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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok I am wanting a generator backup in my new home. At the current time I will be using a portable bonded neutral generator.
Now I want an inexpensive option, so far I am looking into the "interlock style"(I do realize I have to remove bond inside my generator to the frame for this first option) for my Eaton BR main panel where the main breaker is interlocked with the genset backfeed breaker. This allows me to feed my whole panel,however I would have to switch off some breakers in an outage because obviously a 3000w generator cant run a whole house,but I like the fact that I can run all my led lighting,tvs,computer and a coffee maker etc at the same time,from my main panel.
My other option is to install a Eaton BR transfer switch panel, it is a 3 pole (has the option to switch neutral)so I can use my generator as a stand alone system or floating neutral system. This panel has 8 circuits so it limits the amount of circuits I can use. Obviously more money with this system, I guess I am just wondering what are the advantages, with the dedicated panel the only real pro I see is that when I transfer power to my generator because there is only the 8 dedicated circuits I am not worried about overloading the genset or turning off a bunch of breakers like in my previous solution above. I guess the fact you use a cheap portable generator as a standalone system could be a pro but almost every cheap generator can have the bonding jumper removed thus making the switched neutral unnecessary again. What am I missing here.
Thanks hope it isn't too confusing.
 

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Ok I am wanting a generator backup in my new home. At the current time I will be using a portable bonded neutral generator.
Now I want an inexpensive option, so far I am looking into the "interlock style"(I do realize I have to remove bond inside my generator to the frame for this first option) for my Eaton BR main panel where the main breaker is interlocked with the genset backfeed breaker. This allows me to feed my whole panel,however I would have to switch off some breakers in an outage because obviously a 3000w generator cant run a whole house,but I like the fact that I can run all my led lighting,tvs,computer and a coffee maker etc at the same time,from my main panel.
My other option is to install a Eaton BR transfer switch panel, it is a 3 pole (has the option to switch neutral)so I can use my generator as a stand alone system or floating neutral system. This panel has 8 circuits so it limits the amount of circuits I can use. Obviously more money with this system, I guess I am just wondering what are the advantages, with the dedicated panel the only real pro I see is that when I transfer power to my generator because there is only the 8 dedicated circuits I am not worried about overloading the genset or turning off a bunch of breakers like in my previous solution above. I guess the fact you use a cheap portable generator as a standalone system could be a pro but almost every cheap generator can have the bonding jumper removed thus making the switched neutral unnecessary again. What am I missing here.
Thanks hope it isn't too confusing.
Use a sub pannel with a dryer or stove cord comming out of it.
The main panel use a stove or dryer receptical on it.
it depends on how many amp you will need.
Then you plug your sub pannel to your main.
And put a receptical" stove or Dryer to you gen-set.
I have seen this done a lot. Its cheap and leagal
Then you just unplug and swithch from gen-set to main power.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Use a sub pannel with a dryer or stove cord comming out of it.
The main panel use a stove or dryer receptical on it.
it depends on how many amp you will need.
Then you plug your sub pannel to your main.
And put a receptical" stove or Dryer to you gen-set.
I have seen this done a lot. Its cheap and leagal
Then you just unplug and swithch from gen-set to main power.
I would personally rather use the proper equipment, I can buy the transfer switch cheaper than subpanels and cords etc, just ultimately wondering how the transfer switch trumps the interlock,though maybe I was missing something since I don't do residential much.
 

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Sideways Sparky
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Use a sub pannel with a dryer or stove cord comming out of it.
The main panel use a stove or dryer receptical on it.
it depends on how many amp you will need.
Then you plug your sub pannel to your main.
And put a receptical" stove or Dryer to you gen-set.
I have seen this done a lot. Its cheap and leagal
Then you just unplug and swithch from gen-set to main power.
It is not legal to put a cord on a permanently fixed piece of equipment.

I can't convince our Inspection dept to allow a cord connected furnace. You are doing it to a panel?
 

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Electrical Contractor
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Use a sub pannel with a dryer or stove cord comming out of it.
The main panel use a stove or dryer receptical on it.
it depends on how many amp you will need.
Then you plug your sub pannel to your main.
And put a receptical" stove or Dryer to you gen-set.
I have seen this done a lot. Its cheap and leagal
Then you just unplug and swithch from gen-set to main power.

What kind of hack advice is this?
Its crap installations such as that, which cause fires or worse, kill people

Install a proper 60 amp CH or Siemens transfer panel and make the installation code compliant.
Those small transfer panels are roughly $300
 

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What kind of hack advice is this?
Its crap installations such as that, which cause fires or worse, kill people

Install a proper 60 amp CH or Siemens transfer panel and make the installation code compliant.
Those small transfer panels are roughly $300
it meets code.
I see it alot around where i live.
I have never hacked in anything in my life.
Same as plugging a dryer in or stove.
i have never done it, but now e.c that have.
tell me how it dose not meet code??
 

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Neutral bonded generator or not, I have been told by inspectors that we are not allowed to switch the neutral as if the pole were to fail and the neutral didn't switch back it would create a bigger hazard than having the neutral bonded in two spots
 

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It's done all the time , as far hack work that's a load of crap. The odds of a bad connection are better at the breaker than in a stove rec.
He is right on the flexible cord use rule.
Inspector allows it here as long as it's a moulded cap , factory made.
I done it a couple just for a few basic circuits.
Furnace ,water pump random light circuit.
Inspection won't let us use the interlock add on.
No modifications allowed. That don't make sense either.
 

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rule please.
4-012
(2) Flexible cord shall be permitted to be used for
(a) electrical equipment for household or similar use that is intended to be
(i) moved from place to place; or
(ii) detachably connected according to a Canadian Electrical Code, Part II Standard; and
(3) Flexible cord shall not be used
(a) as a substitute for the fixed wiring of structures and shall not be




A sub panel would be classified as a fixed item, not portable.
 

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wcord said:
4-012 (2) Flexible cord shall be permitted to be used for (a) electrical equipment for household or similar use that is intended to be (i) moved from place to place; or (ii) detachably connected according to a Canadian Electrical Code, Part II Standard; and (3) Flexible cord shall not be used (a) as a substitute for the fixed wiring of structures and shall not be A sub panel would be classified as a fixed item, not portable.
It's not a sub anymore it's a generator panel portable power source.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Neutral bonded generator or not, I have been told by inspectors that we are not allowed to switch the neutral as if the pole were to fail and the neutral didn't switch back it would create a bigger hazard than having the neutral bonded in two spots
ok, so I guess I will phone inspector and make sure the main panel mechanical interlock passes than that's what I will do, it there fore acts the exact same as a proper transfer panel if we can not switch the neutral in Canada.
 

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It's not a sub anymore it's a generator panel portable power source.
I disagree, in that you have permanently tied in circuits.
Portable means movable, not screwed to the wall.
IF, the panel was temporary, ie portable with receptacles, then 76-010-2 would be the rule .
Really, whatever the inspector allows, is what counts, but around here, a cord connected sub, wont pass.
 

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4-012
(2) Flexible cord shall be permitted to be used for
(a) electrical equipment for household or similar use that is intended to be
(i) moved from place to place; or
(ii) detachably connected according to a Canadian Electrical Code, Part II Standard; and
(3) Flexible cord shall not be used
(a) as a substitute for the fixed wiring of structures and shall not be




A sub panel would be classified as a fixed item, not portable.
ok, and i gess you can't. i gess you cant run cabtire into a transfer panel too.
"Hard wired "see that lots too, when they are in the garage.
But its funny all the panels have a esa sticker on them.
 
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