they didn't have any 1/0 triplex as required, and all they had was 3/0, I was glad I was going overkill with my guywire. I used 1/4" wire rope with compression sleeves/swages, complete with a forged eyelet rated for 2.25 tons... I know the structure will be pulled apart or off the blocks it's on Before my giywire let's go LOL. It was my first service doing a guywire, but its not hard to do... there was some uncertainty whether I needed an additional insulator for it or not... but the inspector cleared that up.

This was my first fully solo service with a mast (I've done some others that were all PVC by myself, but that's a little different, at least IMHO), and there was no one there to help me if I needed it.

The flashing for the mast is sticking out and the old mast had no siding behind it, so I think when I go back I'm going to bring some wood and some flashing so I can fix it properly. For now it got sprayfoam to keep the water out (there's already some major water damage at the rood line, I don't want it getting worse.) The old mast didn't have flashing it was just siliconed.
What is preventing your guy wire at the mast from sliding down? Didn't have an LR out of the meter?
View attachment 159249 View attachment 159253
View attachment 159252
View attachment 159250
View attachment 159251

I have to go back to lace the panel... getting the mast installed by myself took longer than I had wanted it to. I had to take the planks off the wall to install blocks for the mast bolts, and while I had the wall open I pit some insulation in the wall (styrofoam) and spray foamed it. I will have to drop a few new circuits in as well, because I know they're going to be tripping breakers now... I also need wire to splice the stove, and being 2 hours from home, it's a job for another day. It's a seasonal cottage that's already closed for winter, so I have all winter to finish it before they start using it in May.

I know a guywire was going to be needed, but when the hydro guys told me they didn't have any 1/0 triplex as required, and all they had was 3/0, I was glad I was going overkill with my guywire. I used 1/4" wire rope with compression sleeves/swages, complete with a forged eyelet rated for 2.25 tons... I know the structure will be pulled apart or off the blocks it's on Before my giywire let's go LOL. It was my first service doing a guywire, but its not hard to do... there was some uncertainty whether I needed an additional insulator for it or not... but the inspector cleared that up.

This was my first fully solo service with a mast (I've done some others that were all PVC by myself, but that's a little different, at least IMHO), and there was no one there to help me if I needed it.

The flashing for the mast is sticking out and the old mast had no siding behind it, so I think when I go back I'm going to bring some wood and some flashing so I can fix it properly. For now it got sprayfoam to keep the water out (there's already some major water damage at the rood line, I don't want it getting worse.) The old mast didn't have flashing it was just siliconed.
 
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