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Which do you prefer to use, plugs/screws, tapcons, hammer drive pins?

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Which do you prefer to use for installing onto a concrete or brick surface for installing conduit and straps? I can only think of the three choices.
I really like using rawl plugs and screws over hammer drive pin anchors simply for the fact that I can remove the conduit if I make a mistake. But I'm starting to think that the added cost of buying tapcons will increase installation speed greatly.
I really like those sds bits that swap from 3/16 bit to hex head too.
 

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We liked to use wap-pins (sample) or plastic plugs (w/screws) for straps and light fastening. And 1/4-20 wedge anchors for bigger boxes and such. This is for poured concrete, mind you.
 

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Elechicken!
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We use almost exclusively wallplugs because they can be used in drywall or concrete and we only have to keep one thing in the truck.

If we are running 100's of feet of conduit (say in a parking garage) we use tapcons.
 

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I like drive pins better all around. However, Tapcons are much easier to remove. Drive pins are removable. I cut my teeth on drive pins so thats maybe why I like them so much. Back then we called them "nail ins"
 

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The short nail-ins are quick, it's just drill - place - whack and move on to the next one. They're just easy. Not that the others are hard but it's easy to lose track how much easier these are. Think about it, you could set these in the dark with one hand with gloves on and it wouldn't really slow you down.

They are far harder to remove, though, no doubt, although if you use a cat's paw type nail puller its not that bad. Unless you're making a lot of adjustments, I think you're still ahead for time.

Now there's a lot of places I won't use them, for example I wouldn't use them to set a box to the wall, too hard if you ever have to remove that box. In that case I prefer plastic anchors to tapcons. I can use my choice of screw - usually something with a square drive. If you have to you can install and remove them without a power tool. It's sometimes useful to be able to start the screw with a hand driver if it's a bit fiddly to get set up.

The disadvantage of plastic anchors versus tapcons and nailins is you can't drill through what you're mounting. For example to set an enclosure to the wall with plastic anchors, you have to hold the enclosure in place, mark the holes, drill, and hope you didn't screw up marking the holes. With tapcons or nail-ins, you can place the enclosure and drill through and drive through the mounting holes one at a time, zero layout. But I would prefer not to use nail-ins inside an enclosure, too hard to remove.
 

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My preference is nail-ins. I use two tools to make them removable and reusable if necessary.

A custom setting tool, which is a tool steel 3/4" round bar 6" long. One end bored with a 1/4" hole 1-1/4" deep, used for setting the anchor along with the box or strap tight to the wall.

The opposite end has a 1/4" bored hole that is 3/16 deep, used to set the pin slightly proud of flush, in order to be able to get under the pin head, to pull it out.

For removal of the pin, I use a carpet pry bar, from the flooring trade, compact and strong. With this method the nail-ins can easily and quickly removed, and even be reused if required.

There is one manufacturer (can't recall which) that makes the pin with some rolled threads, and a Phillips head for removal. They are more costly, and harder to set the pin. So I stick to the plain ones and my setting tool.

I carry several lengths of nail-ins in my tray from 1" to 2" for different situations, and a small box of 3/6" diameter nail-ins for small work.

For drywall and plaster I use zinc zip it screw in anchors, or plastic anchors where the zip it ones are too large.
 

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the pin anchors are a bear to remove if you need to
i must be an ape because ive never had good luck with tapcons
I have the same opinion on the tapcons. They seem to either strip out or snap. Maybe they are the Home Depot sold ones that I am using.
 

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Best thing to take out pins for us has been a air hammer, just go down the line and blast em. If I've got a lot of them to set I a straight pin punch for the hammer with a dimple drilled in it and I can go down and blast them in too.
 
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