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The way they're talking in the video, that was not a mannequin.
A brutal reminder why we need proper training, ppe, sop, etc...
I feel for his family and friends. I hope they open the casket and force whoever ordered him up there to take a good long look.
 

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I wonder if they get 1/2 off on cremation since the job’s 1/2 way done..


Or is it like when you get a job the customer has started and you have to charge twice as much to fix their mess.


Asking for a friend.
 

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Those aren't phone wires at his feet, they are secondary. And the arcing is the current going through his body from the primary to the triplex.
 

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Hate to say it but they have a better power supply that my area. Here he would have got 3 quick shocks followed by a 3 hr wait until the pixies showed up.
Neighbors tree has taken the power out to our estate at least 10 times this year and its still healthy as hell. I asked them if they could give it a attitude adjustment with a chainsaw and they claim that it not on the right of way so they can not cut it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Question. If electricity is considered to be the flow of electrons passing through the body, (much the same way these electrons pass over or through a wire in your house), are electrons matter? By that I mean "stuff" that all things are made from?

As I came to understand it in science class, all things are made up of atoms. Parts of the atom are electrons, neutrons, and protons. So are electrons actual matter in the sense of the word? When you get shocked, it sure as hell feels like "stuff" is flowing through your body. Or am I wrong? I mean you can't put a pile of electricity on the table, and have matter. But if you have enough atoms of whatever, you have "stuff". So what's the difference?
 

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[QUOTE="billt460, post: 5466829, member:

...I mean you can't put a pile of electricity on the table, and have matter. But if you have enough atoms of whatever, you have "stuff". So what's the difference?
[/QUOTE]

Let's see if i remember correctly:
In alternating current, the electrons bump into each other, like sound waves bumping into air particles. Electrons do have mass- something like 1x10^-23 kg or something. Just about everything i can think of has mass. That's why they can bump into each other. The individual electron actually moves slower than we'd think, but because they're so close together(relative to our size as humans), the "ripple" effect is noticed immediately. Remember that if we were the size of electrons we'd see holes all over the place- in wood, in steel, in congress' explanation of why they're exempt from laws that we must abide by...
The electrons are not in the electricity, they're in the conductor- Cu, Al, Your body... You're correct that you can't put a pile of electricity on the table, but you can put a pile of the conductor on the table.
Grab a used college light and waves physics textbook and work through it sometime, you know, in your spare time.
I probably just muddied the waters, but my goal was to somehow work in something about the electrons lining up for their flu shots. I failed.
 

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Question. If electricity is considered to be the flow of electrons passing through the body, (much the same way these electrons pass over or through a wire in your house), are electrons matter? By that I mean "stuff" that all things are made from?

As I came to understand it in science class, all things are made up of atoms. Parts of the atom are electrons, neutrons, and protons. So are electrons actual matter in the sense of the word? When you get shocked, it sure as hell feels like "stuff" is flowing through your body. Or am I wrong? I mean you can't put a pile of electricity on the table, and have matter. But if you have enough atoms of whatever, you have "stuff". So what's the difference?
Electrons do have mass, according to google 9.10938356 × 10-31 kilograms. So it’s not much mass at all but it’s not nothing either. It’s especially small mass when you consider what portion of the atom’s space the electrons consume. Not exact, but if a nucleus was the the size of a basketball, the electron would be 2 miles away. The vast vast vast majority of all matter is space.
 

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Hate to say it but they have a better power supply that my area. Here he would have got 3 quick shocks followed by a 3 hr wait until the pixies showed up.
Neighbors tree has taken the power out to our estate at least 10 times this year and its still healthy as hell. I asked them if they could give it a attitude adjustment with a chainsaw and they claim that it not on the right of way so they can not cut it.
The MOAB in the substation needs an “adjustment” it would seem. Linemen will do some down dirty stuff by “knife blading” a cutout in rural areas, but I’m sure few if any would ever admit to doing that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Another question. I had read somewhere that electricity does not flow at the speed of light. It is supposedly quite a lot slower. Have they ever measured how fast current flows through a wire? For example, pertaining to these high tension, super high voltage power lines, that go for hundreds of miles. Have they ever measured the time, and or speed it takes to travel from one end to the other? For example, say from the main generating station at Hoover Dam, to a substation in Los Angeles 300 miles away.

And does it flow at different speeds depending on the voltage and / or amperage? Say from a 9 volt transistor battery, compared to a super high voltage transmission line. Or is it all the same?
 

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Another question. I had read somewhere that electricity does not flow at the speed of light. It is supposedly quite a lot slower. Have they ever measured how fast current flows through a wire? For example, pertaining to these high tension, super high voltage power lines, that go for hundreds of miles. Have they ever measured the time, and or speed it takes to travel from one end to the other? For example, say from the main generating station at Hoover Dam, to a substation in Los Angeles 300 miles away.

And does it flow at different speeds depending on the voltage and / or amperage? Say from a 9 volt transistor battery, compared to a super high voltage transmission line. Or is it all the same?
You are correct. It takes several hours for a specific electron to cross a room, for example.
 

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What got redacted from your post?
Rectangle Font Sky Screenshot Software
 

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This isn't a mannequin... You can see his limbs tightening up, especially his arms. If you look closely his arms will contract and tighten as if he's trying to flex or curl a dumbbell. A mannequin wouldn't be moving, at least not like that. Also his legs go from straight to completely bent in a contracted state by the end of the video. As well as the sounds people are making, those are sounds of panic. By the end of the video there are people in the background hysterically crying as well. I don't care how much you love mannequins, you ain't crying like that for no mannequin lol. RIP to this man though, I'm sure he blacked out within seconds and passed quickly. Humbling thing to watch...

My guess is that this was a construction site with all that lumber we see. They were trying to intercept power to use on the construction job. Why it was done hot, who will ever know... It looks like a 3rd world type of environment where safety and using the right equipment and protocols are overlooked.
 

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Question. If electricity is considered to be the flow of electrons passing through the body, (much the same way these electrons pass over or through a wire in your house), are electrons matter? By that I mean "stuff" that all things are made from?

As I came to understand it in science class, all things are made up of atoms. Parts of the atom are electrons, neutrons, and protons. So are electrons actual matter in the sense of the word? When you get shocked, it sure as hell feels like "stuff" is flowing through your body. Or am I wrong? I mean you can't put a pile of electricity on the table, and have matter. But if you have enough atoms of whatever, you have "stuff". So what's the difference?
Well not to be a nerd but I don't believe free electrons can flow through fluids, the charge carriers are ions. I'm guessing since there are a lot of fluids in the human body most of the current will flow through the fluid? IDK
 

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Nothing, it’s one of the tools the new format has, it’s a spoiler alert so to speak. Just go to Ohm’s post and click on the blur and you’ll see it in focus.
Hunh…okay, thanks. (y)
 
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