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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was once told that the ground screw is what is really supposed to hold the wire in a box while the clamp which should not be overly tight is not sufficient on its own because it should be left loose enough to wiggle the wire a bit and if someone were to pull hard enough it would come out at that tightness.. hence the ground being tied into the ground screw is what is really holding it securely in the box. What do you guys think?

I belive he worded it like this " the clamp holds the wire while you secure it onto the ground terminal"

Ps. Hi everyone. My first post but I have read lots if threads over the years.
 

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Uhhhh, does the connector on a panel just hold the cable while you connect your bare wire to the ground bar? What about the case of a single-device box with 3-4 grounds marrette-ed together, while only two are under screws? Is that splice securing the cable(s) in the box?
Trololololol.
 

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Please supply one code reference for that nonsense and I'll think about possibly taking you seriously.

But really, we're constantly hearing people say "well I heard this and I heard that". We all work out of the same book
 

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When I first started in the trade doing residential I worked with a so called journey man who felt the clamp was to securely hold the wire and every friggin house we did we had a short somewhere to find because of this over tightening of the clamp. Now I give that same speech, clamp holds the wire but the grounds keep it from being pulled out!
We don't use the plastic boxes in my area, never have.
And all grounds hit the screws no tails marretted together unless absolutely needed.
Who is trying yank the wires out anyway!
Once the board goes on
 

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I find it very difficult to believe that after twenty years of internet electrical forums, there are still so many misconceptions out there running around about the most basic things. I can see if it were VFD drive type misconceptions or stuff having to do with process controls , but what secures a cable in the box, ground screw or clamp type stuff , ground up or down, and how many outlets is the proper number on a dwelling circuit is truly blowing my mind at this point.
 

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I find it very difficult to believe that after twenty years of internet electrical forums, there are still so many misconceptions out there running around about the most basic things......... .
That's because we're competing with all the YouTube How-To videos like this.

That, and many times what someone 'gets told' is never verified.... they accept it as fact and never bother to actually research it and find the truth. Hence, you end up wiring using the Urban Legend Electrical Code.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the replies. This was just for argument sake and thanks to the guy who said he gives that speech to prevent over tightened connectors and shorts. I have always been taught to put every ground under a screw aswell and not marret connect with a tail which is nec code..

And as for a panel connector..obviously its the connector holding it in because the ground is not screwed in an inch from the connector like a device box.

Basically its a two sided argument that both sides are correct and as long as you don't over tighten the clamp. I think that a properly tightened clamp is not enough to stop a wire being pulled out by some type of sabotage... which is hopefully unlikely. So both sides are correct to a point.
 

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Thanks for the replies. This was just for argument sake and thanks to the guy who said he gives that speech to prevent over tightened connectors and shorts. I have always been taught to put every ground under a screw aswell and not marret connect with a tail which is nec code..

And as for a panel connector..obviously its the connector holding it in because the ground is not screwed in an inch from the connector like a device box.

Basically its a two sided argument that both sides are correct and as long as you don't over tighten the clamp. I think that a properly tightened clamp is not enough to stop a wire being pulled out by some type of sabotage... which is hopefully unlikely. So both sides are correct to a point.
No, using one screw to hold multiple conductors is not correct and therefore the using ground wire to secure the cable argument is all wrong. Besides that, using any conductor in a cable to prevent the cable from movement is asking for an eventual short circuit or ground fault to happen.
 
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Electrical, no, in electronics, often times there is a metal strain relief clamp that acts as a ground when the drain or shield is folded under it.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

True, but those situations don't usually make for such as large a bang as ours do when they short out.
 

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I find it very difficult to believe that after twenty years of internet electrical forums, there are still so many misconceptions out there running around about the most basic things. I can see if it were VFD drive type misconceptions or stuff having to do with process controls , but what secures a cable in the box, ground screw or clamp type stuff , ground up or down, and how many outlets is the proper number on a dwelling circuit is truly blowing my mind at this point.
I've concluded that many electricians just aren't very smart, and that's why there are so many misconceptions out there.
 

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macmikeman said:
No, using one screw to hold multiple conductors is not correct and therefore the using ground wire to secure the cable argument is all wrong. Besides that, using any conductor in a cable to prevent the cable from movement is asking for an eventual short circuit or ground fault to happen.
Not multiple conductors 2 one one each side as long as they are the same gauge.
Inspector here even wants the grounds looped from box to box on sectional gangable boxes.
Don't see the point in that either but makes him happy.
But hey this is Ontario , what else would you expect?
 

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Not multiple conductors 2 one one each side as long as they are the same gauge.
Inspector here even wants the grounds looped from box to box on sectional gangable boxes.
Don't see the point in that either but makes him happy.
But hey this is Ontario , what else would you expect?
I used to do that when I did residential work. I just felt more comfortable with it. I had visions of the gangable boxes coming apart and not having a continuos bond.


Now............I just dont give 5hit.:laughing:
 
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