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This panel is fed off of a panel I was looking at today to change out . I noticed the panel to be changed had double lugs where the second set of mains fed this panel . I opened it to see what was behind this door and saw this . It has wires going to a coil so I assuming it's some kind if transfer switch , but I'm not sure . So I'm sure some of you guys will be able to answer the question for me .
 

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This panel is fed off of a panel I was looking at today to change out . I noticed the panel to be changed had double lugs where the second set of mains fed this panel . I opened it to see what was behind this door and saw this . It has wires going to a coil so I assuming it's some kind if transfer switch , but I'm not sure . So I'm sure some of you guys will be able to answer the question for me .
Looks like a lighting contactor, lets say it is and it has normally open contacts,,,,,What happens when there is power at the coil?
 

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So I'm sure some of you guys will be able to answer the question for me .

Im pretty sure it is lighting contactor.

Westinghouse?

I was just working on the same panel a few months ago.

I have access to it still if you need some info.
 

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This panel is fed off of a panel I was looking at today to change out . I noticed the panel to be changed had double lugs where the second set of mains fed this panel . I opened it to see what was behind this door and saw this . It has wires going to a coil so I assuming it's some kind if transfer switch , but I'm not sure . So I'm sure some of you guys will be able to answer the question for me .
No its not a transfer switch. If it was you would see another physical piece of equipment (the transfer switch) in between those 2 sets of feeders.

You most likely have a lighting contactor as everyone is saying, it's used when you have large loads. In other words if you had 3 rows of 15 flourescent fixtures you could get a 3 pole contactor, bring your lines from the breaker to the line side of contactor, then from load side of contactor to your rows 1 2 and 3 out in the warehouse, and just have the 120v switch operate the coil of the contactor (the coil is just a magnetic mechanism that pulls down the contacts real fast to avoid arcing and pitting of the contacts, the coil on most contacts is low). Now you have maybe 1a at the sw as opposed to 30a.

Motor starters look similar to what you have there, your pic was hard to see.
 

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It's definitely a lighting contactor. Worked on quite a few panels like that around here. Oh, and you can never trust a panel schedule especially on older panels
 

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I am fairly shocked how bostongp can say it's nothing to do with a transfer switch. It has ASCO written right on it. ASCO, automatic switch co... is a big name in transfer switches. I agree it's most likely a contactor, but it very well could be one piece of a transfer switch and the whole thing is not pictured. A transfer switch has contactors, relays, lots of components, without seeing the whole system of what you are dealing with it's hard to say what your dealing with.
 

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EB Electric said:
I am fairly shocked how bostongp can say it's nothing to do with a transfer switch. It has ASCO written right on it. ASCO, automatic switch co... is a big name in transfer switches. I agree it's most likely a contactor, but it very well could be one piece of a transfer switch and the whole thing is not pictured. A transfer switch has contactors, relays, lots of components, without seeing the whole system of what you are dealing with it's hard to say what your dealing with.
Fairly shocked huh?? Could be a piece of a transfer switch?? For what?? Lol.....think about it. look at the physical size of this and what it contains, what's it gonna switch 3 night lights?? Like you said without seeing decent pics and not googling a name, I took an educated shot in the dark. If he needed a precise description I would have kept my mouth shut. and if I remember he said it was fed from the line double lugs in the panel. Still shocked?? I feel lucky EB out of everyone's comments mine stood out huh ; )

You have a problem with that EB? You want to question my intelligence, you don't have to, cause I'm not that smart. That's why I'm here learning. And I' haven't been around long, so when it comes to 50's style electrical apparatus, that's all you my man. I hope you don't get all bent outta shape about this, you seem sensitive. I was just trying to help someone out, because this forum has helped me out quite a bit so I figure give back if I can.
 

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HARRY304E said:
Looks like a lighting contactor, lets say it is and it has normally open contacts,,,,,What happens when there is power at the coil?
When there's power at the coil, the N.O. Contacts would close and the load side of the contact would be energized. So you would feed the line side of the contactor with a phase conductor, then whatever you wanted to wire on the load side. Anytime you look at an auxilary contact or schematic, or diagram, those diagrams are shown in a de energized state.

That almost looked like motor "heaters" at the bottom of the pic. A motor "heater" just immitates the thermal temperature of the inside motor windings using certain metals to mimic the characteristics of different amperage motors, if the heaters get to hot it cuts power to the motor and has to be manually reset. UNLESS you buy a motor starter or contactor with an automatic feature, which would cut power and wait for the motor to cool and then re-energize the motor on its own.

Contactors are used in so many things, your Condenser outside has one, many commercial facilities lighting systems contain them, roof de-icing equipment, your furnace,etc. There used for high amperage and being able to control high voltages like 480v/277( technically speaking I think anything over 25kv is high voltage) with voltages much lower, like 12v,24v,120,etc.
 

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You have a problem with that EB? You want to question my intelligence, you don't have to, cause I'm not that smart. That's why I'm here learning. And I' haven't been around long, so when it comes to 50's style electrical apparatus, that's all you my man. I hope you don't get all bent outta shape about this, you seem sensitive. I was just trying to help someone out, because this forum has helped me out quite a bit so I figure give back if I can.
You seem wound up, just pointing out a possibility! Just a bit surprising how quickly some ideas get shot down and written off. Have a good night.
 

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You seem wound up, just pointing out a possibility! Just a bit surprising how quickly some ideas get shot down and written off. Have a good night.
Welcome to the internet. Disagreements are settled in a mature manner, verbal gunfire.
 

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EB Electric said:
You seem wound up, just pointing out a possibility! Just a bit surprising how quickly some ideas get shot down and written off. Have a good night.
Nooooo don't think I'm mad at you lol... I was arguing your point. This is a website for learning. I appreciate you chiming in cause you helped confirm, in my mind, it's a lighting contactor, thanks ::thumbs up:: And you also helped my eyes see through the blurr to see the name.
 
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