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Electrical contractor 37 years. Electrical inspector 2 years
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Who the check is written out to has nothing to do with it.

Besides, there is no state license in New York. Every municipality and county has different licensing requirements (or none) and different regulations governing the use of those licenses.
About 15 years ago NY State Electrical Contractors Association had a flier that was called " The Legal Monitor" It had an article about licensing and payments. That is what I was referring to. It was about an electrician who had both a corporation and a DBA. The license was under the corporation and the check was made out to the DBA. The court basically said the check has to follow the license. Maybe the law has changed
 

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The Accidental Welder
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I wire a pizza joint....

A guy from CA hires a GC from MA to open a restaurant in CT in a strip mall owned by a guy from NH who uses a management company out of RI.


Which one of them is permitted to pay me for my electrical services?
 
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Small Potatoes
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A guy from CA hires a GC from MA to open a restaurant in CT in a strip mall owned by a guy from NH who uses a management company out of RI.


Which one of them is permitted to pay me for my electrical services?
The answer is simple. All of them, but you already know that.:biggrin:

The idea that who pays you is regulated by a trade licensing authority is totally ridiculous. :vs_laugh:

A drug dealer can pay a licensed contractor in crack and no licensing authority has the legal right to prevent it. There are some other laws prohibiting it, but that's another story. :surprise:
 

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False, in some states it's perfectly legal.
It may be so but I would bet it is not that way in many states. And if it is allowed, IMO, you should not be allowed to do it.... It defeats the purpose of requiring a license.
 

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It may be so but I would bet it is not that way in many states. And if it is allowed, IMO, you should not be allowed to do it.... It defeats the purpose of requiring a license.
I don't see what difference it makes. Florida is a huge state and they allow a license holder to qualify a company other than their own. It seems to work out fine for them.
 

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Tdlr.com

Sec. 1305.159. Electrical Contractor.
(a) An applicant for a license as an electrical contractor must:
(1) be licensed under this chapter as a master electrician or employ a person licensed under this chapter as a master electrician;
(2) establish proof of financial responsibility in the manner prescribed by the executive director; and
(3) maintain workers' compensation coverage for the contractor's employees through an insurance company authorized to engage in the business of insurance in this state or through self-insurance, or elect not to obtain workers' compensation coverage, as provided by Subchapter A, Chapter 406, Labor Code.
(b) A person who holds a master electrician license issued or recognized under this chapter may only be assigned to a single electrical contractor, unless the master electrician owns more than 50 percent of the electrical contracting business.
 

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I don't see what difference it makes. Florida is a huge state and they allow a license holder to qualify a company other than their own. It seems to work out fine for them.
Qualifying is very different. It really gets down to liability. What's to stop someone from renting their license to someone who doesn't have a license?
I would never let someone use my license. It is not worth the risk.
 

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Qualifying is very different. It really gets down to liability. What's to stop someone from renting their license to someone who doesn't have a license?
I would never let someone use my license. It is not worth the risk.
The only thing that stops it is state laws. Some allow qualifying, others don't. "Renting" your license to a company isn't legal in my state, but it happens anyway, though there is a crackdown on it nowadays.

As for risk, some people consider it worth the risk, others don't. It's all what you can tolerate.
 

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Electrical contractor 37 years. Electrical inspector 2 years
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The answer is simple. All of them, but you already know that.:biggrin:

The idea that who pays you is regulated by a trade licensing authority is totally ridiculous. :vs_laugh:

A drug dealer can pay a licensed contractor in crack and no licensing authority has the legal right to prevent it. There are some other laws prohibiting it, but that's another story. :surprise:
Anybody can pay for electrical services. It's who receives payment that the municipalities look at. Where I am the person receiving payment has to be either a stock holder or a legal partner. If two or more electricians partner up on a large job then both have to be a license holder.
 

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I have a current Texas Electrical Masters License available for hire as the Master Electrician of record for your company to perform work statewide .I would like outsource it in a yearly basis. I have held my license since 2018. Due to health readons I am pulling out of the trade that I love. Let's talk, I'm sure we can obtain a win win agreement.


TARIK H. Kirtis
Are you still leasing?
 

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Low Voltage, Multi-Family Residential Electrical Construction, Fire Alarm and Life Safety
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I don't see what difference it makes. Florida is a huge state and they allow a license holder to qualify a company other than their own. It seems to work out fine for them.
The key phrase that you used there was QUALIFY A COMPANY which I understand that to mean that as a master, you're vouching for whoever is doing the work. It's much like when a master gives an apprentice a letter of recommendation for the Journeyman's exam, he's saying, "I've observed this individual's work and they are competent to perform at this level." So while it may be technically legal to cover someone's project with your license, it's dangerous to do it for someone that you don't know. A lot of less-than-scrupulous contractors pay fines as part of the cost of doing business and the biggest thing that would concern me is someone racking up violations in my name. Even if they pay the fines, I still look like a terrible person at renewal time.
 
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