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make sure you up-sell him on a version that has indicators that tell you when they are no longer working. Most SPDs sacrifice themselves to protect against high surges. They do the job, but fry in the attempt and need to be replaced. The better ones give you an indicator that lets you know it's no longer working. Some even give you a counter that tells you how many times it has taken a hit so that you can anticipate an impending failure. Knowing that the SPD is no longer there is a good call-back for you, and a good safety measure for someone concerned enough to want an SPD in the first place.
 

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> up-sell him ...The better ones give you an indicator that lets you know it's no longer working.

My impression is that most at-panel suppressors have an LED. It is good eye-candy for the guy who pays, doesn't really cost much, and IS good to have. Perhaps there is a low-level line without this? All I ever notice are the ones with LEDs.

Of course if it is in the panel behind the door it will only get checked every month when the homeowner does his monthly GFIC test (??). The external ones might get noticed every time he walks by.

> Some even give you a counter that tells you how many times it has taken a hit

Interesting. Does confirm that "you needed it". I'm not inclined to use it for prediction. You can have a hundred little hits and then one BIG HIT. A large number of little hits does zap-out bits of carbide and eventually it's toast, but just one big HIT will also toast it. Still, gives the customer a reason to replace it instead of ignoring it.

> I use Hubbell surge receptacles for point of use

Yup, I forgot those.Hubbel's indicator seems annoying: the LED is just Power, if failed it beeps/whines. There is a screw to defeat this until replacement, but I dunno about talking a customer into screwing with a whiny outlet after a major storm. The Bryant appears to be the Hubbel with a better sell-sheet. The Leviton is different- one LED seems to confirm Power and Status. Pass & Seymour is LED and beeper with a slide-switch defeat. Lev and PS claim higher Joule numbers, but Bryant says voltage is more important (yet claims a high clamp voltage). I suspect the techno-specs are all babble anyway.
 

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At my place, I use Hubbell surge receptacles for point of use like tvs and computers, coupled with surge strips.
I though about using the pass and Seymour version in my house till I saw the price. I don't have any electronics that expensive to justify it.
 

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Will be doing a panel swap and the customer wants whole house surge suppression. Any recommendations? I see Square Diddley makes one. How do you hook them up?

Probably a gimmick but the customer gets what he wants, right :) ?

I've been installing Intermatic IG1240RC3 surge protector's for years
There not a gimmick, but you have to explain the good, bad and the ugly to the customer on how they work and if their home gets hits by a large surge the suppressor will have to be replaced.
Plus many customers think that a surge suppressor will protect them from lightning which isn't the case.

Installation is very straight forward. Mounts to the panel and connections to neutral, ground and two circuits.


Mike
 

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I like the siemans one that is a 2 pole 20 with no handle tie. It also is still 2 breakers so no space it wasted in the panel. easy upsell and no addl labor cost on a new service.
 

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I debated on posting this, some may find this interesting and may will not give a sh!t.
I little bit about “surge suppression”. Two main types of suppressors found in commercial/residential environments.
MOV, Metal Oxide Varistors are common, they short out at about 3x the rated voltage to kill the line. Great for big spikes They will wear out and are only good for a few good hits they are permanently shorted and must be replaced. A dead one will read a short and can not be fixed by replacing the fuse, the fuse is just to shut off the circuit from the short. Good units have replaceable plug in MOVs. MOV are fast but after a few large hits or a lot of smaller ones the voltage they start conducting at lower and lower voltages and nuisance trips could start occurring. Fast acting.
GDTs, Gas Discharge Tubes are those little things that look like miniature spools in a glass envelope, some older ones may have a little radioactive material in them. They are light sensitive so keep them in the box, they may throw off bench testing. They are slow and mostly seen in high frequency like data protection.
SAD, These are the hot rods of electronics world, very very fast. Found on generator feeds where lightning is not a big problem but lots of transites are happening. Many times they will be supplemental to a MOV. Silicon Avalanche Diodes are super zener diodes they can’t handle high power spikes but can be set to very near the operating voltage around 2x or less. Last a long time.
 
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